Ohio/EZFeed Policies

Jump to: navigation, search

EZ Feed Policies for Ohio

Download EZFeed Policies for Ohio CSV (rows 1 - 45)

Policy Place Policy Type Active Affected Technologies Implementing Sector Summary
Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations
Fees
Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10 tons per year, or any combination of hazardous air pollutants greater than 25 tons per year, must submit, in a form and manner prescribed by the director, a fee emission report that quantifies the actual emission data for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, and lead. The owner or operator of a facility shall pay fees on the facility's actual emissions. The fee for reporting year 2011 is $45.55/ton.
Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) Ohio Green Power Purchasing
Siting and Permitting
Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Geothermal Electric
Hydroelectric energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Ohio's Alternative Energy Zones are made possible through Ohio's Senate Bill 232, which reduced taxes on alternative energy projects. The Alternative Energy Zones are designated on a county-by-county basis, and provide developers with incentive for projects located in these counties. Incentives include a quicker approval process and set rates for revenue.
Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Ohio Siting and Permitting Yes Wind energy Utility Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility.

An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public.

The applicant shall conduct a project area site selection study prior to submitting an application for a wind-powered electric generation facility. The study shall be designed to evaluate all practicable project area sites for the proposed facility. Information on the location, major features, and the topographic, geologic, and hydrologic suitability of the proposed project area site and any proposed alternative project area site(s) shall be submitted by the applicant.

For detailed requirements for the project summary and siting study, please see: http://www.puc.state.oh.us/emplibrary/files/legal/rules/chapters/4906-17.doc
Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) Ohio Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Fuel Cells
Hydroelectric energy
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Solar Photovoltaics
Utility An applicant for a certificate to site a major electric power, gas, or natural gas transmission facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public. The applicant shall provide a statement explaining the need for the proposed facility, including a listing of the factors upon which it relied to reach that conclusion and references to the most recent long-term forecast report (if applicable).
Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Ohio Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Hydroelectric energy
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Utility An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public.

The applicant shall state the current and proposed ownership status of the proposed facility, including site(s), rights-of-way, structures, and equipment. Such information shall include type of ownership.

The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. Where appropriate, the applicant may substitute all or portions of documents filed to meet federal, state, or local regulations. Existing data may be substituted for physical measurements.
Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

Included in the chapter are rules governing emissions from biomass treatment facilities, natural gas, and any facility that emits steam or particulates into the air.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Division of Air Pollution Control has more information on regulatory programs, air monitoring, and permitting.
Climate Action Plan (Ohio) Ohio Climate Policies No Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The State of Ohio does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Emergency Episode Standards (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter of the law authorizing the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives a detailed description of the excessive buildup of air contaminants during air pollution episodes that leads to an emergency.

The law sets the standards for limits on different types of air pollution, the criteria for an emergency situation, and the foundation for emergency action programs.

For more information, visit the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Division of Air Pollution Control.
Forestry Policies (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province Ohio's Forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resource, Division of Forestry. In 2010 Ohio issued its Statewide Forest Resource Assessment, including discussion of forest resources with respect to bioenergy in the state:

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/portals/forestry/pdfs/FAP/Assessment.pdf

In 2004 Ohio State University issued an inventory of biomass resources, "Assessing Ohio's Biomass Resources for Energy Potential Using GIS" including estimation of available forest residues: http://www.puc.state.oh.us/emplibrary/files/media/biomass/bioenergyresourceassessment.pdf

The Ohio Biomass Energy Program has issued the report "Utilization of Biomass Energy Resources in Ohio: A Linear Programming Model", which identifies potential sites for biomass power plants based on availability of forest and industrial wood residues:

