Pennsylvania/EZFeed Policies

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EZ Feed Policies for Pennsylvania

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Policy Place Policy Type Active Affected Technologies Implementing Sector Summary
Air Quality Regulations (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The Air Quality Program regulates more than 70,000 inspection points such as pollution control devices, boilers, fuels and paints at 3,650 facilities that produce air pollution in Pennsylvania. The program administers the rules and regulations of the Pennsylvania Air Pollution Control Act and the Pennsylvania Code. The Code has specific regulations for coal-fired combustion units, natural gas, and other potential pollutants.
Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Grant Program No Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ben Franklin Technology Partner's Challenge Grant and Alternative Energy Development Program (AEDP) provides funds to businesses through the four Ben Franklin Technology Partners for access to capital, business expertise, technology commercialization services to advance the development of new technologies and for the generation, conservation, and transportation of alternative and clean energy. The BFTDA Centers receive funding to award to entrepreneurs, start-up and early-stage companies, established companies, investors, higher education and research and BFTP alumni companies. Grants may be used for direct company investments, business and technical support, technology and entrepreneurial infrastructure, and administrative expenses. For further information and program requirements, please see the guidelines: BenFranklinTechnologyPartners_Guidelines_10-2.pdf.
Chesapeake Bay Preservation Programs (Multiple States) Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
Washington D.C.
Siting and Permitting Yes Biomass/Biogas
Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Solar Photovoltaics
Wave Energy
Wind energy
State/Province The Chesapeake Bay Program is a unique regional partnership that has led and directed the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay since 1983. The Chesapeake Bay Program partners include the states of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia; the District of Columbia; the Chesapeake Bay Commission, a tri-state legislative body; the Environmental Protection Agency, representing the federal government; and participating citizen advisory groups.

The Chesapeake Executive Council was established by the Chesapeake Bay Agreement of 1983. Under the 1987 Chesapeake Bay Agreement, membership changed from cabinet secretaries to the governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia; the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; the mayor of the District of Columbia; and the chair of the Chesapeake Bay Commission, a legislative body serving Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

The Council: (a) Establishes the policy direction for the restoration and protection of the Bay and its living resources; (b) Exerts leadership to marshal public support for the Bay effort; (c) Signs directives, agreements and amendments that set goals and guide policy for Bay restoration; and (d) Is accountable to the public for progress made under the Bay agreements.

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality administers complementary programs and regulations to prevent future pollution and degradation of the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding lands. More information can be found here: http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/ChesapeakeBay.aspx
Climate Action Plan (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Climate Policies Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Office of Pollution Prevention and Energy Assistance works with citizen's groups, businesses, trade organizations, local governments and communities to help them reduce pollution and save energy. In addition, the office works to foster and develop alternative energy solutions. Part of that effort includes encouraging the deployment and use of innovative environmental and advanced energy technologies, including renewable energy.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Dam Safety (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the health, safety and welfare of its citizens and their property. This division is required to assure proper planning, design review, construction review, maintenance monitoring and supervision of dams and reservoirs. This requirement is mandated by the Dam Safety and Encroachments Act, as amended, and the Pennsylvania Code. The division directs and coordinates field investigations with regional offices on authorized projects during construction; provides program guidance and coordination to regional program staff in the periodic inspection of all existing dams to determine their condition and safety; and directs, coordinates and develops policies and technical standards in the area of dam safety for the Department.
Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes Hydroelectric energy State/Province This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to be prepared and implemented by owners and also requires monitoring, inspection and reporting of conditions affecting the safety of dams, water obstructions and encroachments. No person is authorized to construct, operate, maintain, modify, enlarge or abandon any dam, water obstruction or encroachment without the prior written permit of the department.
Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
New York
Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware). Its five members include the basin state governors and the Division Engineer, North Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who serves as the federal representative. The commission has legal authority over both water quality and water quantity-related issues throughout the basin.

Much of the new drilling interest taking place in northeastern Pennsylvania and southern New York is targeted at reaching the natural gas found in the Marcellus Shale formation, which underlies about 36 percent of the Delaware River Basin.

