Missouri/EZ Policies

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EZ Policies for Missouri

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Policy Place Policy Type Active Implementing Sector Summary
Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Missouri Department of Agriculture offers direct loans through the Agriculture Development Fund to finance the production, processing and marketing needs of an alternative agricultural enterprise. An agricultural alternative project is doing something different from what traditional rural operations are currently doing.

Criteria: - Applicant must be a legal Missouri resident and the project must be located in Missouri - Applicant must be a minimum of 14 years of age - Maximum loan - $20,000 - Interest Rate - 5.9%

- Maximum term of loan - 5 years with semi-annual payments
Ameren Missouri - Photovoltaic Rebate Program (Missouri) Missouri Utility Rebate Program No Utility Ameren Missouri offers rebates to its customers for the installation of net metered photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The rebate is set at $2.00 per DC watt with a maximum rebate of $50,000. Systems of 100 kW or less (the maximum size allowed under Missouri's net metering rules) qualify for rebates on the first 25 kW of installed capacity. Only systems that become operational after December 31, 2009 are eligible for the rebate. Beginning in July 2014, the incentive rates will decline until they are phased out in July 2020.

In order to qualify for incentives, a customer must have an electric account in good standing with the utility. Eligible systems must use new equipment; be permanently installed on the customer's property; and have module and inverter manufacturer's warranties of at least 10 years. Installations must comply with all applicable federal, state and local codes and standards, including the state of Missouri's Interconnection Standards. Rebate recipients must certify that the system will remain in operation on their property for its useful life (deemed to be a minimum of 10 years). Notably, the customer retains ownership of all solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) generated by the system.

This program arises from 2008 Proposition C, a ballot initiative that established a state renewable portfolio standard in Missouri and required the state's investor-owned utilities to offer solar rebates of at least $2.00 per watt beginning in 2010.
Ameren Missouri - Solar Renewable Energy Credits Missouri Performance-Based Incentive Yes Utility Ameren Missouri offers a Standard Offer Contract to customers that generate solar power. The customer must meet Ameren's net metering requirements and submit an application for net metering. The 2013 SREC tariff is $5 per SREC, which is down significantly from the 2012 rate of $50 per SREC.

For systems of less than 10 kW, Ameren will pay an up-front, lump sum payment for the estimated number of Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs) that will be produced for 10 years. The estimated 10-year production will be calculated by Ameren using PVWatts software.

For systems of 10 kW to 100 kW, Ameren offers a 10-year contract for the SRECs, and will make annual payments to the customer based on the number of SRECs produced in the previous year.
Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan proceeds may be used to finance 100% of the cost of an eligible animal waste treatment system.
Brownfield Redevelopment Program (Missouri) Missouri Personal Tax Incentives Yes State/Province Brownfield Redevelopment Program provides financial incentives for the redevelopment of commercial/industrial sites that are contaminated with hazardous substances and have been abandoned or underutilized for at least three years. The Department of Economic Development(DED)may issue tax credits for up to 100% of the cost of remediating the project property. DED will issue 75% of the credits upon adequate proof of payment of the costs; the remaining 25% will not be issued until a clean letter has been issued by DNR. The tax credit may also include up to one hundred percent of the costs of demolition that are not directly part of the remediation activities. State tax credits may also be issued for non-remediation demolition costs. The total state costs for providing tax credits must be less than the projected economic impact, as determined by the DED.
Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) Missouri Equity Investment No State/Province Certified Capital Companies (CAPCO), the creation of the Department of Economic Development (DED,) are venture capital firms which have certain requirements to make equity investments in eligible businesses in Missouri. To qualify for CAPCO funding, businesses must be independently owned, headquartered in Missouri and employ less than 200 persons before the investment is made. The annual revenue of the business in its last fiscal year must be less than $4 million, or, if the business is more than 3 years old, the revenue limit is $3 million. Service companies must also demonstrate that more than 33% of its revenue would be from outside the state of Missouri. At this point, all credits allowed under the law have been authorized.
Climate Action Plan (Missouri) Missouri Climate Policies No State/Province Currently, the State of Missouri does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress. Several municipalities and universities have climate action plans in place.
Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard (Missouri) Missouri Renewables Portfolio Standard Yes Local In November 2004, voters in Columbia, Missouri approved a proposal to adopt a local renewables portfolio standard (RPS).* The initiative requires the city's municipal utility, Columbia Water and Light, to generate or purchase electricity generated from eligible renewable-energy resources at the following levels:
  • 2% by December 31, 2007
  • 5% by December 31, 2012
  • 10% by December 31, 2017
  • 15% by December 31, 2022

Eligible renewable-energy resources outlined in the ordinance include solar energy (both electricity and heat), wind electricity, hydroelectricity, geothermal energy, and biomass sources, including landfill gas, paper based products, such as cardboard and newsprint, wood and wood wastes, cellulose based products that originate from trees or shrubbery; and other materials that come directly from trees or plants. Passive solar and geothermal heat pump energy systems are ineligible.

Columbia has also established a goal of meeting 1% of its RPS target using solar energy and is developing a new program, termed Solar One, to assist in achieving this goal. The Solar One program allows utility customers to voluntarily purchase 100 kilowatt-hour (kWh) blocks of solar energy for a small additional charge on their electricity bill. Solar power is generated by local facilities on city-owned properties and local businesses, currently totaling 10 kilowatts (kW). An additional 15 kW of solar capacity is expected to be added by Fall 2010, allowing the utility to enroll additional customers in the program.

Resources must meet the environmental criteria approved by the Columbia City Council, after review by the Columbia Environment and Energy Commission and the Columbia Water and Light Advisory Board. Electricity purchased from on-site renewable energy systems owned by Columbia Water and Light customers may be included to meet the standard. Resources must be close enough to Columbia that the power can be physically transmitted into the Water and Light system. In the future, however, the higher compliance requirements may force the utility to look at green tags (i.e. renewable energy credits) as an option. The Water and Light Department intends to pursue this avenue only as a last resort.

The standard will be met to the extent possible without increasing electric rates by more than 3% as a result of the standard. According to the 2013 Report shows the city reached 7.94% in 2012. The utility's current energy portfolio is largely based on wind and landfill gas resources, with a small amount from biomass/coal co-firing and solar.