http://www.puco.ohio.gov/puco/index.cfm/industry-information/industry-topics/ohio-biomass-summary-of-utilization-a-linear-programming-model/
General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the air pollution rules to secure and maintain levels of air quality that are consistent with the protection of health and the prevention of injury to plant, animal life, and property in the state of Ohio, and to provide for the comfortable enjoyment of the natural attractions of the state to the greatest extent practical. For more information, see the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Division of Air Pollution Control.
Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state) Illinois
Indiana
Minnesota
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Ontario
Quebec
Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Energy Storage
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council, which is responsible for water conservation and efficiency programs and reviewing proposed projects. Projects which may lead to new or increased water diversions are limited; exceptions are described in this statute. More information can be found on the website of the Council: http://www.glslcompactcouncil.org/
Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the treatment of hazardous waste from landfills for the recovery of energy, including exempting such facilities from treatment fees. For more information, see the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Division of Materials and Waste Management.
Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do generate electricity or biogas.
Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Ohio Industry Recruitment/Support
Grant Program
Loan Program
No Concentrating Solar Power
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and technologies. The Office of Energy is currently working on developing the supply chains for the wind, solar, nuclear and natural gas industries. Strategic support has been provided to GLWN and Energy Industries of Ohio and has resulted in hundreds of Ohio businesses receiving assistance to strengthen their core competencies to be matched with global OEMs.
Innovation Ohio Loan Program (Ohio) Ohio Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Innovation Ohio Loan Program provides loans for acquisition, construction, and related costs of technology, facilities, and equipment purchase. The Ohio Department of Development’s (Development) IOF Loan is targeted at companies having difficulty securing funds from conventional sources due to technical and commercial risk factors associated with the development of a new product or service. The IOF Loan may finance up to 75% of allowable project costs with loans ranging in size from $500,000 to $1,500,000 and a term period of 4 to 7 years.

The Innovation Ohio Loan Fund targets industry sectors involving the production or use of: • Advanced Materials; • Instruments, Controls and Electronics; • Power and Propulsion; • Biosciences; and

• Information Technology.
Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) Alabama
Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Missouri
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact is administered by the Interstate Mining Compact Commission, which does not possess regulatory powers but “provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states” and thus aids the development of effective regulatory programs and environmental protection initiatives. The Commission exercises several powers on behalf of the states, all of which are of a study, recommendatory or consultative nature. The Commission does not possess regulatory powers, as some Compacts do. The Commission provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states. It is the potential to stimulate the development and production of each state's mineral wealth through effective regulatory programs that draws many of the states together in the prosecution of the Commission's work. Given the environmental sensitivities associated with this objective, a significant portion of the Commission's work is dedicated to the environmental protection issues naturally associated with this mineral development. It is the significant value and clout that comes from "compacting" together and speaking with a strong, united voice that can make a difference in each state's efforts to implement effective regulatory programs that will conserve natural resources and secure a vibrant state (and thus national) mineral economy.
Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas
Utah
Virginia
West Virginia
Wyoming
Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health, safety and the environment.

The Commission serves as the collective voice of member governors on oil and gas issues and advocates states' rights to govern petroleum resources within their borders.

The Commission formed the Geological CO2 Sequestration Task Force, which examines the technical, policy and regulatory issues related to safe and effective storage of CO2 in the subsurface (depleted oil and natural gas fields, saline formations and coal beds).

The Commission also funds research on hydraulic fracking, reusing water used in extracting oil and gas, and makes recommendations on national energy policies and statutes for individual states.

The Commission also has several associate states: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. In addition, it has international affiliations with the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon.
Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States) Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Ohio
Wisconsin
Environmental Regulations Yes Nuclear State/Province The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe disposal of commercial low-level radioactive waste. The Compact was enacted into law by each member state legislature during the period from 1982 through 1984, and received Congressional consent in 1985. The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact Commission is the administrative body of the Compact. It consists of one voting Commissioner from each of the six member states. Each state determines how it will appoint its Commissioner, and the state’s Governor must provide written notification to the Commission of the appointment of a Commissioner and any Alternate Commissioners.
Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States) Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Montana
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin
Manitoba
Green Power Purchasing Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit The Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS®) tracks renewable energy generation in participating States and Provinces and assists in verifying compliance with individual state/provincial or voluntary Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) and objectives. M-RETS® is a tool to keep track of all relevant information about renewable energy produced and delivered in the region. Currently, several States and Provinces participate in M-RETS®: Illinois, Iowa, Manitoba, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin have policies in place requiring or strongly encouraging utility development of renewable resources. M-RETS® uses verifiable production data for all participating generators and creates a Renewable Energy Credit (REC) in the form of a tradable digital certificate for each MWh.
Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes Natural Gas State/Province Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901:1-13 of the Ohio Administrative Code. The standards set connection requirements, safety standards, billing standards, service requirements, and other general standards.
Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx or VOC is emitted from a facility at or above the reporting threshold, both pollutants must be included in the emissions statement even if one of the pollutants is emitted at a level below the reporting threshold.

