Massachusetts/EZFeed Policies

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EZ Feed Policies for Massachusetts

Download EZFeed Policies for Massachusetts CSV (rows 1 - 27)

Policy Place Policy Type Active Affected Technologies Implementing Sector Summary
An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the Redevelopment of Contaminated Property - The “Brownfields” Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides liability relief and financial incentives aimed to encourage cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated sites. Financial incentives include encouraging private sector lending to developers, low-interest loans and grants for site assessment and cleanup, and tax credits.
Climate Action Plan (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Climate Policies Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province In August 2008, Governor Deval Patrick signed into law the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA), making Massachusetts one of the first states in the nation to move forward with a comprehensive regulatory program to address climate change.

The GWSA requires the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEEA), in consultation with other state agencies and the public, to set economy-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction goals for Massachusetts that will achieve reductions of between 10 percent and 25 percent below statewide 1990 GHG emission levels by 2020, and 80 percent below statewide 1990 GHG emission levels by 2050. It is in this context that EOEEA presents the Massachusetts Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2020. Secretary Bowles has set that 2020 limit at 25 percent — and the Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2020

contains the measures necessary to meet the limit.
Climate Protection and Green Economy Act, Global Warming Solutions Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Climate Policies Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This Act requires the Department of Natural Resources to monitor and regulate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to require emissions reporting and to establish a regional greenhouse gas registry. Emissions reporting is required from generation sources producing electricity that is consumed in the Commonwealth, as well as from all retail sellers of electricity.
Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS State/Province These regulations aim to ensure that any coal mining or extraction will be conducted in a manner that will not significantly damage the environment or area of land affected. The Department of Environmental Protection has the authority to grant licenses for coal mining, to protect public health and environment quality, and oversee all reclamation procedures. Any proposed exploration or mining for coal requires a license, and these regulations describe application procedures, powers of the Commissioner of the Department in the event of an emergency, and the authority to call a special investigating commission, and rules pertaining to water quality. Applications for a license must include an environmental impact report, a comprehensive reclamation plan, and public hearings and announcements.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Economic Development Incentive Program (EDIP) is a tax incentive program designed to foster job creation and stimulate business growth throughout the Commonwealth. Participating companies may receive state and local tax incentives in exchange for job creation, manufacturing job retention and private investment commitments.
Forestry Policies (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province Massachusetts has over 3 million acres of forested land, almost all private, managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation Forestry Bureau. The State issued in 2010 its Assessment and Strategy documents, including discussion of the potential for better utilization of forestry residues for energy generation. The Strategies document also mentions proposed legislation in this regard:

http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dcr/stewardship/forestry/assessment-of-forest-resources.pdf http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dcr/stewardship/forestry/massachusetts-forest-resources-strategies.pdf

The Bureau's Marketing and Utilization Program assists in business opportunities for wood products, including woody biomass for energy. Their website has several documents and resources related to woody biomass energy: http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dcr/conservation/forestry-and-fire-control/marketing-and-utilization-program.html

The State Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs recently updated its definitions of woody biomass to be qualified as eligible for inclusion in the State's RPS: http://www.mass.gov/eea/energy-utilities-clean-tech/renewable-energy/biomass/renewable-portfolio-standard-biomass-policy.html

The State Forestry Laws, Forms and Directions are compiled by the Department of Conservation and Recreation: http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dcr/conservation/forestry-and-fire-control/state-forestry-laws-forms-and-directions.html

