RAPID/Geothermal/Nevada/Transmission

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Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit

Nevada Geothermal Transmission & Interconnection(8-NV)

Developers may require a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity or a Special Use Permit when constructing transmission lines in Nevada.

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity

Developers of transmission lines and facilities are included under the regulation of public utilities in Nevada, and as such must obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) from the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada (PUC) if they qualify as a “public utility.” The term “public utility” includes “any plant or equipment, or any part of a plant or equipment, within this State for the production, delivery or furnishing for or to other persons, including private or municipal corporations, heat, gas, coal slurry, light, power in any form or by any agency, water for business, manufacturing, agricultural or household use, or sewerage service, whether or not within the limits of municipalities.” NRS 704.020(2)(a). The PUC is required to provide a 30 day public comment period on the application, and developers may be required to participate in a pre-hearing conference if a motion is filed. NAC 703.492. The PUC must conduct a public hearing for any CPCN application filed by an electric utility, and developers may need to file additional information. NRS 704.370(3). The PUC may approve or deny a request for a CPCN. NAC 703.486(3).

Special Use Permit

Developers must obtain a Special Use Permit prior to initiating the construction of a transmission line located outside an above ground utility corridor. The process for obtaining special use permits for the construction of transmission lines in Nevada is delegated to counties and municipalities, so developers should consult with local governments to determine specific application requirements. The Public Utilities Commission of Nevada (PUC) handles review of local government decisions regarding the approval or denial of special use permits. NRS 238.26506(1). If the PUC, following review, decides that a permit should not be issued, then developers may seek judicial review of the decision. NRS 703.373 (1)-(7).

More Information

Determine Which State and Federal Permits Apply

Use this overview flowchart and following steps to learn which federal and state permits apply to your projects.

Permitting at a Glance

Nevada Federal

Transmission Siting Agency: Public Utilities Commission of Nevada Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Transmission Siting: Special Use Permit if outside an above ground utility corridor. [1]
Public Utility Definition for Transmission Facility: The term “public utility” includes “any plant or equipment, or any part of a plant or equipment, within this State for the production, delivery or furnishing for or to other persons, including private or municipal corporations, heat, gas, coal slurry, light, power in any form or by any agency, water for business, manufacturing, agricultural or household use, or sewerage service, whether or not within the limits of municipalities.” NRS 704.020(2)(a). [2]
Public Utility Regulatory Authority Certification Transmission Threshold: None [2]

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List of Reference Sources

  1. Nevada NRS 704.865, Utility Facility Permit Requirements (2007).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Nevada NRS 704.860, Utility Facility Definition (2009).
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