The emission statements must include at a minimum the following information: (1) The certifying individual shall certify that the information contained in the statement is accurate to the best of their knowledge and that all estimates and judgments relating to such information have been made in good faith. (2) Estimated actual emissions of NOx and VOC, in tons per year. (3) Any other supporting information.

Exemptions: R&D sources at a facility where the combined potential to emit for all of the R&D sources is less than five tons per year for NOx and less than five tons per year for VOC or where the owner or operator maintains records which demonstrate that the combined actual emissions for all of the R&D sources does not exceed five tons per year for NOx and five tons per year for VOC, are not required to complete the emission statement.
Ohio Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) Ohio Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Geothermal Electric
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority provides financing for new air quality facilities for all types of Ohio businesses, ranging from small, family-owned shops to multi-million-dollar manufacturing plants. Many large Ohio companies, in fact, are required to purchase new equipment or make operational changes to comply with EPA air quality regulations. Smaller companies of 100 or fewer employees may also need to make similar changes. The Clean Air Resource Center is the small-business program of OAQDA, providing free, confidential consultation and financing. Qualifying projects include any project involving the use of renewable or biomass resources, including ethanol and other biofuel production plants.
Ohio Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) Ohio Industry Recruitment/Support
Workforce development
Grant Program
Training/Technical Assistance
Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province Ohio is one of seven states participating in the Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program which was established in 1983. The Regional Program is administered by the Council of Great Lakes Governors and receives funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The other six states under the Great Lakes Biomass Energy Program are: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

The Regional Program's State Grant Program provides annual funding to seven states to support state biomass energy programs. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) matches the Regional Program funds to operate the Ohio Biomass Energy Program and provides staffing to administer the program.

The mission of the Ohio Biomass Energy Program (OBEP) is to increase the development and utilization of biomass energy resources in Ohio in order to promote energy sustainability and a cleaner environment. The environmental benefits of renewable biomass resources include reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, air pollutants, and landfill wastes, as well as efficient use of municipal, industrial, and farm wastes. Development of biomass energy resources may stimulate the economic growth in rural areas and provide "green power" options in the competitive electric industry.

The Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program ended in 2009. However, the state program is still in service. The program monitors PUCO regulations for biomass and provides assistance and funding to biomass projects.
Ohio Coal Research and Development Program (Ohio) Ohio Grant Program Yes Coal with CCS State/Province The Ohio Coal Development Office invests in the development and implementation of technologies that can use Ohio's vast reserves of coal in an economical, environmentally sound manner. Projects are identified through public solicitations and may include technologies that improve combustion efficiencies, remove various pollutants from emissions, develop productive uses for the by-products of combustion, and investigate new uses for coal as a feedstock. The aggregate principal amount of money borrowed, bonds and other obligations issued by the state for this program is not to exceed $100 million. Eligible applicants include: municipal, rural, investor-owned utilities, nonprofit, and for-profit entities doing business in Ohio or an education or scientific institution located in Ohio.

Ohio Coal Research Consortium – Provides grants to research institutions studying mechanisms critical to emissions formation and methods of control, or for uses of coal as a feedstock for other processes. This includes fundamental research, development and inquiry that enable the conversion or use of Ohio coal as a fuel or chemical feedstock in an environmentally acceptable manner.

