LiDAR

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Exploration Technique: LiDAR

Exploration Technique Information
Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques
Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors
Parent Exploration Technique: Active Sensors
Information Provided by Technique
Lithology:
Stratigraphic/Structural: delineate faults,
create high-resolution DEMS,
quantify fault kinemaics,
develop lineament maps
Hydrological:
Thermal:
Cost Information
Low-End Estimate (USD): 300.0030,000 centUSD
0.3 kUSD
3.0e-4 MUSD
3.0e-7 TUSD
/ sq. mile
Median Estimate (USD): 850.0085,000 centUSD
0.85 kUSD
8.5e-4 MUSD
8.5e-7 TUSD
/ sq. mile
High-End Estimate (USD): 1,300.00130,000 centUSD
1.3 kUSD
0.0013 MUSD
1.3e-6 TUSD
/ sq. mile
Time Required
Low-End Estimate: 9 days0.0246 years
216 hours
1.286 weeks
0.296 months
/ job
Median Estimate: 19 days0.052 years
456 hours
2.714 weeks
0.624 months
/ job
High-End Estimate: 53 days0.145 years
1,272 hours
7.571 weeks
1.741 months
/ job
Additional Info
Cost/Time Dependency: Point Spacing, Size, Terrain, Airspace Restrictions
Dictionary.png
LiDAR:
Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology that uses optical measurements of scattered light to find range (Young, 2006). Measurements can be made from aircraft- or land-based sensors. Distance to an object is determined by the time delay between transmission and detection of a laser pulse. It is accurate to within 0.1 m (at 1-m resolution, 0.3 m at 3-m resolution) and has the ability to measure the land surface elevation beneath the vegetation canopy.
Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle



 
Use in Geothermal Exploration
LiDAR data has been used in geothermal exploration in the creation of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models DEMs, in delineating faults, detecting and quantifying fault kinematics and in the development of lineament maps.

High-Resolution DEMs
LiDAR is commonly used for geothermal applications to create high-resolution DEMs and detect elevation changes between repeat surveys. It is accurate to within 0.1 m (at 1-m resolution, 0.3 m at 3-m resolution) and has the ability to measure the land surface elevation beneath the vegetation canopy.
Delineating Faults
LiDAR has the potential to aid geothermal exploration by delineating faults in densely forested areas such as the Pacific Northwest (i.e., the Cascades) and Alaska.
Detect and Quantify Fault Kinematics
LiDAR can used in conjunction with geodetic surveys to detect and quantify fault kinematics.[1]
Lineament Maps
Lineament maps have been made from LiDAR data collected for the DOE-Ormat project at the Glass Buttes Geothermal Area. Lineament maps are a new use of LiDAR data and are not difficult to create.

 
Related Techniques



 
Data Access and Acquisition
Places to get data

  • Non-military federal government LiDAR data is not collected for general use by the public, so it must be obtained commercially.
  • Research-grade, public datasets are available through the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) for no cost, but coverage is very limited.
  • Some states agencies (e.g., Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries) have contracts with LiDAR collection companies to collect and provide LiDAR data to the public for the entire state.

 
Best Practices
LiDAR data are very helpful for the expert in the 3D visualization of geothermal data for exploration and reservoir interpretation purposes. Managers and investors in hydrothermal exploration projects are more used to looking at bulls-eye type images that will tell them where a resource is located and where the best locations are to drill. This can be addressed by taking a particular mineral or mineral assemblage of interest and creating a mineral contour map.










Page Area Activity Start Date Activity End Date Reference Material
LiDAR (Laney, 2005) Unspecified


LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Unspecified


LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Unspecified


LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) Unspecified


LiDAR (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) Unspecified


LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Chocolate Mountains Area


LiDAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Helton, Et Al., 2011) Dixie Valley Geothermal Area 2011 2011


LiDAR At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Gabbs Valley Area


LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Glass Buttes Area


LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area


LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area



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