By February 1 of each year, the Columbia Water and Light Department must issue a renewable-energy plan, detailing a proposal for how the city intends to comply with the RPS ordinance during the following year. The plan explains the city's due diligence in pursuing renewable-energy opportunities and detail all cost assumptions and related utility rate calculations, except with regard to confidential information that may be withheld pursuant to state law. It is then be reviewed by the Columbia Environment and Energy Commission and the Columbia Water and Light Advisory Board, and submitted to the Columbia City Council for approval following a public hearing.


* The RPS was approved by 78% of voters, with no organized opposition. The state renewable electricity standard adopted by ballot initiative in November 2008 does not apply to municipal utilities such as Columbia Water and Light.
Columbia Water & Light - Solar Rebates (Missouri) Missouri Utility Rebate Program Yes Utility Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and residential customers for the purchase of solar water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems. These rebates are available for solar water heaters that were installed after April 2007, and for solar photovoltaic systems that were installed after June 2007. Following installation of any of these efficiency measures, applicable building or plumbing permits should be secured.

Columbia Water & Light electric customers are eligible for a $400 rebate for the purchase of a new solar water heater. To apply for this rebate, a customer submits a pre-approval application to Columbia Water & Light prior to installation and commits to maintaining the system for at least five years. The application can be found on the program website listed above. Customers with an existing natural gas water heater are eligible for an $800 rebate if they convert to a solar electric water heating system.

Customers are eligible for a $500 rebate for each kilowatt (kW) of solar photovoltaic installed. Pre-project approval is required in order for a system to be eligible for a rebate. Systems must be between 0.25 kW and 10 kW in size and must meet a variety of interconnection, net metering, and rebate requirements. All attributes associated with the production of energy from the system accrue to the CWL under the utility's net metering agreement. Federal tax credits are applicable on top of these incentives.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
County Planning, Zoning, and Recreation on Natural Streams and Waterways (Missouri) Missouri Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province This legislation contains provisions pertaining to local planning and zoning issues, particularly regarding sites adjacent to natural streams and waterways. Certain counties are authorized to form county planning commissions, which direct and oversee planning and zoning decisions. Plans for developments or public improvements are subject to approval by county planning commissions, and commissions may also regulate the types of structures permissible on land in their jurisdiction. This legislation also addresses land acquisition for landfill purposes in certain counties. No additional restrictions are placed by this legislation on open-cut or strip mining; commercial structures are permitted in all districts except those zoned for residential or recreational use.
Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Missouri Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a dam across any watercourse, provided that: (a) the entity is chartered to construct, operate and maintain mills, electric power and light works, or other machinery; (b) the watercourse is not a navigable stream; and (c) the entity is the proprietor of the land on which the dam is to be erected or is the owner of the land on one side of the stream where the dam is to be erected. This legislation contains additional procedures which must be followed to lawfully erect a dam.
Eligible Facility Borrower (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Missouri State Treasurer’s Office administers the Missouri Linked Deposit Program, one of the nation’s most utilized low interest loan programs. In order to promote Missouri’s economic growth and development, below-market rate deposits of state funds are placed in Missouri financial institutions, allowing eligible borrowers to obtain low interest loans from that institution. The borrower typically saves 25-30% of the interest paid on a standard business loan. An Eligible Facility Borrower is a development facility or renewable fuel production facility borrower; otherwise defined as any partnership, corporation, cooperative, or limited liability company organized or incorporated under the laws of this state consisting of not less than twelve producer members for the purpose of owning or operating within this state a development facility or a renewable fuel production facility. The production facility borrower must be qualified by the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority. The energy must derived from a renewable, domestically grown organic compound capable of powering machinery, including an engine or power plant, and any by-product derived from such energy source.
Energy Loan Program (Missouri) Missouri State Loan Program Yes State/Territory Note: The Division of Energy is now accepting applications for the FY2015 program. Applications are due October 31, 2014.


The Missouri Energy Loan Program, administered by the Division of Energy in the Missouri Department of Economic Development (DED), is available for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects for public and governmental buildings and structures. Eligible recipients include public schools (K-12), public/private colleges and universities, city/county governments, public water and wastewater treatment facilities, and public/private non-profit hospitals.

Loan amounts are based on projected energy savings from energy efficiency upgrades, which result in monetary savings that are used to repay the loan. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 (July 2014 – October 2014), financing is set at a 2.5% interest rate and 1% loan origination fee. Repayment schedules are determined on an individual project basis, but not to exceed 10 years. Loans under this program are determined on a competitive basis according to payback period.


In FY2014, $5,000,000 in loan funding was available, and in FY2015, $7,500,000 in loan funding is available. Loans are available in amounts from $5,000 to $1,500,000 per applicant. As funds remain after review and priority ranking of applications, the department has considered awarding loans in excess of $1,500,000.


Background


The Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Division of Energy has provided the energy loans from petroleum violation escrow funds and bonds since 1989. Since the program's inception, loans totaling over $89 million have been made through this program, resulting in an estimated cumulative savings of $167 million. The interest rates for energy loan financing are generally lower than the market interest rates. Loan recipients repay the loans with money saved on energy costs as a result of implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. An energy saving loan is not defined as debt for public schools and local governments and therefore does not count against debt limits or require a public vote or bond issuance.
Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) Missouri Corporate Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
Yes State/Province Enhanced Enterprise Zones aim at attracting new businesses or promoting an expansion of existing business in Missouri Enhanced Enterprise Zone. Tax credits will be an amount authorized by DED, based on the state economic benefit, supported by the number of new jobs, wages and new capital investment that the project will create. To qualify, individual business eligibility will be determined by the zone, based on creation of sustainable jobs in a targeted industry or demonstrated impact on local industry cluster development. Service industries can be eligible if a majority of their annual revenues will be derived from services provided out of the state.

Eligibility: To receive tax credits for any of the years, the facility must create and maintain the minimum: - New or expanded business facility – 2 new employees and $100,000 new investment; - Replacement business facility – 2 new employees and $1,000,000 new investment - Company must offer health insurance at all times, of which at least 50% is paid by the employer, to all full time employees in Missouri.

