Quantification Of Exhumation From Sonic Velocity Data, Cooper Basin, Australia, And Implications For Hydrocarbon Exploration

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Journal Article: Quantification Of Exhumation From Sonic Velocity Data, Cooper Basin, Australia, And Implications For Hydrocarbon Exploration

Abstract
Exhumation (defined as rock uplift minus surface uplift) in the Cooper Basin of South Australia and Queensland has been quantified using the compaction methodology. The sonic log, which is strongly controlled by the amount of porosity, is an appropriate indicator of compaction, and hence is used for quantifying exhumation from compaction. The traditional way of estimating exhumation based on the degree of overcompaction of a single shale unit has been modified and five units ranging in age from Permian to Triassic have been analysed. The results reveal that exhumation increases eastwards from the South Australia into the Queensland sector of the basin. The results show that exhumation in Late Triassic - Early Jurassic times, after the Cooper Basin deposition, seems to be 200-400 m higher than exhumation in Late Cretaceous - Tertiary times, after the Eromanga Basin deposition. This study has major implications for hydrocarbon exploration. Maturation of source rocks will be greater for any given geothermal history if exhumation is incorporated in maturation modelling. Exhumation values can also be used to improve porosity predictions of reservoir units in undrilled targets.

Author 
A. Mavromatidis








Published Journal 
Surveys in Geophysics, 2006





DOI 
Not Provided
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Citation

A. Mavromatidis. 2006. Quantification Of Exhumation From Sonic Velocity Data, Cooper Basin, Australia, And Implications For Hydrocarbon Exploration. Surveys in Geophysics. (!) .