Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool

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Abstract

The WELP Tool was developed in order to produce and store 24-hour energy profiles and calculate energy intensity. The database uses input data to automatically calculate hourly energy profiles for each facility within an agency for each day in 2008. The resulting hourly data for the entire year is stored in the database and queried to produce output requested by the user by using the GUI. The GUI provides a simple way to retrieve and view analysis results of system facilities for each agency and analyze additional data. The GUI provides a series of options and lists to choose from to retrieve the appropriate level of data analysis results. The WELP Tool analyzes total energy and demand and energy intensity. The results of the energy consumption and demand analysis can be retrieved at four levels of detail; agency wide, sub-division, facility type, and facility specific. The results of the energy intensity analysis are reported by day and by month for each facility type.


Background

On January 19, 2007, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) initiated a formal proceeding investigating California’s water-energy relationships (Application 07-01-024). The CPUC authorized water-energy pilot projects and three studies designed to (a) validate claims that saving water can save energy, and (b) to explore whether embedded energy savings associated with water use efficiency are measurable and verifiable. The CPUC engaged the California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) to manage three studies. The team of GEI Consultants, Inc. and Navigant Consulting, Inc. (the Study Team) was engaged to conduct two of the studies which were published in 2010. Study 2, Water Agency and Function Component Study and Embedded Energy-Water Load Profiles. As part of Study 2, GEI developed the Water-Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool, which compiles water-energy load profiles from numerous types of data and formats [2].

Who Uses Welp?

WELP can be used by the CPUC, water and energy utilities, and other water and energy stakeholders to expeditiously develop detailed water-energy load profiles for other California water and wastewater agencies. The pre-formatted numeric and graphical outputs help policymakers, utilities, and others understand any water or wastewater agency’s water-energy relationships at a glance. These data outputs also help to quickly identify systems and functions that appear to have high potential for energy savings and/or energy load shifting [2].

Requirements/Caveats

Users of the WELP Tool must have Microsoft Access(R). The data has been pre-loaded into the tool, so users are limited to analyzing data from 2008, from a predetermined set of California water and wastewater agencies (approximately 20).

WELP Basics

The WELP Tool was developed in order to produce and store 24-hour energy profiles and calculate energy intensity of water and wastewater agencies in California. The database uses input data to automatically calculate hourly energy profiles for each facility within an agency for each day in 2008. The resulting hourly data for the entire year is stored in the database and queried to produce output requested by the user by using the GUI [3].

Energy data were requested from each agency at the most detailed level possible for each facility in an agency's system. The level of detail was determined by the type of energy meter used at each facility. Energy data can be stored as energy and demand meter readings for specific billing periods, or as hourly interval meter data. Furthermore, energy service providers can categorize each hour of the day into either on-peak, partial peak, or off-peak categories. Energy data were requested in kilowatt hours (kWh), and demand data were requested in kilowatts (kW)[3].

Water data were requested from each agency on a daily time-step. Water data were stored in the WELP Tool in units of millions of gallons (MG). These units were selected because of typical treatment plant capacity and metering is tracked in MG[3].

References

  1.  "Embedded Energy in Water Studies -- Study 2, Appendix C"
  2. 2.0 2.1 (Published: August 2010) "Embedded Energy in Water Studies -- Study 2: Water Agency and Function Component Study and Embedded Energy-Water Load Profiles"
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 (Published: August 2010) "Embedded Energy in Water Studies -- Study 2: Appendix C"