Eligible investment expenditures include the original cost of machinery, equipment, furniture, fixtures, land and building, and/or eight times the annual rental rate paid for the same. Inventory is not eligible.

Tax credits issued under this program are limited to $24,000,000 annually, effective August 28, 2008.
Environmental Improvement and Energy Resources Authority (Missouri) Missouri Bond Program
Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes State/Province The Environmental Improvement and Energy Resources Authority  (EIERA) is a quasi-governmental agency that serves as the financing arm for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. The EIERA’s primary mandate is to provide financial assistance for energy and environmental projects and protect the environment. The agency also conducts research, supports energy efficiency and energy alternatives and promotes economic development. The EIERA operates on a request-only basis.
Forestry Policies (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Missouri's Forests are managed by the Department of Conservation. In 2010 the Department issued the State's Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy, which identified the goal of steering emerging woody biomass markets in a sustainable direction:

http://mdc.mo.gov/sites/default/files/resources/2010/08/9437_6407.pdf

The State offers a Wood Energy Tax Credit as a production incentive for utilization of forest products residues. The credit of five dollars per ton of woody biomass can be claimed for a period of five years:

http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/C100-199/1350000305.HTM


The Department has also issued the "Woody Biomass Harvesting Best Management Practices Manual", a booklet prepared to inform forest industry professionals of sustainable harvest guidelines:

http://mdc.mo.gov/sites/default/files/resources/2010/09/woody_biomass_harvesting_bmp_book.pdf
Grow Missouri Loan Fund (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Grow Missouri Loan Fund is open to private companies with fewer than 500 existing employees. One of the key advantages of the program is that the funding can be used as a prior commitment for obtaining future project funding. Principal and interest payments may be deferred for up to 3 years. Applicants must demonstrate a reasonable ability to create at least 1 new or retained job for every $75,000 of Grow Missouri Loan funding within 5 years of approval. Such new or retained jobs must have average wages that are at least 80% of the county average wage, or 70% within Enhanced Enterprise Zones or MBE/WBEs.

Generally, for-profit “primary” companies (that mostly sell/compete outside the local market area) are eligible. The applicant must offer to pay at least 50% health insurance for all Missouri employees.

The Grow Missouri funds and the other “leveraging sources of funds” (private loans and equity) to be used for the project may not be used for refinancing existing debt or replacing existing equity. There is no prohibition on the use of “non-leveraging sources” (direct public sector funding) for refinancing. None of the “leveraging sources of funds” can have been spent prior to the DED’s approval of an application.

The expansion project does not involve relocating the project facility from another community in Missouri, or if so, the existing community has endorsed the relocation to DED. Also, this project does not, or will not, cause the reduction of employment at a related facility located in Missouri.

The qualified company (including affiliates) must have less than 500 full-time employees (full-time equivalent basis) at all locations, inside or outside Missouri, at the time the application is submitted.

The Grow Missouri Loan cannot exceed: (a) 10% of the total “leveraging sources of funds” (private loans and equity); (b) $3 million per qualified company; or (c) $75,000 per new and/or retained job, whichever of these would result in the lowest amount.

Applications for the available funding of $10 million will be received at any time until the funding is exhausted.
Interconnection Guidelines (Missouri) Missouri Interconnection Yes State/Territory Missouri enacted legislation (S.B. 54) in June 2007 requiring all of the state's electric utilities -- including municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- to offer net metering to customers with systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using wind energy, solar-thermal energy, hydroelectric energy, photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells using hydrogen produced by any of these resources, and other sources of energy certified as renewable by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Systems must be intended primarily to offset part or all of a customer's own electrical energy requirements, and must be located on a facility owned, operated, leased or otherwise controlled by the customer. Administrative rules to implement S.B. 54 adopted by the Missouri Public Service Commission (PSC) took effect in February 2009. A subsequent June 2009 rulemaking order revised insurance requirements for customer-generators, effective September 30, 2009.

The PSC's rules only apply to the state's investor-owned utilities. Utilities not regulated by the commission -- electric cooperatives and municipal utilities -- were required to adopt initial rules by October 1, 2008, including regulations ensuring that simple contracts will be used for interconnection and net metering. The adopted rules include an all-in-one document that includes a simple interconnection request, simple procedures, and a brief set of terms and conditions.

Utilities must offer a net-metering tariff or contract that is identical in electrical energy rates, rate structure, and monthly charges to the contract or tariff that the customer would be assigned if the customer were not an eligible customer-generator. Utilities may not charge the customer any additional standby, capacity, interconnection, or other fee or charge that would not otherwise be charged if the customer were not an eligible customer-generator.

Systems must meet all applicable safety, performance, interconnection and reliability standards established by any local code authorities, the National Electrical Code (NEC), the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) for distributed generation. Utilities may require customers to provide a switch, circuit breaker, fuse or other easily accessible device or feature that allows the utility to manually disconnect the system.

In June 2009 the PSC adopted a minimum liability insurance requirement of $100,000 for systems larger than 10 kW. Systems of 10 kW and smaller are not required to have additional liability insurance. Insurance requirements may be met with an additional insurance policy or an endorsement on an existing policy. These requirements replace the former $100,000 minimum requirement for systems of up to 10 kW and $1 million minimum requirement for systems larger than 10 kW.

Applications for interconnection must be accompanied by a plan for the customer's system, including a wiring diagram and specifications for the generating unit. Utilities must review and respond to the customer within 30 days for systems up to 10 kW, and within 90 days for systems greater than 10 kW. Prior to interconnection, a customer must furnish the utility with certification from a qualified professional electrician or engineer that the installation complies with the established safety and operating requirements.

