Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes

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Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes

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Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes:
A kind of hot spring or fumarole with limited water causing a bubbling pool with a consistency of mud or clay.
Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle


Modern Geothermal Features

Typical list of modern geothermal features
Mudpot in Yellowstone National Park(reference: nps.gov)


Mudpots and mud pools are actually hot springs or fumaroles with limited amounts of water but a lot of clay from surrounding rock and soil causing a boiling slurry. Not to be confused with mud volcanoes, which are the results of diapirs of mud rising from below the Earth’s surface.

Examples

Want to add an example to this list? Select a Geothermal Resource Area to edit its "Modern Geothermal Feature" property using the "Edit with Form" button.

CSV
Geothermal
Resource
Area
Geothermal
Region
Control
Structure
Host
Rock
Age
Host
Rock
Lithology
Mean
Capacity
Mean
Reservoir
Temp
Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Accommodation Zone Mesozoic metamorphic rocks 26.1 MW26,100 kW
26,100,000 W
26,100,000,000 mW
0.0261 GW
2.61e-5 TW
455.15 K182 °C
359.6 °F
819.27 °R
Java - Kamojang Geothermal Area Sunda Volcanic Arc Major Normal Fault 200 MW200,000 kW
200,000,000 W
200,000,000,000 mW
0.2 GW
2.0e-4 TW
518.15 K245 °C
473 °F
932.67 °R
Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Quaternary Bishop Tuff, Metamorphic Basement 38 MW38,000 kW
38,000,000 W
38,000,000,000 mW
0.038 GW
3.8e-5 TW
513.15 K240 °C
464 °F
923.67 °R
Los Azufres Geothermal Area Transmexican Volcanic Belt Miocene-Pliocene Andesite 188 MW188,000 kW
188,000,000 W
188,000,000,000 mW
0.188 GW
1.88e-4 TW
448.15 K175 °C
347 °F
806.67 °R
Pailas Geothermal Area Central American Volcanic Arc Chain Andesite 35 MW35,000 kW
35,000,000 W
35,000,000,000 mW
0.035 GW
3.5e-5 TW
Salton Sea Geothermal Area Gulf of California Rift Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Pleistocene sandstone 437 MW437,000 kW
437,000,000 W
437,000,000,000 mW
0.437 GW
4.37e-4 TW
575.15 K302 °C
575.6 °F
1,035.27 °R
San Jacinto Geothermal Area Central American Volcanic Arc Chain 87 MW87,000 kW
87,000,000 W
87,000,000,000 mW
0.087 GW
8.7e-5 TW
543.15 K270 °C
518 °F
977.67 °R
Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Fault Intersection
Stratigraphic Boundaries
Caldera Rim Margins
Precambrian; Mississippian-Pennsylvanian; Pleistocene, 1.6 to 1.25 Ma; Pliocene; Miocene Crystalline basement “pCu”; Limestone-Madera Formation “MIPu”; Rhyolitic tuff-Bandelier Tuff (upper Tshirege “Qbt” and lower Otowi “Qbo” members); Caldera Fill Rhyolite (shallow); Dacitic/Andesitic to Rhyolitic lavas and tuffs-Keres Group Volcanics (shallow); Santa Fe Group volcaniclastics “Tsf”

References