Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications

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Journal Article: Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications

Abstract
Temperature data obtained in boreholes serve as critical input to many fields of engineering, exploration, and research: (1) in well completions, (2) gas and fluid production engineering, (3) in the exploration for hydrocarbons and ore minerals, and (4) for testing hypotheses concerning the evolution of the Earth's crust and tectonic processes. Wireline-conveyed maximum-recording thermometers and continuous-reading thermistors are used to measure absolute temperatures, differential temperatures, and temperature gradients at depth. Temperature logs can detect thermal anomalies produced by temperature contrasts between the borehole fluid and the formation fluid or formation (also cement behind casing). A variety of information can be obtained from the identification and interpretation of these anomalies. High-resolution temperature-gradient logs can be used for detailed lithologic identification and correlation, of similar quality to other electric and nuclear well logs. The intent of this paper is to provide a general introduction to the diverse applications of these data

Author 
Stephen Prensky








Published Journal 
The Log Analyst, 1992





DOI 
Not Provided
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Online 
Internet link for Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications

Citation

Stephen Prensky. 1992. Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications. The Log Analyst. 33(3):313-333.