Lava Dome

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Lava Dome

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Lava Dome:
Lava domes, also known as volcanic domes, are bulbous mounds formed via the slow eruption of viscous lava from a volcano. They are commonly encountered in the craters or on the flanks of large stratovolcanoes.
Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle


Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical lava dome.[1]

Topographic Features

List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas:

"Volcanic or lava domes are formed by relatively small, bulbous masses of lava too viscous to flow any great distance; consequently, on extrusion, the lava piles over and around its vent. A dome grows largely by expansion from within. As it grows its outer surface cools and hardens, then shatters, spilling loose fragments down its sides. Some domes form craggy knobs or spines over the volcanic vent, whereas others form short, steep-sided lava flows known as "coulees." Volcanic domes commonly occur within the craters or on the flanks of large composite volcanoes. The nearly circular Novarupta Dome that formed during the 1912 eruption of Katmai Volcano, Alaska, measures 800 feet across and 200 feet high. The internal structure of this dome--defined by layering of lava fanning upward and outward from the center--indicates that it grew largely by expansion from within."[1]

Examples

Want to add an example to this list? Select a Geothermal Resource Area to edit its "Topographic Features" property using the "Edit with Form" button.

CSV
Geothermal
Resource
Area
Geothermal
Region
Tectonic
Setting
Host
Rock
Age
Host
Rock
Lithology
Mean
Capacity
Mean
Reservoir
Temp
Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 John Watson. Principal Types of Volcanoes [Internet]. 2011. U.S. Geological Survey. [updated 2011/01/03;cited 2013/12/24]. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volc/types.html