Any costs incurred by a utility under Missouri's net-metering statute are recoverable in the utility's rate structure. The estimated generating capacity of all net-metered systems counts towards the respective utility's accomplishment of any renewable-energy portfolio target or mandate adopted by Missouri. Each utility must file an annual report describing the status of its program.
Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) Alabama
Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Missouri
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact is administered by the Interstate Mining Compact Commission, which does not possess regulatory powers but “provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states” and thus aids the development of effective regulatory programs and environmental protection initiatives. The Commission exercises several powers on behalf of the states, all of which are of a study, recommendatory or consultative nature. The Commission does not possess regulatory powers, as some Compacts do. The Commission provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states. It is the potential to stimulate the development and production of each state's mineral wealth through effective regulatory programs that draws many of the states together in the prosecution of the Commission's work. Given the environmental sensitivities associated with this objective, a significant portion of the Commission's work is dedicated to the environmental protection issues naturally associated with this mineral development. It is the significant value and clout that comes from "compacting" together and speaking with a strong, united voice that can make a difference in each state's efforts to implement effective regulatory programs that will conserve natural resources and secure a vibrant state (and thus national) mineral economy.
Jefferson City - Property Assessed Clean Energy (Missouri) Missouri PACE Financing No Local Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. The Missouri legislature enacted the "Property Assessed Clean Energy Act" in July 2010. The act allows municipalities to create Clean Energy Development Boards, which are permitted to develop a local PACE program.

In January 2011, Jefferson City became the first city in Missouri to adopt the PACE ordinance. The program provides 100% of up-front costs for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects for residential and business properties. Jefferson City joined the Mid Missouri Clean Energy Development Board for the administration of their program.
Kansas City Power & Light - Solar Photovoltaic Rebates (Missouri) Missouri Utility Rebate Program Yes Utility Note: The one-time solar rebate cap in Greater Missouri Operations has been met. KCP&L is currently accepting solar rebate applications for the KCP&L Missouri area at $1.50 per watt.


Kansas City Power and Light and its affiliate Kansas City Power and Light Greater Missouri Operations (collectively referred to as KCP&L) offer rebates to their customers for the installation of net metered photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The program is available to all of KCP&L's Missouri retail customers on generally available residential, commercial, and industrial rate schedules. Only systems that become operational after December 31, 2009 are eligible for the rebate.

In order to qualify for the incentive, a customer must have an electric account in good standing with the utility. Eligible systems must use new, commercially available equipment and be permanently installed on the customer's property. Installations must comply with all applicable federal, state and local codes and standards, including the state of Missouri's Net Metering Interconnection Standards. Rebate recipients must certify that the system will remain in operation on their property for its useful life (deemed to be a minimum of 10 years).

This program arises from 2008 Proposition C, a ballot initiative that established a state renewable portfolio standard in Missouri and required the state's investor-owned utilities to offer solar rebates for new or expanded systems that became operational after December 31, 2009.
Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri) Missouri Personal Tax Incentives Yes State/Province The Land Assemblage Tax Credit Programs the redevelopment of blighted areas in Missouri into productive use. Redevelopers must incur acquisition costs for at least 50 acres of 75+ acre parcels, enter into redevelopment agreement, and be approved for redevelopment incentives. The maximum aggregate amount of tax credits for all projects is $95 million and while the maximum annual distribution for all projects is $20 million. Eligible land for this program must be at least 75 acres, 80% of which is in a distressed area.

State tax credits are provided to the redeveloper based on 50% of the acquisition costs and 100% of the interest costs incurred for a period of five years after the acquisition of an eligible parcel. Maintenance costs (boarding up and securing vacant structures, costs of removing trash, and costs of cutting grass and weeds) may also be included as acquisition costs.

No new authorizations may be made for this program. Existing projects with previous authorizations may complete their projects and may still achieve the program benefits subject to the program rules and any terms and conditions of their original award.
Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province It is the policy of the state to balance surface mining interests with the conservation of natural resources and land preservation. This Act authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the Department of Natural Resources to adopt and promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to land reclamation, addresses permitting procedures, and describes reclamation requirements and conditions.
Local Option - Clean Energy Development Boards (Missouri) Missouri PACE Financing Yes State/Territory Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, directed these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit PACENow for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.


PACE Overview


Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Missouri has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local jurisdictions in Missouri offer PACE financing. Contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)


Missouri Legislation


In July 2010 the Missouri legislature enacted the Property Assessed Clean Energy Act. The act allows municipalities (county, city, or incorporated town or village) to create Clean Energy Development Boards, which in turn are permitted to develop local PACE programs to finance energy efficiency improvements or renewable energy improvements. A clean energy development board may be created by an individual municipality or by multiple municipalities working together.


In January 2011 the Missouri Clean Energy District was created and is the primary mechanism for PACE financing for most of Missouri’s participating communities and counties; however, the Set the PACE St. Louis program implements PACE in St. Louis.


Eligible Projects


Many details of PACE implementation are left to the discretion of local governments. Local governments may develop programs that support both energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. Energy efficiency improvements include but are not limited to HVAC measures, building and equipment insulation, energy recovery systems, energy controls, caulking and weather-stripping, efficient lighting, daylighting, and certain windows and doors. Renewable energy improvements include but are not limited to solar photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal, wind, biomass, and geothermal energy systems.

Improvements must have a positive economic benefit over the term of the financing contract and contracts are limited to 20 years in length. Programs may offer PACE financing support for eligible improvements on any privately- or publicly-owned property. In order to participate in a program, property owners will enter into a special assessment contract with a clean energy development board where the property owner agrees to pay a special assessment in exchange for financing of a qualified improvement. The special assessment constitutes a lien on the property in question and will be collected in the same manner and with the same priority as ad valorem property taxes.