Ohio Coal Demonstration and Pilot – Issues grants involving utility power producers, clean coal technology developers, research and development firms and universities directed toward the discovery of new technologies or the demonstration or application of existing technologies that enables the conversion or use of Ohio coal as a fuel or chemical feedstock in an environmentally acceptable manner. Up to three demonstration installations utilizing a specific technology are allowable.
Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States) Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia
Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas
Coal with CCS
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission representing eight states and the federal government. ORSANCO operates programs to improve water quality in the Ohio River and its tributaries, including: setting waste water discharge standards; performing biological assessments; monitoring for the chemical and physical properties of the waterways; and conducting special surveys and studies. ORSANCO also coordinates emergency response activities for spills or accidental discharges to the river, and promotes public participation in programs, such as the Ohio River Sweep and the RiverWatchers Volunteer Monitoring Program. ORSANCO sets Pollution Control Standards for industrial and municipal waste water discharges to the Ohio River, and tracks certain dischargers whose effluent can seriously impact water quality. The standards designate specific uses for the Ohio, and establish guidelines to ensure that the river is capable of supporting these uses. To keep pace with current issues, ORSANCO reviews the standards every three years. As part of the review process, workshops and public hearings are held for public input.
PJM Interconnection (Multiple States) Delaware
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Maryland
Michigan
New Jersey
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia
District of Columbia
Interconnection Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit PJM (originally Pennsylvania, Jersey, Maryland) Interconnection is a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity in all or parts of Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. The PJM region has an area of 214,000 square miles, a population of about 60 million and a peak demand of 163,848 megawatts.
Particulate Matter Standards (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency sets the standards for particulate emissions from a variety of sources, including facilities that generate power. Specific passages refer to existing and potential future electricity generating facilities and utilities.
Permit Program Regulating Discharge of Nondomestic Wastewater into a POTW (Ohio) Ohio Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province Any significant industrial user is required to apply for and obtain an individual indirect discharge permit if they discharge water or waste into a publicly owned treatment works.
Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This law lists state requirements and standards regulating the introduction of pollutants into Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) by industrial users. The following substances shall not be introduced into a POTW:

(1) Pollutants that create a fire or explosion hazard in the POTW including, but not limited to, wastestreams with a closed cup flashpoint of less than 140 degrees Fahrenheit or 60 degrees;

(2) Pollutants that will cause corrosive structural damage to the POTW, but in no case discharges with pH lower than 5.0, unless the POTW is specifically designed to accommodate such discharges;

(3) Solid or viscous pollutants in amounts that will cause obstruction to the flow in sewers, or other interference with the operation of the POTW;

(4) Any pollutant, including oxygen demanding pollutants, released in a discharge at a flow rate or pollutant concentration as to cause interference with the POTW;

(5) Heat in amounts that will inhibit biological activity in the POTW treatment plant resulting in interference or causing damage, but in no case heat in such quantities that the temperature exceeds 104 degrees Fahrenheit at the POTW treatment plant;

(6) Petroleum oil, nonbiodegradable cutting oil, or products of mineral oil origin in amounts that will cause interference or pass through;

(7) Pollutants that result in the presence of toxic gases, vapors, or fumes within the POTW in a quantity that may cause acute worker health and safety problems; or

(8) Any trucked or hauled pollutants, except at discharge points designated by the POTW.

All industrial users shall notify the POTW immediately of all discharges that could cause problems to the POTW, including any slug loading.
Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio) Ohio Bond Program Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Geothermal Electric
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) administers the Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECB) program in Ohio. QECBs have been used by local governments and public universities to finance the installation of energy conserving equipment in publicly owned buildings. Under a QECB financing package, OAQDA authorizes Air Quality Development Bonds for issuance as a Series A federally tax-exempt bond and a Series B Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) federal tax-credit bond. Combining funding from the two separate sources results in a lower, "blended" interest rate for the participating entity.

Qualified conservation purposes include:

Capital expenditures that will reduce energy consumption in publicly owned buildings by at least 20%, fund green community programs, or support rural development involving the production of electricity from renewable sources;

Research expenditures that support the development of cellulosic ethanol or other non-fossil fuels, technologies for the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide, increasing the efficiency of existing technologies for producing non-fossil fuels, automobile battery technologies to reduce fossil fuel consumption in transportation or technologies to reduce energy use in buildings;

Mass commuting facilities;

Demonstration projects that promote commercialization of green building technology, conversion of agricultural waste, advanced battery manufacturing technologies, technologies to reduce peak electricity consumption or technologies for the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuels that produce electricity; and

Public education campaigns to promote energy efficiency.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Ohio) Ohio Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Ohio as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (Indiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Virginia) may be lower.
Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio) Ohio Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Development Services Agency's (ODSA) Regional 166 Direct Loan provides low-interest loans to businesses creating new jobs or preserving existing employment opportunities in the State of Ohio.

