Substorm Wave Base Felsic Hydroclastic Deposits In The Archean Lac Des Vents Volcanic Complex, Abitibi Belt, Canada

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Journal Article: Substorm Wave Base Felsic Hydroclastic Deposits In The Archean Lac Des Vents Volcanic Complex, Abitibi Belt, Canada

Abstract
Volcaniclastic deposits of the 2.3-km-thick Archean Lac des Vents volcanic complex are an integral part of major submarine volcanic construction. The volcanic edifice, which formed on a subaqueous basalt plain, is comparable to modern seamounts resting on the ocean floor. The initial 770 m of the mafic-felsic edifice, subject of this study, is composed of massive, brecciated and pillowed basalts, massive to brecciated felsic lava flows and abundant felsic fragmental rocks of hydroclastic origin. Four distinct volcaniclastic lithofacies constitute the latter: (1) the pumice lapilli-tuff lithofacies; (2) the lapilli-tuff breccia lithofacies characterized by two sublithofacies; (3) the turbidite tuff and tuff-breccia lithofacies; and (4) the volcanic sandstone and breccia lithofacies. These four volcaniclastic lithofacies are considered to be the result of explosive and non-explosive hydrovolcanic fragmentation processes operating at depths below storm wave base (> 200 m). Primary deposition or limited remobilization of unconsolidated hydroclastic debris is shown by the preservation of delicate clasts and volcanic textures, and heat retention structures. The principal transport agents are high-concentration sediment gravity flows occurring under laminar and turbulent flow conditions. High- and low-density turbiditic tuffs and fine-grained tuff fallout deposits, are related to either the dissipating stages of volcanic eruptions or slumping of syneruptive volcanic debris on the flanks of a subaqueous volcanic edifice. Ubiquitous interstratification of volcaniclastic turbidites, shale, and pillowed basalt flows with the felsic lava flows and fragmental debris favours subaqueous deposition. These features combined with the absence of wave-induced sedimentary structures, imply deposition in water depths in excess of 200 m. Viscous feldspar-phyric massive and brecciated felsic flows, and associated volcaniclastics cross cut by felsic dykes, suggest vent proximity. The abundance of breccia-size hydroclastic debris is consistent with this interpretation. Collectively, these criteria argue for subaqueous fragmentation and deposition of volcaniclastics of inferred hydroclastic origin close to the central vent area at depths below storm wave base.

Authors 
Wulf Mueller, E. H. Chown and Robin Potvin








Published Journal 
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1994





DOI 
Not Provided
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Citation

Wulf Mueller,E. H. Chown,Robin Potvin. 1994. Substorm Wave Base Felsic Hydroclastic Deposits In The Archean Lac Des Vents Volcanic Complex, Abitibi Belt, Canada. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. (!) .