In connection with natural gas drilling, the commission has identified three major areas of concern:

1) Gas drilling projects in the Marcellus Shale or other formations may have a substantial effect on the water resources of the basin by reducing the flow in streams and/or aquifers used to supply the significant amounts of fresh water needed in the natural gas mining process. 2) On-site drilling operations may potentially add, discharge or cause the release of pollutants into the ground water or surface water. 3) The recovered "frac water" must be treated and disposed of properly.

While the Delaware River itself is un-dammed, there are 13 dams within the basin that feed into the river. The Commission holds authority to approve any project that will have a substantial effect on the water resources of the basin.

The Commission also has approval authority over energy projects that need to draw water from the basin, including coal plants, biomass plants, and natural gas extraction and power plants.
Forestry Policies (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province Pennsylvania has over 17 million acres of forests, managed by the State Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Forestry. The Department issued in 2010 its Strategic Plan "Sustaining our Forests", which mentions the policy of providing assistance in diversifying and improving local economies and in stimulating jobs through the use of renewable forest resources:

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/stateforestmanagement/sfrmp/index.htm

The Department provides a number of resources, guidelines, and leasing policy information related to natural gas extraction on forested lands:

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/NaturalGas/index.htm
Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state) Illinois
Indiana
Minnesota
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Ontario
Quebec
Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Energy Storage
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council, which is responsible for water conservation and efficiency programs and reviewing proposed projects. Projects which may lead to new or increased water diversions are limited; exceptions are described in this statute. More information can be found on the website of the Council: http://www.glslcompactcouncil.org/
Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Grant Program
Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the financial resources needed to plan and implement timely and effective responses to the release of hazardous substances and contaminants, including emergency response actions, studies and investigations, planning, remedial response, maintenance and monitoring activities, replacement of water supplies and protection of the public from the hazardous site. The fund also allows the Department to administer grants for the purchase or lease of recycling equipment to eliminate hazardous waste by reclamation into a usable product.
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia
Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
Yes Biomass/Biogas
Coal with CCS
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Local The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate cooperation. The IPCRB administers an interstate compact, authorized by Congress in 1940, which aims to help the Potomac basin states and the federal government to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River basin. The Commission is responsible for regulating and controlling pollution impacts and water uses. The Commission provides planning coordination for the development and use of the water and associated land resources through cooperation with, and support and coordination of, the activities of federal, state, local and private agencies, groups, and interests concerned with the development, utilization and conservation of the water and associated land resources.
Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) Alabama
Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Missouri
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact is administered by the Interstate Mining Compact Commission, which does not possess regulatory powers but “provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states” and thus aids the development of effective regulatory programs and environmental protection initiatives. The Commission exercises several powers on behalf of the states, all of which are of a study, recommendatory or consultative nature. The Commission does not possess regulatory powers, as some Compacts do. The Commission provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states. It is the potential to stimulate the development and production of each state's mineral wealth through effective regulatory programs that draws many of the states together in the prosecution of the Commission's work. Given the environmental sensitivities associated with this objective, a significant portion of the Commission's work is dedicated to the environmental protection issues naturally associated with this mineral development. It is the significant value and clout that comes from "compacting" together and speaking with a strong, united voice that can make a difference in each state's efforts to implement effective regulatory programs that will conserve natural resources and secure a vibrant state (and thus national) mineral economy.
Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas
Utah
Virginia
West Virginia
Wyoming
Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health, safety and the environment.

The Commission serves as the collective voice of member governors on oil and gas issues and advocates states' rights to govern petroleum resources within their borders.

The Commission formed the Geological CO2 Sequestration Task Force, which examines the technical, policy and regulatory issues related to safe and effective storage of CO2 in the subsurface (depleted oil and natural gas fields, saline formations and coal beds).

The Commission also funds research on hydraulic fracking, reusing water used in extracting oil and gas, and makes recommendations on national energy policies and statutes for individual states.