Eligible projects include those related to industry, commerce, distribution or research activities. Retail projects are ineligible for the Regional 166 Direct Loan.

Allowable Project Costs/Uses: -Land and/or building purchase; if the project involves the purchase of an existing building, the business must occupy at least 51% of the premises Machinery and equipment purchase -Building construction and/or renovation costs; if the project involves new construction the business must occupy at least 60% of the premises -Long-term leasehold improvements -Ongoing businesses fixed asset purchase -Capitalizable costs directly related to a fixed-asset purchase -Refinancing is ineligible

Available Funding: The Regional 166 Direct Loan may finance up to 40% of allowable project costs with loans up to $350,000. The Regional 166 Direct Loans are "take-out" financing (allowable project costs/uses must be purchased with interim financing with the Regional 166 Direct Loan disbursing upon project completion). Businesses requesting more than $500,000 may participate in the 166 Direct Loan Program.
Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements.

Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting such facilities in floodways, and is not located in a national or state park, or recreation area. Other specific setbacks are as follows:

250 feet from surface water

250 feet from areas designated by the Department of Natural Resources as either a national wildlife refuge or a national scenic river

250 feet from a domicile

250 feet from areas designated by the United States Forest Service as either a special interest area or a research natural area in the Wayne national forest

250 feet from surface waters of the state designated by Ohio EPA as either a state resource water, a coldwater habitat, or an exceptional warmwater habitat.

The Ohio EPA's Division of Materials and Waste Management runs a Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities program to administer the law.
Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides regulations for stacks for industrial facilities. “Stack” means any chimney, flue, conduit or duct arranged to conduct any emissions to the ambient air, excluding flares. “Stack height” means the distance from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack to the crown of the stack. If a stack arises from a building or other structure, the ground-level elevation of that building or structure will be used as the base elevation of the stack. For stacks in existence on January 12, 1979, the stack height calculated by the following formula: Hg= 2.5 H, where Hg = good engineering practice stack height, measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack; and H = height of nearby structure(s) measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack. For all other stacks, the stack height calculated by the following formula: Hg= H + 1.5 L, where L = height or projected width, whichever is less, of nearby structure(s).
Sulphur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and equipment for industries that have sulfur dioxide emissions. The Ohio EPA's Division of Air Pollution Control has monitoring and compliance programs authorized under this law.
Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province This law establishes criteria for three levels of credible data for a surface water quality monitoring and assessment program and establishes the necessary training and experience for persons to submit credible data, thereby increasing the information base upon which to enhance, improve and maintain water resource quality in Ohio.  Details about each level can be found on the Ohio EPA's website for the Division of Surface Water.
The 166 Direct Loan (Ohio) Ohio Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The 166 Direct Loan provides loans for land and building acquisition, expansion or renovation, and equipment purchase. This program may finance up to 50% of allowable project costs with loans ranging in size from $500,000 to $1,500,000. Development requires the creation or retention, within a three-year period, of one job for each $35,000 of 166 Direct Loan proceeds.
The Job Creation Tax Credit Program (Ohio) Ohio Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Job Creation Tax Credit Servicing site provides assistance to businesses that have previously been approved for a tax credit by the Ohio Tax Credit Authority (Authority).

Projects approved by the Authority are then required to enter into a tax credit agreement, summarizing the commitments and compliance requirements pursuant to the Ohio Revised Code.

The tax credit is based on the state income tax withheld by the taxpayer for new jobs created as a result of new business investment in Ohio. The Authority is charged with reviewing and approving applications and setting the tax credit rate and term. The Authority may grant tax credits under the program allowing companies to receive refundable credits generally up to 75 percent of withheld state income taxes, for a period of up to 15 years.

The tax credit rate and term are determined by the Authority based on the number of jobs to be created, the new payroll to be generated by the project, the fixed asset investment in the project, and the extent of interstate competition for the project.
The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) (Ohio) Ohio Loan Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) encourages state depository financial institutions to make loans to for-profit or nonprofit small businesses that are having difficulty obtaining business loans through conventional underwriting standards. The business’ principal place of business must be in Ohio with revenues less than $10 million and with fewer than 250 employees. The OCAP encourages lending by establishing a unique loan "guarantee" reserve pool at an OCAP participating lending institution. The state, the lender, and the borrower each pay a small fee contribution into the pool. With every loan each participating lending institution enrolls in the OCAP, the reserve pool at that institution grows. The reserve pool is available to the participating Lender for recovery of any losses on any loan they have enrolled in the OCAP. The maximum loan amount for working capital is $250,000, and $350,000 for fixed assets.
The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area (Ohio) Ohio Property Tax Incentive Yes Solar Photovoltaics State/Province The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county government that provides real property tax exemptions for property owners who renovate existing or construct new buildings. The program is delineated into two distinct categories, those created prior to July 1994 ("pre-1994") and those created after.
The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (Ohio) Ohio Bond Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (OEBF) was created in 1988 to promote economic development, create and retain quality jobs and assist governmental operations. The program enables non-profit and for-profit borrowers to access the national capital markets through bonds issued through OEBF. The program is administered by the Ohio Department of Development and financing is provided by the Ohio Treasurer of State. The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund may provide financing up to 90 percent of the total eligible project costs that are directly related to the fixed-asset purchase. The minimum borrowing amount is $1.5 million and the maximum amount is $10 million.
The Ohio Enterprise Zone program (Ohio) Ohio Property Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Enterprise Zone program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county governments that provides real and personal property tax exemptions to businesses making investments in Ohio. In order to use the Enterprise Zone program, communities petition to the Ohio Department of Development for certification of a geographical zone with a contiguous boundary. Once a zone is certified, communities may enter into negotiated agreements with businesses that invest in the zone.

Enterprise zones are designated areas of land in which businesses can receive tax incentives in the form of tax exemptions on eligible new investment. The zone's geographic area is identified by the local communities involved in the creation of the zone. The boundary should (1) include areas appropriate for business development, (2) have a single continuous boundary, (3) meet minimum population requirements, and (4) evidence the distress characteristics, when applicable. Once a zone is defined, the local legislative authority participating in the creation must petition the director of the Development Services Agency. The director must then certify the area for it to become an active Enterprise Zone.

Local communities may offer tax incentives for non-retail projects that are establishing or expanding operations in the State of Ohio. Real property investments are eligible for tax incentives, as well as personal property investments for those entities that continue to pay personal property tax. Tax incentives are negotiated at the local level, and an enterprise zone agreement must be in place before the project begins. Businesses interested in pursuing these incentives should contact the local Enterprise Zone Manager.
The Ohio Workforce Guarantee (Ohio) Ohio Training/Technical Assistance
Workforce development
No Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Ohio Workforce Guarantee Grant servicing function of the Ohio Development Services Agency provides assistance to businesses that have been previously awarded a grant by the State of Ohio. These services include: drafting grant agreements and any subsequent amendments, processing grant payment requests, reviewing annual reports, and providing technical support to existing grantees.
Water Quality Standards (Ohio) Ohio Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the minimum water quality requirements for all surface waters of the state.

Water quality standards contain two distinct elements: designated uses; and numerical or narrative criteria designed to protect and measure attainment of the uses.

Each water body in the state is assigned one or more aquatic life habitat use designations. Each water body may be assigned one or more water supply use designations and/or one recreational use designation.

Statewide chemical-specific criteria for the support of use designations are presented in this rule.

Each water resource area has its own specific section, detailing minimum standards and requirements for those areas. Wetlands are also covered under this rule.
Water Quality Trading Program (Ohio) Ohio Corporate Tax Incentive
Environmental Regulations
Yes Coal with CCS
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wave Energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province Water quality trading is a tool for achieving water quality improvements. Under the right circumstances, trading has the potential to yield both environmental and economic benefits, while promoting increased interaction among watershed stakeholders.

The water quality trading program is a voluntary program that allows a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit holder (point source) to meet its regulatory obligations by using pollutant reductions generated by another wastewater point source or non-point source.

The program provides economic incentives for voluntary pollutant reductions from point sources and nonpoint sources.
Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin) Wisconsin Siting and Permitting Yes Nuclear Local Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water use permits exist: a general permit is required for withdrawals that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period but do not equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. An individual permit is required for withdrawals that equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. There are no permit application fees.