Administration


Clean energy development boards are invested with a variety of powers. As follows the general PACE model, the board is permitted to enter into assessment contracts with property owners and levy and collect special assessments under an assessment contract. A clean energy development board is also permitted to issue bonds or borrow money from any other private or public source. A board may also specify application and qualification criteria necessary to administer a program, including minimum energy efficiency standards, energy audits, and post-installation verification requirements.
Midwest Independent System Operator (Multiple States) Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Indiana
Kentucky
Manitoba
Interconnection Yes Non-Profit Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) is a Regional Transmission Organization, which administers wholesale electricity markets in all or parts of 11 U.S. states and the Canadian province of Manitoba. MISO administers electricity transmission grids across the Midwest and into Canada, and provides tools, transmission planning strategies, and integration for utilities in those markets. MISO is working with PJM Interconnection to develop complementing system operations and one robust, non-discriminatory wholesale electricity market to meet the needs of all customers and stakeholders in 23 states, the District of Columbia and the Canadian province of Manitoba. The market is being developed through an open stakeholder process and is being designed to serve residents regardless of whether they reside in states with bundled or unbundled retail rates.
Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States) Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Ohio
Wisconsin
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe disposal of commercial low-level radioactive waste. The Compact was enacted into law by each member state legislature during the period from 1982 through 1984, and received Congressional consent in 1985. The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact Commission is the administrative body of the Compact. It consists of one voting Commissioner from each of the six member states. Each state determines how it will appoint its Commissioner, and the state’s Governor must provide written notification to the Commission of the appointment of a Commissioner and any Alternate Commissioners.
Mining Regulations (Missouri) Missouri Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes State/Province This legislation applies to all mines in this state engaged in the mining or extraction of minerals for commercial purposes, except barite, marble, limestone, and sand and gravel, or the prospecting for or the production of petroleum or natural gas. The legislation contains information about mine inspections, fees, regulations pertaining to worker safety, air safety and electrical equipment, and ventilation.
Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Fund (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority’s (MASBDA) Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Fund offers financing to value-added agriculture enterprises, agriculture support businesses, marketers or retailers of agricultural products, and businesses with emerging agricultural technology. Funds may be used for costs associated with starting, acquiring, operating or expanding a qualifying Missouri agribusiness, including but not limited to: (a) Business construction, expansion, repair, modernization or development; (b) Purchase of land, buildings, machinery, or supplies; (c) Startup costs and working capital; (d) Pollution control and abatement; (e) Fees rendered by professional services as it relates to the business, including feasibility and marketing studies, legal fees, etc.
Missouri Air Conservation Law (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This law's purpose is to maintain the purity of the air resources of the state to protect the health, general welfare and physical property of the people, maximum employment and the full industrial development of the state. The Air Conservation Commission in the Department of Natural Resources is authorized to provide for the abatement and control of air pollution by all practical and economically feasible methods. The Commission may adopt and enact relevant regulations, establish maximum quantities of air contaminants, and regulate equipment known to be a source of air emissions. The statutes of Missouri prevent the state from enacting regulations stricter than federal law. Air permits, when triggered based on level of regulated emissions, are required prior to the construction or operation of any air contaminant source in the state.
Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The public policy of the state of Missouri is to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for public water supplies and for domestic, agricultural, industrial, recreational and other legitimate beneficial uses and for the propagation of wildlife, fish and aquatic life, as well as to provide for the prevention, abatement, and control of new or existing water pollution. No waste may be discharged into state waters without prior treatment, and permits are required for all pollutant discharges. Reasonable use projects are defined as projects that conform to all proper permitting and zoning requirements in the affected area. This law establishes the Clean Water Commission, which has the authority to adopt and promulgate regulations pertaining to water quality and pollution. The law contains additional information on permitted discharges, fees, effluent limitations, and construction permits.
Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive waste in the state of Missouri. This legislation contains additional information about the classification of hazardous waste, duties of hazardous waste generators and facilities, and the scope of the Commission's authority. A permit is required prior to the construction or operation of any hazardous waste facility. The legislation applies to the shipment of high-level radioactive waste.
Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (Missouri) Missouri Property Tax Incentive Yes State/Province The Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (MORESA) provides financial incentives for public infrastructure for the development of a renewable fuel production facility or eligible new generation processing entity facility, creating new jobs and agricultural product markets in rural Missouri. The local funding must be, at a minimum, 50% of the amount of the new local Economic Activity Tax (sales and utility tax, etc.), and 100% of the amount of the new real property tax created by the project each year, or a comparable amount of local funds from the municipality or a private non-profit organization. Qualified areas must be a contiguous development area, not encompassing more than 10% of the area of an eligible municipality. Any incorporated Missouri city, town, village or county established on or prior to January 1, 2001, having a population of 99,999 or less is also eligible for the program.
Missouri Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) Missouri Grant Program Yes State/Province The Missouri Value-Added Grant Program provides grants for projects that add value to Missouri agricultural products and aid the economy of a rural community. Grant applications will be considered for value-added agricultural business concepts that: (a) Lead to and result in development, processing and marketing of new or expanded uses or technologies for agricultural products; and (b) Foster agricultural economic development in Missouri’s rural communities. Applications will be considered for expenses related to the creation, development and operation of a value-added agricultural business.
Missouri Value-Added Loan Guarantee Program (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Missouri Value-Added Loan Guarantee Program provides a 50% first-loss guarantee to lenders who make agricultural business development loans for the acquisition, construction, improvement, or rehabilitation of agricultural property used for the purpose of processing, manufacturing, marketing, exporting, and adding value to an agricultural product.
Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Department of Natural Resources is responsible for ensuring that the quality and quantity of the water resources of the state are maintained at the highest level practicable to support present and future beneficial uses. The Department maintains an ongoing statewide surface and groundwater monitoring program and is authorized to enact regulations and restrict uses of certain water sources based on its findings. Additionally, the Department may establish special water quality protection areas where it finds a contaminant in a public water system in concentration that exceeds a maximum contaminant level that has been set by either the Department or the Environmental Protection Agency. Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, all Missouri landowners retain the right to have, use, and own private water systems and ground source systems anytime and anywhere including land within city limits, unless prohibited by city ordinance, on their own property so long as all applicable rules and regulations established by the Department are satisfied.
Natural Heritage Program (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Natural Heritage Reviews are conducted by the Missouri Department of Conservation on request in order to assess proposed project sites and adjacent lands. Reviews determine whether potential projects pose conservation concerns; i.e., whether they will impact endangered species habitats or other protected areas. Heritage reviews are normally sought by private or public projects seeking federal funding or permits. Such projects are required to investigate and plan for potential impacts to rare or endangered species in accordance with the federal Endangered Species Act or other statutes. However, anyone about to undertake a project and wanting to know if records indicate nearby sites of conservation concerns may request a heritage review.
Net Metering (Missouri) Missouri Net Metering Yes State/Territory Missouri enacted legislation in June 2007 (S.B. 54)* requiring all electric utilities -- investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- to offer net metering to customers with systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using wind energy, solar-thermal energy, hydroelectric energy, photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells using hydrogen produced by one of the aforementioned resources, and other sources of energy certified as renewable by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Systems must be intended primarily to offset part or all of a customer's own electricity requirements, and must be located on premises owned, operated, leased or otherwise controlled by the customer. The new law took effect January 1, 2008 although administrative rules for the implementation of net metering by Public Service Commission (PSC) regulated utilities** did not become effective until February 28, 2009. In June 2009 the PSC issued an additional rule making order (June 2009 PSC Order) revising liability insurance requirements for net metered systems. The revised rules removed all liability insurance requirements for systems up to 10 kW and reduced the minimum insurance requirement for systems larger than 10 kW from $1 million to $100,000. This revision took effect on September 30, 2009. Insurance requiprements may be met with an additional insurance policy or an endorsement on an existing policy.