The Commission also has several associate states: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. In addition, it has international affiliations with the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon.
Job Creation Tax Credits Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Job Creation Tax Credits Program can be used to offset business tax liabilities and is available to businesses that create 25 or more jobs or increase employment by 20% within three years of a negotiated start date. Every new full-time job results in a $1000 tax credit.
Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Enterprise Zone
Corporate Tax Incentive
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program provides tax credits to companies less than eight years old who operate within designated innovation zones. A total pool of $25 million in tax credits is available each year to businesses within these zones. A business can claim a tax credit up to 50% of the increase in gross revenues attributable to activities within innovation zones. The tax credit limit is $100,000 per business per year. Keystone Innovation Zones (KIZs) are designated zones that may be established in communities that host institutions of higher education – colleges, universities, and associate degree technical schools. These zones are designed to foster innovation and create entrepreneurial opportunities. They do this by gathering and aligning the combined resources of educational institutions, private businesses, business support organizations, commercial lending institutions, venture capital networks (including angel investors), and foundations (KIZ partners) In other words, where a partnership of these organizations is formed, a KIZ is possible.
Keystone Opportunity Zones (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Enterprise Zone
Property Tax Incentive
Sales Tax Incentive
Corporate Tax Incentive
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Keystone Opportunity Zones allows businesses located within designated areas to qualify for a tax exemption, deduction, credit, or abatement of state and local taxes such as sales and use tax, corporate net income tax, and property tax.
Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Nuclear State/Province This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at any municipal landfill or commercial incinerator is prohibited.

Records must be maintained for facilities and operations that generate, transport, handle, manage or dispose of low-level waste to identify the volume and radioactivity content of low-level waste generated and shipped, the method of transportation, the origin and disposition of such low-level waste, and submit reports to the Department of Environmental Protection quarterly, listing the quantities, types and classes of low-level waste generated during a particular time period.

