Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

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Book: Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

Abstract
Upper Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks of the Jemez Mountains are subdivided into three groups the Keres Group, in the south, the Polvadera Group, mainly in the north, and the Tewa Group, in the central and flanking parts of the mountains. The Keres Group is divisible informally into two subgroups an older subgroup, consisting of the basalt of Chamisa Mesa and the Canovas Canyon Rhyolite, and a younger subgroup, consisting of the Paliza Canyon Formation and the Bearhead Rhyolite. The older subgroup is a basalt-rhyolite association; the younger subgroup is a more differentiated basalt-andesite-dadte-rhyolite association. The Polvadera Group includes the Lobato Basalt; the andesites, dacites, and quartz latites of the Tschicoma Formation; and El Rechuelos Rhyolite. These formations constitute a still younger basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite association in the Jemez Mountains. The Tewa Group includes the Bandelier Tuff, Cerro Rubio Quartz Latite, Cerro Toledo Rhyolite, and the Valles Rhyolite and represents the climax of rhyolitic volcanism in the Jemez Mountains. Subdivision of the Bandelier Tuff is revised so that it consists of only two members the Otowi Member, which includes the Guaje Pumice Bed, and the Tshirege Member, which includes the Tsankawi Pumice Bed. The Valles Rhyolite is subdivided into six new members. Ages of many of the formations are refined by radiometric dating.

Authors 
Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith and Clarence Samuel Ross








Published 
U.S. Geological Survey, 1969





DOI 
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Online 
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Citation

Roy A. Bailey,Robert Leland Smith,Clarence Samuel Ross. 1969. Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Washington D.C.: U.S. Geological Survey. 19p.