Tensor Time Domain Electromagnetic Resistivity Measurements At Ngatamariki Geothermal Field, New Zealand

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Journal Article: Tensor Time Domain Electromagnetic Resistivity Measurements At Ngatamariki Geothermal Field, New Zealand

Abstract
Experimental measurements in the Ngatamariki geothermal field, North Island, New Zealand were made to test the applicability of the time domain electromagnetic method for detailed investigation of the resistivity structure within a geothermal field. Low-frequency square wave signals were transmitted through three grounded bipole current sources sited about 8 km from the measurement lines. Despite high levels of electrical noise, transient electric field vectors could be determined reliably for times between 0.02 and 3.3 s after each step in the source current. Instantaneous apparent resistivity tensors were then calculated. Apparent resistivity pseudosections along the two measurement lines show smooth variations of resistivity from site to site. Over most of the field the images consistently show a three-layer resistivity structure with a conductive middle layer (3-10 Ωm) representing the conductive upper part of the thermal reservoir. A deep-seated region of low resistivity in the northwest of the field may indicate a conductive structure at about 1 km associated with a deeper diorite intrusion. Measurements sited closer than about 100 m to drillholes appear to have been disturbed by metallic casing in the holes. A change in resistivity structure in the east of the field may indicate a major geological or hydrothermal boundary.

Authors 
George F. Risk, T. Grant Caldwell and Hugh M. Bibby








Published Journal 
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 2003





DOI 
Not Provided
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Citation

George F. Risk,T. Grant Caldwell,Hugh M. Bibby. 2003. Tensor Time Domain Electromagnetic Resistivity Measurements At Ngatamariki Geothermal Field, New Zealand. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. (!) .