Rhode Island/EZFeed Policies

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EZ Feed Policies for Rhode Island

Download EZFeed Policies for Rhode Island CSV (rows 1 - 39)

Policy Place Policy Type Active Affected Technologies Implementing Sector Summary
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1 - Visible Emissions (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour which is greater than or equal to 20 percent opacity.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels for the relevant contaminant(s), as specified in Table I of these regulations.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which may cause any emissions of particulate matter into the atmosphere. The regulations contain a table to aid emissions calculations.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 43 - General Permits for Smaller-Scale Electric Generation Facilities (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This rule applies to any generator that: (a) has a heat input capacity of 350,000 Btus or more per hour or, in the case of internal combustion engines, is 50 HP or larger; and, (b) is not subject to or would not cause a facility to be subject to the RI major source permitting requirements. Generators whose engines are non-road engines will be exempt from compliance with the requirements of this rule. The regulations describe the permitting process, emissions standards, and monitoring requirements that must be met by these systems.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 & 47 - CO2 Budget Trading Program & Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe CO2 allowance allocations and transfers necessary to meet emissions standards.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations No Coal with CCS
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province Repealed in 2014. These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum design heat input greater than 250 mmBtu/hr. Units that possess federally enforceable permits may be exempt from these regulations.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding the handling, transportation, mining, quarrying, storing, or utilizing of materials in a way that will cause airborne particulate matter to travel beyond the property line of the emission source without taking adequate precautions to prevent particulate matter from becoming airborne. The regulations apply to activities including the construction, demolition, or renovation of buildings, bridges, or other structures; material stockpiles and earth moving activities, including land clearing; stationary sources whose activities involve the handling of materials which cause airborne particulate matter; exterior surface preparation or resurfacing operations; and others.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor with audio alarm. The devices will be calibrated to sound the alarm at 20 percent opacity and operate continuously during fuel combustion. Data from the monitoring system will be reported to the Department of Environmental Management.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or cause damage to property or which unreasonably interferes with the enjoyment of life and property. The criteria for determining compliance is listed in the regulations, and is based on other air pollution and ambient air standards.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9 - Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) Plan Requirements for high NOx emitters.
Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Climate Policies Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in response to growing international agreement that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are warming the planet at a rapid rate. Reducing greenhouse gases can help reduce global warming — a major concern for Rhode Islanders because of its potential adverse impacts such as flooding in coastal areas, saltwater contamination of drinking water, extreme weather events, and damage to local crops. In July 2002, GHG stakeholders completed Phase 1 of the project with the publication of the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Action Plan. The Action Plan outlines programs and policies the state could undertake to meet its commitment under the New England Governors' and Eastern Canadian Provincial Premiers' (NEG/ECPP) Climate Change Action Plan, August 2001. The NEG/ECPP agreement aims to reduce annual greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2010, to at least 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, and up to 85 percent below 1990 levels over the long term.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Forestry Policies (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province Rhode Island's forests cover over half of the state's land area, and are managed by the Department of Environmental Management, Division of Forest Environment. The State issued its "Forest Resources Assessment and Strategies" document in 2010( http://www.dem.ri.gov/programs/bnatres/forest/pdf/assestra.pdf), which lays out the vision, goals, policies, and objectives. Among the myriad goals of the Forest Management Plan is the sustainable use of the forest, including commercial forest products.
ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Multiple States) Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont
Generating Facility Rate-Making Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit Under the Forward Capacity Market (FCM), ISO New England projects the capacity needs of the region’s power system three years in advance and then holds an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy those future regional requirements. Resources that clear in the auction are obligated to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO. The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New England states, and industry stakeholders to promote investment in generation and demand-response resources to meet future demand. The results ensure that the region will have sufficient resources to meet future demand. Resources that clear in the auction are committed to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO, or risk financial penalties.
Job Creation Guaranty Program (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province RIEDC’s Job Creation Guaranty Program provides businesses looking to expand or relocate in Rhode Island with access to capital and credit. RIEDC guarantees loans by private lenders or guarantees bond obligations for technology and innovation-driven businesses that create high paying employment within the state.
Job Training Tax Credit (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Companies who invest in training opportunities for new or existing employees may take a corporate income tax credit equal to 50% of eligible training expenditures through the Job Training Tax Credit. Employees must be full-time and earn at least 150% of the Rhode Island minimum wage after training. Up to $5000 per employee over a three-year period is available.
New England Power Pool (Multiple States) Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
Interconnection Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit Independent System Operator (ISO) New England helps protect the health of New England's economy and the well-being of its people by ensuring the constant availability of electricity, today and for future generations. ISO New England meets this obligation in three ways: by ensuring the day-to-day reliable operation of New England's bulk power generation and transmission system, by overseeing and ensuring the fair administration of the region's wholesale electricity markets, and by managing comprehensive, regional planning processes.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Rhode Island as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont) may be lower.
Regulations for the Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations aim to protect surface water from pollutant discharges. They describe allowable discharges in the state that are subject to permits, discharges which may be made without permits, as well as discharges that are prohibited. The regulations require reports of the identity, amount, frequency, concentration, temperature, and other discharge characteristics, and establish rules for toxic discharges as well as maximum daily discharge limitations. Some exemptions to stated requirements, including exemptions for small businesses, are noted in the regulations. General permit applications exist for discharges associated with industrial activity, construction activity, and non-contact cooling water discharges.
Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration, temperature, or other characteristics (to the extent related to water quality) of any pollutant which has been discharged by the source (or of any pollutant resulting from any discharge from the source).
Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Rhode Island's stormwater design and installation standards manual has been developed to describe mandatory and suggested stormwater design and performance criteria for applicants to the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) and Rhode Island's cities and towns. This manual is meant to assist property owners, developers, engineers, consultants, contractors, municipal staff and others in planning, designing and implementing effective stormwater best management practices for the development and redevelopment of properties in Rhode Island. The manual addresses specific criteria for the site planning process, groundwater recharge, water quality, channel protection, and peak flow control requirements, as well as low impact development (LID) site planning and design strategies.
Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province The purpose of these rules is to protect public health and the environment by establishing minimum standards for the proper location, design, construction and maintenance of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) used for the treatment and dispersal of wastewater. The rules also provide for the approval of alternative or experimental technologies that may be used in conjunction with, or as an alternative to, the OWTSs and components specified herein. The rules define several critical resource areas which are deemed to be particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of nutrients, pathogenic organisms, organic chemicals and other substances that may be present in wastewater effluent. The areas, which fall under the categories of salt ponds, areas in the Narrow River watershed, and drinking water supply watersheds, are listed in section 38.3 of this document.
Rules and Regulations Governing the Establishment of Various Fees (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations describe the fees associated with several Department of Environmental Management regulatory programs, including programs pertaining to pollutant and wastewater discharge, groundwater, water quality, underground injection, well drilling, and air quality.
Rules and Regulations Pertaining to a User Fee System for Point Source Dischargers that Discharge Pollutants into the Waters of the State (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations No Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations establish a user fee system for point source dischargers that discharge pollutants into the surface waters of the State. The funds from such fees are used by the Department of Environmental Management to develop and operate a pollution monitoring system and to protect, preserve, and upgrade the surface waters into which the discharges flow. The fees hall be individually based on the need for monitoring a facility's discharge because of the potential for environmental degradation that its effluent poses.
Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Hydroelectric energy State/Province These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for reviewing dam performance. Maintenance and repair of low and high hazard dams, as well as substantial alteration and construction of new dams all require official approval. These regulations describe procedures for dam registration, hazard classification, inspection, and official approval processes.
Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
State/Province These regulations apply to dredging conducted in a marine environment. The regulations aim to ensure that dredging does not unduly impact groundwater and surface water quality while streamlining the permitting process. The regulations address both the dredging process and the dredged material, encouraging the beneficial use of this material for brownfields redevelopment, beach nourishment, landscaping, habitat restoration and/or creation, construction projects, landfill cover and other useful purposes. The regulations list sites suitable for beneficial use and/or disposal of dredged material, and establish criteria for identifying other suitable sites.
Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province These regulations assert the Department of Environmental Management's authority to administer and enforce the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (R.I. Gen. Laws, ch. 2-1-18 through 2-1-25), and describe standards which aim to preserve, protect, and restore the purity and integrity of all freshwater wetlands in Rhode Island. The regulations assert the Department's right to restrict development around freshwater resources and to remove dams that are in a state of disrepair and may pose hazards to the public. Proposed projects or activities which may alter any freshwater wetland may not be undertaken without a permit from the Department, but some exemptions apply.
Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as drinking water and other beneficial uses, and to assure protection of the public health and welfare and the environment.
Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Fuel Cells
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize environmental hazards associated with the generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous wastes, including the hazardous waste component of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste (mixed waste), the transportation of septage, and the operation of hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities.
Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in a manner to protect public health and to avoid degradation of the environment. To achieve this purpose, these rules and regulations establish procedures governing the management of sludge. The regulations contain specific references to aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes.
Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Nuclear
State/Province These regulations apply to underground storage facilities for petroleum and hazardous waste, and seek to protect water resources from contamination. The regulations establish procedures for the remediation of contaminated sites as well as siting, design, installation, operating, and monitoring requirements for underground tank systems.
Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water resources, the environment, and human health, and to restore contaminated areas to encourage business development.
Rules for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other Fluids To or Below the Ground Surface (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province The purpose of these rules to protect and preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State of Rhode Island (the “State”) and to prevent contamination of groundwater resources from the discharge of non-sanitary wastewater or other fluid to or below the ground surface.
Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific facility requirements include standards for equipment and drainage locations.
The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Enterprise Zone Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new employee, or up to 75% for an employee who resides in the enterprise zone. The maximum credit is $5000 per employee.
The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Jobs Development Act provides an incremental reduction in the corporate income tax rate (9%) to companies creating jobs in Rhode Island. For every ten new jobs created for companies with fewer than 100 employees, companies can reduce the tax by a quarter percentage point. For companies with more than 100 employees, a quarter percentage point can be deducted for every fifty new jobs created. The tax may be reduced to as low as 3%.
Underground Injection Control Program Rules and Regulations (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province The purpose of this regulation is to preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State and thereby protect groundwater contamination from contamination by discharge from injection wells and other subsurface waste disposal of hazardous and other wastes. It is the policy of the Department of Environmental Management to assure the proper location, design, construction, maintenance and operation of injection wells and other subsurface disposal systems to prevent such groundwater contamination.
Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The purpose of these regulations is to establish water quality standards for the state's surface waters. These standards are intended to restore, preserve and enhance the physical, chemical and biological integrity of the waters of the state, to maintain existing water uses, and to protect waters from pollutants. The regulations provide criteria for freshwater and saltwater, as well as standards for oxygen dissolved in saltwater, and describe ambient water quality classifications and special resource protection waters.