Net metering is available until the total rated generating capacity of net-metered systems equals 5% of a utility's single-hour peak load during the previous year. However, in a given calendar year, the aggregate capacity of all approved applications for interconnection is limited to 1% of a utility's single-hour peak load for the previous calendar year. If a customer's existing metering equipment is not capable of measuring the net amount of electricity produced or consumed, or if it is necessary for the utility to install "additional distribution equipment to accommodate the customer-generator's facility," then the customer must pay for these costs.

Customer net excess generation (NEG) during a given billing period is credited to the customer's next bill at a rate at least equivalent the utility's avoided-cost rate. Credits expire 12 months after issuance without compensation. Utilities must offer a net-metering tariff or contract that is identical in electrical energy rates, rate structure, and monthly charges to the contract or tariff that the customer would be assigned if the customer were not an eligible customer-generator. Utilities may not charge the customer any additional standby, capacity, interconnection, or other fee or charge that would not otherwise be charged if the customer were not an eligible customer-generator. For systems of 10 kW or less, applications must include an all-in-one document that includes a simple interconnection request, simple procedures, and a brief set of terms and condition.

Any costs incurred by a utility under Missouri's net-metering statute are recoverable in the utility's rate structure. The estimated generating capacity of all net-metered systems counts towards the respective utility's accomplishment of any renewable-energy portfolio target or mandate adopted by Missouri. Each utility must file an annual report describing the status of its program.


**Prior to the June 2007 legislation, Missouri required certain utilities to offer “dual metering” to consumers. “Dual metering” is much less favorable to consumers than net metering.

    • Municipal utilities and electric cooperatives, which are not regulated by the PSC, are required to adopt initial rules by October 1, 2008, including regulations ensuring that simple contracts will be used for interconnection and net metering. The adopted rules include an all-in-one document that includes a simple interconnection request, simple procedures, and a brief set of terms and conditions.
New Generation Cooperative Incentive Tax Credit Program (Missouri) Missouri Personal Tax Incentives Yes State/Province The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority provides New Generation Cooperative Incentive Tax Credits to induce producer member investment into new generation processing entities that will process Missouri agricultural commodities and agricultural products into value-added goods, provide substantial benefits to Missouri’s agricultural producers, and create jobs for Missourians. New generation processing entities, partnerships, corporations, cooperatives, or limited liability companies that exist for the purpose of owning or operating within this state a development facility or a renewable fuel production facility are eligible for this program.
North American Renewables Registry (Multiple States) North Carolina
Kansas
Illinois
Missouri
Puerto Rico
Green Power Purchasing Yes Non-Profit The North American Renewables Registry (NAR) provides a Web-based platform trusted to create, track, and manage renewable energy certificate (REC) origination for clean generation facilities and states not covered by one of the existing APX-powered, regional systems. All market participants are able to take advantage of a trusted infrastructure to help manage their role in the market. With the ability to create unique, serialized records for every REC, the Registry provides product transparency, accountability and protection against double counting. The system has been designated as the compliance system for the Missouri Renewable Energy Standard (RES). The State of North Carolina has also designated NAR as an eligible registry for facilities located outside of North Carolina that seek to qualify for the North Carolina's Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard. Recently, the Kansas Corporation Commission decided to use NAR to verify RECs purchased by Kansas utilities and cooperatives for compliance with the Kansas Renewable Portfolio Standard. With this addition, renewable energy facilities registered in NAR can now be tagged as eligible for Kansas, Illinois, Missouri and Puerto Rico if they have met the applicable requirements as a renewable facility. Furthermore, NAR is currently able to export certificates to North Carolina Renewable Energy Tracking System (NC RETS) and accept imports of certificates from Western Renewable Energy Generation Information System (WREGIS), Michigan Renewable Energy Certification System (MIRECS), Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS) and NC RETS.
Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) Missouri Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This legislation contains additional information about the permitting, establishment, and operation of oil and gas wells, while additional regulations address oil and gas drilling and production and well spacing and unitization.
Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri) Missouri Bond Program Yes State/Province The Private Activity Bond Allocation Program provides low-interest financing through tax-exempt bonds for certain types of projects, including electric and gas utility projects. Eligible applicants include certain state agencies, cities, counties and industrial development authorities.
Public Service Commission and Natural Gas Safety Standards (Missouri) Missouri Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes State/Province This legislation establishes the state Public Service Commission, which has regulatory authority over the electric, gas, water, and telecommunications utilities. Section 386.572 of this legislation specifically addresses penalties for the violation of state or federal natural gas safety laws, rules, or standards by any corporation, person, public utility, or municipality that owns any gas plant. Additional regulations promulgated by the Commission address electric and gas utilities' terms of service, operations, safety and operational standards, and resource planning.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Missouri) Missouri Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Missouri as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (North Dakota, South Dakota) may be lower.
Renewable Electricity Standard (Missouri) Missouri Renewables Portfolio Standard Yes State/Territory In November 2008, voters in Missouri enacted Proposition C, a ballot initiative that repealed the state’s existing voluntary renewable energy and energy efficiency objective and replaced it with an expanded, mandatory renewable electricity standard of 15% by 2021. The standard also contains a solar electricity carve-out of 2% of each interim portfolio requirement meaning that by 2021, 0.3% of retail electricity sales must be derived from solar electricity.