Massachusetts law regulates the treatment of slash (forestry harvesting residues) to reduce the risk of fire as well as aesthetic impacts: http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dcr/stewardship/forestry/ma-forestry-bmp-manual-rd.pdf
ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Multiple States) Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont
Generating Facility Rate-Making Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit Under the Forward Capacity Market (FCM), ISO New England projects the capacity needs of the region’s power system three years in advance and then holds an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy those future regional requirements. Resources that clear in the auction are obligated to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO. The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New England states, and industry stakeholders to promote investment in generation and demand-response resources to meet future demand. The results ensure that the region will have sufficient resources to meet future demand. Resources that clear in the auction are committed to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO, or risk financial penalties.
Investments in Job Creation (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Public Benefits Fund Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) provides support to clean energy companies that are expanding their operations in Massachusetts. When considering possible support, key factors that MassCEC considers are the potential economic development impacts for Massachusetts and the number and nature of the jobs that will be created. The company’s geographic location within the Commonwealth is also a consideration. The investment structure and amount depends on these factors. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and a company needs to submit a business plan to apply.
Local Incentives (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Massachusetts Office of Business Development helps companies to identify communities interested in offering locally-negotiated incentives, such as Tax Increment Financing (TIF), Special Tax Assessment (STA), and property tax exemption or reduction.
Manufacture and Sale of Gas and Electricity (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province These regulations describe service territories, service quality standards, consumer protections, relevant costs and financing, construction procedures, stock ownership, taxes, provisions for public participation, determination of environmental impacts, use of eminent domain, authority to shut down and restore service, cooperatives, and the issuance of bonds as they relate to the manufacture or sale of gas and electricity in Massachusetts. The regulations contain several sections specific to certain types of electricity generation, including solar energy, hydropower, natural gas, and small renewable energy generation facilities.
Massachusetts Clean Air Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The Act contains regulations to prevent the pollution and contamination of the atmosphere. The Act establishes a contiguous metropolitan pollution control district, comprised of towns in the greater Boston area. The Department of Environmental Protection is responsible for controlling pollution levels in this district, and has the authority to prescribe and establish, amend or repeal, rules and regulations to prevent pollution or undue contamination of the atmosphere within said district. Other municipalities may apply to the Department to form additional pollution control districts. Regulations pertaining to this Act can be found in 310 CMR 7.00-8.00.
Massachusetts Clean Waters Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This Act establishes a Division of Water Pollution Control within the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. The Division is responsible for establishing a program for the prevention, control, and abatement of water pollution, as defined in Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 21, sec. 27. The discharge of pollutants into water requires a permit, proceedings for which are outlined in sec. 43. Under the Act, the Secretary of Environmental Affairs may also designate “areas of special interest” within the waters of Massachusetts, and promulgate rules and regulations that pertain specifically to these areas. Regulations pertaining to this Act can be found in 257 CMR 2.00 (certification of wastewater treatment plant operators) and 314 CMR 1.00-15.00 (2.00: permit procedures; 3.00 and 4.00: surface water; 7.00: sewer system; 8.00: hazardous waste management facilities; 9.00: discharge of dredged or fill material; 12.00: wastewater treatment plant standards).
Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern. Priority habitats are defined as the geographic areas in which these state-listed species live, and an interactive map of priority habitats can be found on the website of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Some limited construction, maintenance, and removal activities on buildings or infrastructure are allowed within these priority areas, but many are either prohibited or require special permits. Significant habitats are defined as specialized habitat types to which some species are restricted (e.g., sandplain grasslands, floodplain forests, and estuaries). The designation of “significant habitat” is much more restrictive than that of “priority habitat”; these habitats are off-limits to most types of development, and many proposed activities require Alteration Permits. However, no significant habitats have been designated to date. A full list of activities requiring permits is available here: http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/natural-heritage/publications-forms/forms/
Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
State/Province This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The committee will be responsible for negotiating with the developer of the proposed facility, representing the interests of the community, reviewing project documents, and, if applicable, signing contracts on behalf of the community. The developer and local assessment committee must settle upon a siting agreement prior to the construction, maintenance, and/or operation of a hazardous waste facility; the agreement will specify the terms, conditions, and provisions for the facility. This Act also establishes arbitration procedures in the event a dispute occurs with the host community or any abutting community, and allows for the use of eminent domain to secure land in certain situations. Specific regulations regarding this Act can be found in 310 CMR 30.000 and in 990 CMR 1.00-16.00.
Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short term containment of hazardous waste on the premises of the person who generated said waste may be exempt from this license requirement. The Act further establishes a Hazardous Waste Advisory Committee to provide consultation to the Department of Environmental Protection, and a Division of Hazardous Waste within the Department. The Department will supervise the maintenance and operation of all facilities related to hazardous waste, require that all licensed facilities possess liability insurance, maintain communication with the local Board of Health, provide for the surveillance of hazardous waste processing, and take other actions related to management and surveillance of, and education regarding, hazardous waste. Specific regulations regarding this Act can be found in 310 CMR 30.000.
Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Siting and Permitting Yes Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
State/Province The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan identified certain state waters that are eligible for offshore wind, wave and tidal energy development and other state waters where such development is prohibited. To see the plan, go to http://www.mass.gov/eea/waste-mgnt-recycling/coasts-and-oceans/mass-ocean-plan/final-massachusetts-ocean-management-plan.html
Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release occurs. Specific regulations regarding this Act can be found in 310 CMR 40.0000.
Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Malden, New Bedford, Somerville, Springfield, Winthrop, and Worcester; and in "densely developed areas," which are designated by the Secretary of the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. The law does not create a new permitting process, but rather builds on the strength of the existing procedures under the Wetlands Protection Act. The local conservation commission or the state Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) reviews projects to ensure that the riverfront area is protected for the eight interests in the Wetlands Act: the protection of public and private water supply, protection of groundwater supply, protection of land containing shellfish, protection of wildlife habitat, flood control, storm damage prevention, prevention of pollution, and protection of fisheries. The law also establishes the policy of the state to protect the natural integrity of rivers and to encourage and establish open space along rivers. Regulations pertaining to densely developed areas can be found in 301 CMR 10.00.
Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Energy Storage
Nuclear
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to settle disputes regarding the construction and operation of dams on non-navigable waters. Dam construction or alteration is allowed on non-navigable waters with a permit from the Department of Environmental Protection, but others affected by the dam can file civil suits and potentially obtain monetary compensation for damages to land. Existing dams are not affected by this section; however, material alterations to dams that may cause further damage to others' land (e.g., raising the dam, altering the machinery or method of water flow) may also result in a civil suit. Construction and operation of dams on navigable streams or across the outlets of great ponds is not permitted without a license from the Department of Environmental Protection. All dams must be registered with the Department. The regulations accompanying this legislation, in 321 CMR 10.00, contain criteria for the design and construction of new dams.
New England Power Pool (Multiple States) Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
Interconnection Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit Independent System Operator (ISO) New England helps protect the health of New England's economy and the well-being of its people by ensuring the constant availability of electricity, today and for future generations. ISO New England meets this obligation in three ways: by ensuring the day-to-day reliable operation of New England's bulk power generation and transmission system, by overseeing and ensuring the fair administration of the region's wholesale electricity markets, and by managing comprehensive, regional planning processes.
Public Waterfront Act - Chapter 91 (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This Act contains a number of regulations regarding the construction of structures and other activity near rivers, streams, harbors, and tidelands. Regulations pertaining to this Act can be found in 310 CMR 9.00 (waterways regulations) and 301 CMR 20.00-26.00 (coastal zone management program).
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Massachusetts as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont) may be lower.
Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Siting and Permitting Yes Coal with CCS
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province These sections articulate rules for the maintenance and operation of solid waste disposal facilities, as well as site assignment procedures. Applications for site assignment will be reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection as well as the Department of Public Health, and local Boards of Health in host or abutting municipalities. Judgments regarding the suitability of proposed sites will consider the proximity of surface water sources and groundwater, the proximity of residential areas and availability of access roads, and the potential for adverse impacts on air quality, public health, traffic patterns, agricultural uses of nearby land, and wildlife. The proximity of other solid waste disposal facilities will also be considered. Regulations pertaining to this chapter can be found in 310 CMR 16.00 (site assignment) and 19.00 (facility regulations).
Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management practices and to mitigate adverse effects, such as mercury release, from solid waste disposal. Included are regulations pertaining to combustion of waste. Regulations pertaining to this chapter can be found in 310 CMR 16.00 (site assignment) and 19.00 (facility regulations).
Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Energy Storage
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This Act, revised significantly in 2006, seeks to mitigate the use of toxic substances and the production of toxic byproducts through reporting requirements as well as resource conservation plans and environmental management systems for businesses. Regulations pertaining to this act can be found in 310 CMR 50.00.
Water Management Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water Resources Management Advisory Committee within the MA Department of Environmental Protection to oversee the development of standards, rules and regulations for water resources management. The DEP, after consultation with the advisory committee and with the approval of the commission, shall adopt such regulations as it deems necessary for the purposes of this chapter, establishing a mechanism for managing ground and surface water in the commonwealth as a single hydrological system and ensuring, where necessary, a balance among competing water withdrawals and uses. Additionally, this Act requires certificates to be obtained prior to any well drilling activity. These regulations can be found in the Water Management Policy: http://www.mass.gov/dep/water/approvals/appendix.pdf. Regulations regarding this Act, which comprise the Water Resources Management Program, can be found in 310 CMR 36.00, 313 CMR 2.00, 4.00, and 5.00.
Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This Act establishes regulations regarding the removal, dredging, filling, and altering of land bordering waters, allowing such activity only with permits and in certain situations. Specific regulations relevant to this Act can be found in 310 CMR 10.00 (general regulations), 12.00 (coastal wetlands), 13.00 (inland wetlands), and 23.00 (abandoned cranberry bogs).