Snake River Plain Geothermal Area

Jump to: navigation, search
Snake River Plain Geothermal Area

Area Overview

The Snake River Plain is a large arcuate structural depression that characterizes the topography of southern Idaho that can be divided into three sections: western, central, and eastern. The western Snake River Plain is a large tectonic graben or rift valley filled with several km of lacustrine (lake) sediments; the sediments are underlain by rhyolite and basalt, and overlain by basalt. The western plain began to form around 11-12 Ma with the eruption of rhyolite lavas and ignimbrites. The western plain is not parallel to North American Plate motion, and lies at a high angle to the central and eastern Snake River Plains. Its morphology is similar to other volcanic plateaus such as the Chilcotin Group in south-central British Columbia, Canada. The eastern Snake River plain traces the path of the North American plate over the Yellowstone hotspot, now centered in Yellowstone National Park. The eastern plain is a topographic depression that cuts across Basin and Range Mountain structures, more or less parallel to North American plate motion. It is underlain almost entirely by basalt erupted from large shield volcanoes. Beneath the basalts are rhyolite lavas and ignimbrites that erupted as the lithosphere passed over the hotspot. The central Snake River plain is similar to the eastern plain, but differs by having thick sections of interbedded lacustrine (lake) and fluvial (stream) sediments.

History and Infrastructure

Operating Power Plants: 0

No geothermal plants listed.

Add a new Operating Power Plant

Developing Power Projects: 0

No geothermal projects listed.

Add a new Developing Power Project

Power Production Profile

Gross Production Capacity:

Net Production Capacity:

Owners  :

Power Purchasers :

Other Uses:

The eastern Snake River Plain formed as the North American Plate passed over the Yellowstone Hotspot. The upper layers are generally composed of basalt rocks interlayered with sediments. At greater depths, welded rhyolite tuff and tuffaceous sediments dominate. The area is characterized by high heat flows, elevated subsurface temperatures, and abundant water.

Regulatory and Environmental Issues

 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

Exploration History

First Discovery Well

Completion Date:

Well Name:



Initial Flow Rate:
  • "cc" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property.
  • The given value was not understood.

Flow Test Comment:

Initial Temperature:

 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

Well Field Description

Well Field Information

Development Area:

Number of Production Wells:

Number of Injection Wells:

Number of Replacement Wells:

Average Temperature of Geofluid:

Sanyal Classification (Wellhead):

Reservoir Temp (Geothermometry):

Reservoir Temp (Measured):

Sanyal Classification (Reservoir):

Depth to Top of Reservoir:

Depth to Bottom of Reservoir:

Average Depth to Reservoir:

Use the "Edit with Form" button at the top of the page to add a Well Field Description

Geology of the Area

Geologic Setting

Tectonic Setting:

Controlling Structure:

Topographic Features:

Brophy Model:

Moeck-Beardsmore Play Type:

Geologic Features

Modern Geothermal Features:

Relict Geothermal Features:

Volcanic Age:

Host Rock Age:

Host Rock Lithology:

Cap Rock Age:

Cap Rock Lithology:

 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

Geofluid Geochemistry


Salinity (low):

Salinity (high):

Salinity (average):

Brine Constituents:

Water Resistivity:

 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

NEPA-Related Analyses (0)

Below is a list of NEPA-related analyses that have been conducted in the area - and logged on OpenEI. To add an additional NEPA-related analysis, see the NEPA Database.

CSV No NEPA-related documents listed.

Exploration Activities (0)

Below is a list of Exploration that have been conducted in the area - and cataloged on OpenEI. Add.png Add a new Exploration Activity

No exploration activities listed on OpenEI.


List of existing Geothermal Resource Areas.

Print PDF