Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

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Journal Article: Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

Abstract
A borehole has been drilled to a depth of 1262 m (4141 ft) beneath the summit of Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii. The purpose was to test predictions made from surface-based geophysical surveys and seek evidence of a hydrothermal system over a known magma body. Nearly all rocks penetrated by the borehole are olivine basalt, with minor amounts of olivine diabase, picrite diabase and olivine-poor basalt. While the rocks are petrographically uniform, their physical properties vary widely from flow to flow. Core samples have progressively more thermal and chemical alteration with increasing depth. The temperature distribution in the wellbore is strongly affected by fluid convection. The temperature distribution can be simulated by two-dimensional convection having half-cell dimensions of 700 by 700 m. However, the match is improved by assuming that heat transport takes place by conduction in the lower half, while convective heat transfer dominates the upper half.

Authors 
George V. Keller, L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray and Catherine K. Skokan








Published Journal 
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1979





DOI 
Not Provided
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Citation

George V. Keller,L. Trowbridge Grose,John C. Murray,Catherine K. Skokan. 1979. Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. (!) .