Separation of all low-level radioactive wastes must be done in accordance with the waste classification system established by the Department. Potentially suitable sites shall not have any slopes for the disposal area of more than 15~oas mapped on a scale of 1:24,000 with a contour interval of either 10 or 20 feet as available on published U.S.G.S. 7.5 minute quadrangles. Shallow land burial is prohibited. An above-land grade facility is required. The facility shall have the goal of a zero release capacity.
Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Fees
Yes Nuclear State/Province This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses incurred by the regional facility operator for regional facility site selection, regional facility design and land purchase activities, but not to include any profit; or for fees paid by the department to consultants for the purpose of assisting the department in the implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act.
Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes grants to counties and municipalities for planning, resource recovery and recycling; imposes and collects fees and requires municipalities to implement recycling programs. The department shall not issue any approval or permit for a resource recovery facility under the Solid Waste Management Act, unless the applicant has provided the department with adequate documentation and assurances that all ash residue produced from or by a resource recovery facility will be disposed at a permitted landfill. Prior to the approval of any permit application for a resource recovery facility, the operator shall submit a plan to the department for the alternate disposal of municipal waste designated for disposal at the resource recovery facility. The department shall not issue any approval or permit for a resource recovery facility unless the applicant has provided the department with a study that documents the short-term and long-term effects that the facility will have on the public and private water supply. The department shall not issue a permit for, nor allow the operation of, a new municipal waste landfill, a new commercial residual waste treatment facility or a new resource recovery facility within 300 yards of a building which is owned by a school district or a parochial school and used for instructional purposes, parks or playgrounds existing prior to the date the department has received an administratively complete application for a permit for such facilities.
Natural Gas Competition Law (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes Natural Gas State/Province This act aims to regulate the distribution system for natural gas by utility companies in terms of contracts, costs, tariff structures and competition. These regulations include minimum standards for the construction, testing, corrosion protection, operation, release prevention, and repair and reuse of storage tanks, periodic inspection of the leak detection systems, release prevention measures and an annual registration fee to be paid by owners of storage tanks. The Office of Competitive Market Oversight (OCMO)oversees competition in the retail natural gas supply market. OCMO promotes the development of the competitive retail natural gas market. OCMO also facilitates the resolution of disputes between natural distribution companies (NGDCs) and natural gas suppliers (NGSs) and provides a forum for informally addressing obstacles faced by NGSs in participating in the retail market.
Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes Nuclear State/Province The Nuclear Safety Division conducts a comprehensive nuclear power plant oversight review program of the nine reactors at the five nuclear power sites in Pennsylvania. It also monitors the activities associated with management and disposal of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Pennsylvania and provides planning and support for Bureau response to incidents involving nuclear power plants and/or radioactive material in Pennsylvania. This oversight responsibility includes routine site visits and safety review activities, off-hour surveillance, review of all license amendments, evaluation of generic and specific nuclear safety issues, participation in nuclear power plant emergency exercises, and the inspection of radioactive waste shipments. The Radiation Protection Act established a fee system which requires the nuclear utilities in Pennsylvania to pay for the costs associated with the implementation of this program. Each nuclear utility pays to the Department an annual amount of $550,000 per reactor site. There are currently nine operating nuclear power plants on five different sites in the Commonwealth.
Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States) Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia
Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas
Coal with CCS
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission representing eight states and the federal government. ORSANCO operates programs to improve water quality in the Ohio River and its tributaries, including: setting waste water discharge standards; performing biological assessments; monitoring for the chemical and physical properties of the waterways; and conducting special surveys and studies. ORSANCO also coordinates emergency response activities for spills or accidental discharges to the river, and promotes public participation in programs, such as the Ohio River Sweep and the RiverWatchers Volunteer Monitoring Program. ORSANCO sets Pollution Control Standards for industrial and municipal waste water discharges to the Ohio River, and tracks certain dischargers whose effluent can seriously impact water quality. The standards designate specific uses for the Ohio, and establish guidelines to ensure that the river is capable of supporting these uses. To keep pace with current issues, ORSANCO reviews the standards every three years. As part of the review process, workshops and public hearings are held for public input.
Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Siting and Permitting Yes Natural Gas State/Province This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not guarantee the lessor at least one-eighth royalty of all oil, natural gas or gas of other designations removed or recovered from the subject real property.
Opportunity Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Grant Program No Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Opportunity Grant Program provides funding to public and private enterprises. Eligible private companies and developers must maintain operations at a Pennsylvania site, invest private capital at the site, create or preserve jobs at the site, and operate the project site for a minimum of five years. The grant may be used for machinery and equipment, working capital, training, real estate, facilities, site preparation, and environmental assessment. The maximum amount available is $5000 per job created or retained.
PJM Interconnection (Multiple States) Delaware
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Maryland
Michigan
New Jersey
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia
District of Columbia
Interconnection Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit PJM (originally Pennsylvania, Jersey, Maryland) Interconnection is a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity in all or parts of Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. The PJM region has an area of 214,000 square miles, a population of about 60 million and a peak demand of 163,848 megawatts.
Pennsylvania Capital Access Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Pennsylvania Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees for all businesses for the purchase of land, buildings, machinery, equipment and working capital through participating banks. The program guarantees loans up to $500,000 but the conditions vary with each bank.
Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Siting and Permitting Yes Natural Gas State/Province This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in agricultural and forest reserve areas. Land identified under the provisions of this act may be leased or otherwise devoted to the exploration for and removal of gas and oil, including the extraction of coal bed methane, and the development of associated facilities, including new roads and bridges, pipelines and other buildings or structures, related to exploration for and removal of gas and oil and the extraction of coal bed methane.
Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Local Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not permitted in other classifications. Land use constraints in the watersheds of designated Scenic Rivers is also restricted and subject to the approval of management organizations and the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Individual organizations manage each Scenic River through the authorization and oversight of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. For a list of managing organizations, visit: http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/brc/conservation/rivers/scenicrivers/riversprograminformation/srmanagingorganizations/index.htm
Pennsylvania Solid Waste - Resource Recovery Development Act Pennsylvania Public Benefits Fund
Environmental Regulations
Grant Program
Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The act also provides means for financial assistance to municipalities, and development agencies in the planning and development of resource recovery and solid waste disposal/processing programs.
Pipeline Safety (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes Natural Gas State/Province The Pennsylvania legislature has empowered the Public Utility Commission to direct and enforce safety standards for pipeline facilities and to regulate safety practices of certificated utilities engaged in the transportation of natural gas and other gas by pipeline.

The Commission is authorized to enforce federal safety standards as an agent for the U.S. Department of Transportation's Office of Pipeline Safety. The safety standards apply to the design, installation, operation, inspection, testing, construction, extension, replacement and maintenance of pipeline facilities. The PUC may prescribe additional pipeline safety standards over and above federal standards, provided they are not in conflict.