Like the prior voluntary objective, the new standard applies only to the state’s investor-owned utilities* and does not place any requirements on municipal utilities or electric cooperatives. Energy efficiency measures are no longer eligible to be counted towards compliance with the standard, although sections directing state policy to “encourage” energy consumption reduction remain in effect.

The definition of eligible renewables was revised in July 2010 (S.B. 795) to include additional resources. Eligible renewables are now defined as electricity produced using solar photovoltaics; solar thermal; wind; small hydropower; biogas from agricultural operations, landfills and wastewater treatment plants; pyrolysis and thermal depolymerization of waste materials; various forms of biomass; fuel cells using hydrogen from renewable resources; and other renewable-energy resources approved by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Waste materials are defined as materials "specifically segregated materials from a waste stream for the purposes of producing energy or that are capable of producing energy." It is important to note that this definition does not include all municipal solid waste (MSW) technologies, though some MSW technologies may be eligible if powered by waste materials as defined in the administrative rules. Eligible hydropower facilities must have a generator nameplate rating of 10 megawatts (MW) or less and not require new water diversions or impoundments. Cofiring is permitted, but only the percentage of electricity generated by an eligible renewable resource can be counted towards a utility's renewable energy obligation. Pumped storage hydropower and nuclear energy are specifically identified as ineligible.

The standard sets the following minimum benchmarks for electric utilities based on annual electricity sales:

  • 2% from 2011 to 2013 (0.04% solar)
  • 5% from 2014 to 2017 (0.1% solar)
  • 10% from 2018 to 2020 (0.2% solar)
  • 15% for 2021 and thereafter (0.3% solar)

Compliance with the objective can be achieved through the procurement of renewable energy or renewable energy credits (RECs). A REC may be used for compliance with the standard for up to 3 years after the date it is generated. RECs can be used for compliance for the calendar year in which it expired as long as it was valid during some portion of the year. Solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) may be used to comply with the solar standard, or with the portion of the standard not specifically devoted to solar resources. A utility is permitted to retire RECs for compliance with standard for up to three months after the end of the compliance year (i.e., the calendar year). However, no more than 10% of the compliance obligation may be met in this way and the RECs retired must have been generated prior to the end of the compliance year. In-state renewable energy generation receives a multiplier of 1.25 compared to out-of-state generation (i.e., in-state generation is worth 25% more for compliance purposes). The revised rules contain no geographic or electricity delivery requirements for eligible resources. Owners of net-metered systems retain title to RECs derived from energy produced by the system unless they choose to transfer them.In January 2012, the PSC opened Case EW-2012-0255 to review the rules for the standard.

The law requires utilities with renewable energy obligations under the standard to offer rebates of at least $2 per watt for customer-sited solar electric systems of 25 kilowatts (kW) or less beginning in 2010. Systems of 100 kW or less qualify for rebates on the first 25 kW of installed capacity. Beginning in June 2014, the rebate will decrease annually until the rebates are phased out on June 30, 2020. Utilities own the RECs of any system that receives a rebate.

Utilities are also permitted, but not required, to offer standard offer contracts for the purchase of SRECs produced by a customer-generator system. Any SRECs purchased through standard offer contracts may not be sold or traded but may be used to comply with the standard.

Under the statute the PSC, in consultation with the DNR, was required to select an REC tracking and verification program within one year of the standard’s enactment. In January 2010 Missouri selected the North American Renewables Registry for this purpose. Utilities must use this system for REC accounting purposes unless they apply for and receive a waiver from the PSC for "good cause shown". Utilities may be excused from their obligation by the PSC for events beyond their control or if the cost of compliance with the standard increases retail electricity rates by more than 1% in any year. If the 1% cap is exceeded, the annual renewable energy obligation will be adjusted downward to a point where the cap is not violated.

Utilities are required to file compliance plans by April 15th each year describing how they will meet the standard for the current year and the two subsequent years. Utilities are also required to file annual reports demonstrating compliance with the standard by April 15 after the most recently completed year. The 2011 Compliance Reports are available here. Utilities that do not meet their renewable and solar portfolio obligations under the standard are subject to penalties of at least twice the market value of RECs or SRECs. The revenue associated with such penalties will be used by the DNR to purchase RECs or SRECs to offset the shortfall, with any excess revenue used to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. Costs associated with non-compliance penalties may not be recovered from ratepayers.

History 

In June 2007 Missouri enacted S.B. 54, creating a voluntary renewable energy and energy-efficiency objective for the state's investor-owned utilities. The objective required each utility to make a "good-faith effort" to generate or procure renewable electricity equivalent to 4% of total retail electric sales by 2012, 8% by 2015, and to 11% by 2020. Utilities could also receive credit towards the objective for verifiable reductions in energy consumption resulting from measures implemented by utilities and electricity consumers.


