The Use Of Mixing Models And Chemical Geothermometers For Estimating Underground Temperatures In Geothermal Systems

Jump to: navigation, search


OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library

Journal Article: The Use Of Mixing Models And Chemical Geothermometers For Estimating Underground Temperatures In Geothermal Systems

Abstract
Application of various chemical geothermometers and mixing models indicate underground temperatures of 260°C, 280°C and 265°C in the Geysir, Hveravellir and Landmannalaugar geothermal fields in Iceland, respectively. Mixing of the hot water with cold water occurs in the upflow zones of all these geothermal systems. Linear relations between chloride, boron and Δ18O constitute the main evidence for mixing, which is further substantiated by chloride, silica and sulphate relations in the Geysir and Hveravellir fields. A new carbonate-silica mixing model is proposed which is useful in distinguishing boiled and non-boiled geothermal waters. This model can also be used to estimate underground temperatures using data from warm springs. This model, as well as the chloride-enthalpy model and the Na-Li, and CO2-gas geothermometers, invariably yield similar results as the quartz geothermometer sometimes also does. By contrast, the Na-K and the Na-K-Ca geothermometers yield low values in the case of boiling hot springs, largely due to loss of potassium from solution in the upflow. The results of these geothermometers are unreliable for mixed waters due to leaching subsequent to mixing.

Author 
Stefan Arnorsson








Published Journal 
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1985





DOI 
Not Provided
Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org



 

Citation

Stefan Arnorsson. 1985. The Use Of Mixing Models And Chemical Geothermometers For Estimating Underground Temperatures In Geothermal Systems. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. (!) .