Preliminary Geologic Map of the Redondo Peak Quadrangle, Sandoval County, New Mexico

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Map: Preliminary Geologic Map of the Redondo Peak Quadrangle, Sandoval County, New Mexico

The Redondo Peak 7.5 minute quadrangle is in Sandoval County and straddles the southern rim of the Valles caldera in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico (Fig. 1). Topographically, the quadrangle is bounded by Redondo Peak on the north, the Banco Bonito plateau and Cat Mesa on the west, Valle Grande on the northeast, and a series of north-trending canyons and ridges to the south and southeast (San Juan Canyon, Peralta Ridge, etc.). Geologically, the quadrangle consists of three domains: the resurgent dome of Valles caldera in the north; the southern moat of Valles caldera in the center; and a part of the Jemez Mountains volcanic field to the south. Each domain has unique geology as described below. The relatively new Valles Caldera National Preserve occupies the northern half of the quadrangle. Before 2000, the Preserve belonged to the Baca Land and Cattle Company of Abilene, Texas. Access to the Preserve is restricted and must be obtained through the headquarters in Los Alamos, about 30 miles to the east. The southern half of the quadrangle is part of the Santa Fe National Forest. Small but significant private lands occur in the Vallecitos de los Indios area south of New Mexico Highway 4 and east and west of Forest Service road 10, and in scattered areas within forest service lands. Most areas of the quadrangle can be visited by dirt roads. The southeast corner of the quadrangle is rather remote and is best accessed by trails.The quadrangle was once home to pre-Columbian Indian cultures (Paleo-Indian, Archaic, and ancestral Puebloan), Spanish land grants, homesteads and scattered ranches. In 1860 the Baca #1 land grant incorporating the present Valles Caldera National Preserve was given to the heirs of Luis Maria Cabeza de Vaca by passage of an act to settle disputed land claims in the Territory of New Mexico (Martin, 2003). Frank Bond purchased the 'Baca' in 1926 and his heirs sold it to the Baca Land and Cattle Company (James P. Dunnigan) in 1962. Presently, the Preserve is managed for limited public recreation, and for elk hunting, cattle grazing, fishing, and scientific study. Timber is harvested and pumice is mined on National Forest lands. Geothermal energy was explored but not developed on both Preserve and National Forest lands in the 1960s to 1980s. Due to presence of the Bland gold mining district to the east, precious metal exploration has been conducted sporadically on National Forest lands from the late 1800s to the present, but no successful metallic mines have been established on the quadrangle.The objectives of the present study are to provide detailed geologic mapping for the Valles Caldera National Preserve and to contribute quadrangle maps for the New Mexico State Map Program. The geology of the quadrangle was primarily mapped in the summer and fall months of 2003 and 2004. Regional geology and stratigraphy have been previously published by Griggs (1964), Bailey et al. (1969), Smith et al. (1970), Kelley (1978), Gardner (1985), Gardner and Goff (1984) and Gardner et al. (1986). Adjacent and nearby NM State Map quadrangles have been published by Goff et al. (2002), Kempter and Kelley (2002), Osburn et al. (2002), and Kelley et al. (2003).

Fraser E. Goff, Jamie N. Gardner, Steven L. Reneau and Cathy J. Goff

New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, 2006

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Fraser E. Goff,Jamie N. Gardner,Steven L. Reneau,Cathy J. Goff. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Redondo Peak Quadrangle, Sandoval County, New Mexico. [Map]. Place of publication not provided. New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources. 2006. Scale 1:24,000. Available from: