Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California

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Journal Article: Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California

Abstract
Long Valley caldera, a 17- by 32-km elliptical depression on the east front of the Sierra Nevada, formed 0.7 m.y. ago during eruption of the Bishop tuff. Subsequent intracaldera volcanism included eruption of (1) aphyric rhyolite 0.68-0.64 m.y. ago during resurgent doming of the caldera floor, (2) porphyritic hornblende-biotite rhyolite from centers peripheral to the resurgent dome at 0.5, 0.3, and 0.1 m.y. ago, and (3) porphyritic hornblende-biotite rhyodacite from outer ring fractures 0.2 m.y. ago to 50,000 yr ago, a sequence that apparently records progressive crystallization of a subjacent chemically zoned magma chamber. Holocene rhyolitic and phreatic eruptions suggest that residual magma was present in the chamber as recently as 450 yr ago. Intracaldera hydrothermal activity began at least 0.3 m.y. ago and was widespread in the caldera moat; it has since declined due to self-sealing of near-surface caldera sediments by zeolitization, argillization, and silicification and has become localized on recently reactivated north-west-trending Sierra Nevada frontal faults that tap hot water at depth.

Authors 
Roy A. Bailey, G. Brent Dalrymple and Marvin A. Lanphere








Published Journal 
Journal of Geophysical Research, 1976





DOI 
10.1029/JB081i005p00725

Online 
Internet link for Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California

Citation

Roy A. Bailey,G. Brent Dalrymple,Marvin A. Lanphere. 1976. Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):725-744.


Related Geothermal Exploration Activities
Activities (1)


Areas (1)
  1. Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area
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