Stratovolcano

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Stratovolcano

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Stratovolcano:
Stratovolcanoes, also known as composite volcanoes, are conical volcanoes composed of multiple layers of intermediate to felsic lava, ash, and other volcanic debris. Their steep profiles are the result of the high viscosity of less mafic lavas, which prevents them from flowing great distances during eruption and cooling. Stratovolcanoes are commonly encountered in chains adjacent to subduction zones, where dewatering of the subducting slab and melting of the slab and overlying mantle rocks leads to magma generation.
Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle


Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical stratovolcano.[1]

Topographic Features

List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas:

"Some of the Earth's grandest mountains are composite volcanoes-sometimes called stratovolcanoes. They are typically steep-sided, symmetrical cones of large dimension built of alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs and may rise as much as 8,000 feet above their bases. Some of the most conspicuous and beautiful mountains in the world are composite volcanoes, including Mount Fuji in Japan, Mount Cotopaxi in Ecuador, Mount Shasta in California, Mount Hood in Oregon, and Mount St. Helens and Mount Rainier in Washington.

Most composite volcanoes have a crater at the summit which contains a central vent or a clustered group of vents. Lavas either flow through breaks in the crater wall or issue from fissures on the flanks of the cone. Lava, solidified within the fissures, forms dikes that act as ribs which greatly strengthen the cone.

The essential feature of a composite volcano is a conduit system through which magma from a reservoir deep in the Earth's crust rises to the surface. The volcano is built up by the accumulation of material erupted through the conduit and increases in size as lava, cinders, ash, etc., are added to its slopes."[1]

Examples

Want to add an example to this list? Select a Geothermal Resource Area to edit its "Topographic Features" property using the "Edit with Form" button.

CSV
Geothermal
Resource
Area
Geothermal
Region
Tectonic
Setting
Host
Rock
Age
Host
Rock
Lithology
Mean
Capacity
Mean
Reservoir
Temp
Ogiri Geothermal Area Ryuku Arc Subduction Zone Quaternary Andesite 30 MW30,000 kW
30,000,000 W
30,000,000,000 mW
0.03 GW
3.0e-5 TW
533.15 K260 °C
500 °F
959.67 °R
Oguni Geothermal Field Japan Subduction Zone 2 MW2,000 kW
2,000,000 W
2,000,000,000 mW
0.002 GW
2.0e-6 TW
475.15 K202 °C
395.6 °F
855.27 °R
Rincon De La Vieja Geothermal Resource Area Rincon De La Vieja Subduction Zone Andesite 42 MW42,000 kW
42,000,000 W
42,000,000,000 mW
0.042 GW
4.2e-5 TW
533.15 K260 °C
500 °F
959.67 °R
Takigami Geothermal Area Ryuku Arc Extensional Tectonics
Subduction Zone
Tertiary Andesite 28 MW28,000 kW
28,000,000 W
28,000,000,000 mW
0.028 GW
2.8e-5 TW
478.15 K205 °C
401 °F
860.67 °R
Yamagawa Geothermal Area Ryuku Arc Subduction Zone Neogene to Recent Volcanics 30 MW30,000 kW
30,000,000 W
30,000,000,000 mW
0.03 GW
3.0e-5 TW

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 John Watson. Principal Types of Volcanoes [Internet]. 2011. U.S. Geological Survey. [updated 2011/01/03;cited 2013/12/24]. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volc/types.html