Whenever the Commission uncovers pipeline safety violations, it is empowered to direct the utility to take necessary steps to correct the violation.

The PUC investigates all methods or practices of pipeline companies, including reports, records and other information. PUC investigators inspect the property, buildings, plants and offices of the pipeline companies and inspect books, records, paper, email and documents relevant to the enforcement of the rules and regulations.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Wind energy
Coal with CCS
Nuclear
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Pennsylvania as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (Indiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Virginia) may be lower.
Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes Nuclear State/Province This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of Environmental Resources to implement a comprehensive statewide radiation protection program. The Act also provides for radiation emergency response, establishes requirements for transport of spent reactor fuel, and establishes fees and penalties.
Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal waste management systems in their jurisdictions to the Department of Environmental Protection. It provides for the Department to regulate the management of municipal, residual and hazardous waste, and requires permits for operating hazardous waste and solid waste storage, processing, treatment, and disposal facilities. Licenses are also required for transportation of hazardous waste.
Stormwater Management Act (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The policy and purpose of this act is to encourage planning and management of storm water runoff in each watershed consistent with sound water and land use practices.

The act authorizes a comprehensive program of storm water management designated to preserve and restore the flood carrying capacity of Commonwealth streams. The Department of Environmental Protection is charged with the protection and conservation of ground waters and ground-water recharge areas.

The act also encourages local administration and management of storm water.
Stormwater Management Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Stormwater Management program of the Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Conservation and Restoration administers the rules and regulations for stormwater management for Pennsylvania. Regulations include establishing best management practices for erosion and sediment control, and restoration of sites that have been disturbed, including from utility infrastructure. The program also requires an Erosion and Sediment Control Permit for natural gas activities. The regulations exempt gas and mining activities from setbacks from riparian buffers, as long as a restoration and remediation plan is in place for the site. The program's Comprehensive Stormwater Management Policy provides a framework for the integration of all Department of Environmental Protection stormwater management programs and promotes a comprehensive watershed approach to stormwater management in the Commonwealth. This policy identifies and integrates existing legal requirements and post construction stormwater management planning goals, objectives and recommended procedures to the various Department stormwater management programs.
Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Guarantee Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Guarantee Program provides credit enhancement to improve market access and lower capital costs through loan guarantees to bond issuers to assist in the development and revitalization of Brownfield and Greenfield sites. Private developers must create a certain number of permanent FT jobs within the financing district. TIF projects will be guaranteed up to $5 million per project.
The Clean Streams Law (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province The statute seeks to preserve and improve the purity of the waters of the Commonwealth, providing protection of water supply and water quality, imposing certain penalties, regulating discharges of sewage and industrial wastes and regulating the impact of mining on water quality. All fines, penalties and permit fees collected under the provision of this act will be paid to a special fund called "The Clean Water Fund," which will be used for the elimination of pollution. No municipality or person is permitted to discharge sewage into water unless authorized to do so. All plans for the construction of any new sewer system or for the extension of an existing system have to be approved before construction can begin.
Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin) Wisconsin Siting and Permitting Yes Nuclear Local Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water use permits exist: a general permit is required for withdrawals that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period but do not equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. An individual permit is required for withdrawals that equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. There are no permit application fees.
Water Use Registration and Reporting (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations Yes Hydroelectric energy State/Province Chapter 110 applies to public water supply agencies (defined as community water systems) and hydropower facilities, irrespective of the amount of withdrawal, and any person whose total withdrawal from one or more points of withdrawal within a watershed operated as a system either concurrently or sequentially exceeds an average rate of 10,000 gallons per day of water in any 30-day period. Those persons who obtain their water through an interconnection with another person in an amount that exceeds an average rate of 100,000 gpd in any 30-day period also must register. Registrants must annually report their water usage and other information and retain records for at least 5 years.
Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Established by The Wild Resource Conservation Act of 1982, the Wild Resource Conservation Program is a part of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The program works closely with the Pennsylvania Game Commission and Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission to conduct and support research, conservation and education projects focused on preserving Pennsylvania’s biodiversity. The program has developed County Natural Heritage Inventories that locate and identify rare species and special habitats in all 67 Pennsylvania Counties.