*Prior to Proposition C ballot initiative, in July 2008 the Missouri legislature enacted legislation (S.B. 1181) providing an exemption from the (yet to be enacted) solar energy standard and solar rebate offer requirement for any utility that had achieved eligible renewable energy technology nameplate capacity equal to or greater than 15% of the utility's total owned fossil-fired generating capacity by January 20, 2009. Empire District Electric, one of Missouri's four investor-owned utilities, has indicated that it qualifies for this exemption. The 1% retail cost cap for the standard was also contained in this legislation.
Renewable Energy Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement Missouri Property Tax Incentive Yes State/Territory Local areas in Mimssouri can be designated as Renewable Energy Generation Zones and receive property tax abatements as part of the Enhanced Enterprise Zone program. Legislation (H.B. 737) enacted in July 2011 allows for new, expanded, or replacement business facilities to receive a property tax exemption from the applicable local government authority. Local governments must award at least a 50% property tax abatement for 10-25 years for improvements made to real property in an Enhanced Enterprise Zone. In addition, local governments have the option of awarding up to a 100% property tax abatement for up to 25 years if the facility has created and maintained at least 50 jobs averaging at least 35 hours a week. In order to be designated as an Enhanced Enterprise Zone, the following criteria must be met:
  • New or expanded business facilities must hire and maintain positions for 2 new employees and make a new investment of at least $100,000
  • Replacement business facilities must hire and maintain positions for 2 new employees and make a new investment of at least $1,000,000
  • All facilities must provide health insurance at all times, of which at least 50% must be paid by the employer
A Renewable Energy Generation Zone must be an area found by the local governing body to be a blighted area, and must contain "land, improvements, or a lock and dam site which is unutilized or underutilized for the production, generation, conversion, and conveyance of electrical energy from a renewable energy resource." Eligible renewable resources include wind, solar thermal, photovoltaics, energy crops, cellulosic agricultural residues, plant residues, landfill gas or methane from agricultural operations or wastewater treatment, pyrolysis or thermal depolymerization, clean and untreated wood, hydroelectric power, and fuel cells using hydrogen produced from one of the eligible renewable resources. Application materials and instructions for Enhanced Enterprise Zone designation are available on the program web site.
Resource Recovery from Solid Waste (Missouri) Missouri Industry Recruitment/Support Yes State/Province This legislation establishes the state's support for the expansion and development of industries and commercial establishments which provide markets for materials and energy which can be recovered from solid waste, as well as for the development of a regulatory landscape that can aid the growth of solid waste management practices employing resource recovery.
Rights and Duties of Mines and Mine Owners, General (Missouri) Missouri Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes State/Province This legislation addresses general operational guidelines for mine owners regarding public notices, fees, land and mineral ownership, requirements for mining in certain municipalities, and mining permits.
Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) Missouri Bond Program Yes State/Province The Missouri Development Finance Board administers a Single-Issue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bond Program as well as a Taxable Industrial Revenue Bond Program. The Tax-Exempt Program finances (i) the acquisition, construction and equipping of qualified manufacturing production facilities and/or equipment, and (ii) refinances outstanding tax-exempt bonds. It provides low interest rate loans to qualified borrowers, and is limited to loans ranging from $400,000 to $20 million for industrial, manufacturing, production, or related support industries. Except for the refinancing of outstanding bond issues, commercial, non-manufacturing, real estate, retail and service projects are not eligible for the Tax-Exempt Program. The Taxable Bond Program also finances the acquisition, construction and equipping of qualified facilities and/or equipment. All types of retail, commercial and industrial projects qualify for participation in the Taxable Bond Program. The Taxable Bond Program provides competitive rate loans to qualified borrowers through the issuance of private activity, industrial revenue bonds by the Board.
Single-Purpose Animal Facilities Loan Guarantee Program (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority provides a 50 percent first-loss guarantee on collateralized loans up to $250,000 that lenders make to independent livestock producers to finance the acquisition, construction, improvement, rehabilitation, or operation of land, buildings, facilities, equipment, machinery, and animal waste facilities used to produce poultry, hogs, beef or dairy cattle or other animals in a single purpose animal facility.
Small Business Loan Program (Missouri) Missouri Loan Program Yes State/Province The Small Business Loan Program provides low-interest and no-interest direct loans for small businesses. The statewide program is open to all small businesses that employ 15 or fewer employees and that are Missouri-owned and operated. The maximum loan amount is $50,000 and the interest rate is 3%.
Solar Property Tax Exemption (Missouri) Missouri Property Tax Incentive Yes State/Territory In Missouri, solar energy systems not held for resale are exempt from state, local, and county property taxes. As enacted in July 2013, the law does not define solar energy systems.
Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or operation of any solid waste processing facility or disposal area. Local Solid Waste Management Districts can be organized in regions of the state; such districts have the authority to enact a solid waste management plan for solid waste disposal in their jurisdictions.
Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) Alabama
Arkansas
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Mississippi
Missouri
North Carolina
Oklahoma
Puerto Rico
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
United States Virgin Islands
Virginia
West Virginia
Industry Recruitment/Support
Environmental Regulations
Yes State/Province The Southern States Energy Compact provides for the proper employment and conservation of energy, and for the employment of energy-related facilities, materials, and products, within the context of a responsible regard for the environment, among the Southeastern states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Southern States Energy Board is responsible for administering the Compact and may adopt bylaws, rules, and regulations in conjunction with state agencies. The Board also encourages the development, conservation, and responsible use of energy and energy-related facilities, installations, and products as part of a balanced economy and a healthy environment.
Strip Mine Law (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This law authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the Department of Natural Resources to adopt and promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to strip mining of coal and reclamation, review all proposals, plans, and specifications for mining operations, and oversee land reclamation practices. Additional details, as well as permitting procedures, can be found in the text of the law.
Surface Coal Mining Law (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This law aims to provide for the regulation of coal mining in order to minimize or prevent its adverse effects, protect the environment to the extent possible, protect landowner rights, and prohibit coal mining in locations where reclamation is not feasible. The law aims to strike a balance between protection of the environment and agricultural productivity and the need for coal as an energy source. This law addresses the powers of the Land Reclamation Commission, permitting procedures for surface coal mining, reclamation plan requirements, and fees.
Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Missouri Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major water user may convey water withdrawn or diverted from within the southeast Missouri regional water district if such withdrawal or diversion and subsequent conveyance to a location outside the district unduly interferes with the reasonable and customary activities of a registered major water user located within the district.
Wood Energy Production Credit (Missouri) Missouri Corporate Tax Credit Yes State/Territory Note: No new credits are being issued, effective July 1, 2013. This entry is for informational purposes only.

The Wood Energy Tax Credit, as effective January 1, 1997, allows individuals or businesses processing Missouri forestry industry residues into fuels an income tax credit of $5.00 per ton of processed material (e.g., wood pellets). A multiplier of 4 applies to charcoal, based on the amount of Missouri forest industry residue required to produce one ton of charcoal. Any amount of credit exceeding the tax due by a company in the year of production may be carried over to a subsequent taxable year, not to exceed four years. A credit earned under this program may also be transferred to third parties for use within this five-year period. To be considered an eligible fuel, forestry industry residues must have undergone some thermal, chemical or mechanical process(es) sufficient to alter the residues into a fuel product. As a result of H.B. 2058 enacted in June 2008, no new credits will be issued after June 30, 2013.

Click here to access Missouri's Wood Energy Tax Credit Application Form.