RAPID/Hydropower/Vermont/Power Plant

Jump to: navigation, search

RAPID

Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit

Vermont Hydropower Facilility Licensing, Certification, Safety, & Regulation(7-VT)

In Vermont, a hydropower developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Good from the Vermont Public Service Board for transmission line extension projects, interconnected group net-metered hydroelectric power systems, and projects that sell retail electricity within Vermont. A small hydropower developer may qualify for an expedited permitting process under Vermont’s Small Hydropower Assistance Program.

More Information

Determine Which State and Federal Permits Apply

Use this overview flowchart and following steps to learn which federal and state permits apply to your projects.

Permitting at a Glance

Vermont Federal

Certificate of Public Good/Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (Certificate): A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Good (CPG) from the Vermont Public Service Board for a transmission line extension project, or an interconnected group net-metered hydroelectric power system. The Board will review the proposed project on a site-specific basis analyzing the environmental, economic and social impacts of the proposed project before issuing a CPG.
Certificate Regulatory Agency: Vermont Public Service Board
Certificate Threshold: A developer before beginning construction of transmission line extension projects, outside of FERC's jurisdiction, interconnected group net-metered hydroelectric power systems, and project's that sell retail electricity within Vermont may need to obtain a CPG.
Small Hydropower Program: Vermont’s Small Hydropower Assistance Program is an optional program that provides enhanced assistance from the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, the Vermont Public Service Department and the Vermont State Historic Preservation Office of the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, for small, low-impact projects. The Program is designed to provide an expedited review process for small-low-impact hydroelectric projects in accordance with the Small Hydropower Assistance Program. [1][2]
Small Hydropower Program Regulatory Agency: Vermont Department of Public Service
Small Hydropower Definition: Proposals for new hydroelectric projects, in Vermont, that meet the Small Hydropower Screening Criteria for limited resource impacts may be eligible for the Vermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program.

A developer must demonstrate that the project meets all of the following criteria to qualify for a multi-agency site visit:

  1. The project will not be located on Class A waters, Outstanding Resource Waters, or federal or state protected river reaches. A list of Class A and Outstanding Resource Waters is available on the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural Resources Atlas;
  2. The project will be located at an existing dam, or the project will not require a dam or other impoundment;
  3. The project will be located on lands controlled by the applicant (developer) or will otherwise demonstrate support from adjoining landowners;
  4. The project will not increase the impoundment elevation;
  5. The project will be operated as a true run-of river project. “A true run-of-river project is one which does not operate out of storage and, therefore, does not artificially regulate streamflows below the project’s trailrace. Outflow from the project is equal to inflow to the project’s impoundment on an instantaneous basis.” Vermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program Screening Criteria Summary and Application Instructions;
  6. The project will have proposed bypass flows that will meet hydrologic standards as defined by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Procedure for Determining Acceptable Minimum Stream Flows and Questions and Answers on the New England Flow Policy. OR
  1. Where the project creates virtually no bypass (tailrace discharges at the dam or into plunge pool close to the dam such that adequate circulation is maintained) and will have a spillage proposal of at least 7Q10 drought flow. “7Q10 refers to the lowest average streamflow expected to occur for seven consecutive days with an average frequency of once in ten years. If the stream is a gaged stream, ANR can supply this statistic. If not, use 0.1 csm, the statewide value.”
[3]
Renewable Portfolio Standard Process (RPS): Vermont requires all utilities procure 75% of their retail sales from eligible renewable energy resources by 2032.
RPS Eligible: Hydroelectric facilities with a generating capacity of 200 MW or less.
RPS Regulatory Agency: New England GIS [4]

Contact Information

Edit Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Regional Office Hydropower Contacts


Visit Website

| Add a Contact

List of Reference Sources

  1. Vermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program Overview Small Hydropower Assistance ProgramVermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program Site-Specific Determinations Summary
  2. Vermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program Screening Criteria Summary and Application Instructions New England GIS
Print PDF