Retrofit the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter’s building’s aging boiler/chiller equipment with a geothermal system Geothermal Project

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Last modified on July 22, 2011.

Project Title Retrofit the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter’s building’s aging boiler/chiller equipment with a geothermal system
Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act – Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps
Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects

Project Description Retrofit the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter’s building’s aging boiler/chiller equipment with a geothermal system that would utilize ground water trapped inside the Panther Creek #2 Mine which is located approximately 200 feet directly below the building at Camp Lincoln, Illinois. Approximately 1.76 million tons of coal were removed from the mine between 1927 and 1948 and the mine surface area covers over three square miles.

Under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, President Bush’s 2007 Executive Order 13423, Illinois Governor Quinn’s Executive Order Number 11 (2009) and its own green initiative, the Illinois National Guard is mandated to substantially reduce its energy usage. Low level geothermal energy is attractive and has recently been used by the Guard in a new armory in Mount Vernon, Illinois. However, it has proven to be cost prohibitive for retrofit operations based on cost-benefit payback periods that fall outside of current National Guard Bureau’s guidelines. Therefore, this project seeks to demonstrate that building retrofit costs for low level geothermal energy can be significantly lowered by utilizing abandoned subsurface mines. The Panther Creek Mine #2 is considered to be a good candidate for several reasons including stability over the last 82 years, the location within a major floodplain (water source) and directly under the target building (and campus), the depth of the formation (approximately 200 feet).

The system is expected to save almost $40,000 per year or over 275,600 kWh over the existing system within the Headquarters building alone. In addition, the amount of potential energy in such that the project can be expanded to other facilities on Camp Lincoln, including a new Combined Service Maintenance Support (CSMS) structure to be constructed in 2016 and a replacement armory currently on the facility’s master plan, both projects which are expected to have a much greater savings over conventional HVAC systems. If successful, it is expected that the methodologies, cost-benefit analysis and resolutions of legal issues within the state can be applied to other similar projects in the state.

State Illinois
Objectives Demonstrate that building retrofit costs for low level geothermal energy can be significantly lowered by utilizing a resource that Illinois has in abundance – over 5,500 abandoned subsurface mines.
Awardees (Company / Institution) Department of Military Affairs

Awardee Website http://www.il.ngb.army.mil/











Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000116

DOE Funding Level (total award amount) $1,200,000.00
Awardee Cost Share $400,000.00
Total Project Cost $1,600,000.00



Principal Investigator(s) Mark Lee, Military Energy Manager


Targets / Milestones The project seeks to address several key issues that have hampered the use of this type of geothermal operation including the following:

- Developing methodology for determining mine water quality and quantity; - Determining legal issues related to ownership, liability and permitting requirements; - Determining the best energy recovery systems that balance cost with environmental or other concerns; - Estimating scalability for campus use; - Developing alternative plans and emergency planning for potential changes in mine water availability and temperature - Publishing a methodology for exploiting this resource across the state of Illinois.





Location of Project Bloomington, IL
40.4842027°, -88.9936873°



Impacts Project will examine the potential for heat exchange with abandoned mines, which may improve cost-effectiveness for the technology in regions that offer similar opportunities.
Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

References EERE Geothermal Technologies Programs[1]

References

  1. EERE Geothermal Technologies Programs