Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island)

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Last modified on February 12, 2015.

Rules Regulations Policies Program

Place Rhode Island

Name Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island)
Incentive Type Interconnection
Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial, Fed. Government, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government, Multi-Family Residential, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government
Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Solar Thermal Electric, Wind
Active Incentive Yes

Implementing Sector State/Territory
Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs

Applicable Utilities Investor-owned utilities











External Disconnect Switch Not addressed


Insurance Requirements Not addressed



Net Metering Required No








Standard Agreement No

System Capacity Limit Not specified















Last DSIRE Review 2012-10-01
Last Substantive Modification
to Summary by DSIRE
2011-09-14


References DSIRE[1]


Summary

Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state’s distribution grid. Rhode Island’s interconnection policy is not nearly as comprehensive as interconnection standards established by many other states. The new application process, which took effect in July 2011, applies to the state's electric distribution companies, including National Grid.

Under this process, an interconnection applicant must submit an application to the utility for an impact study, including a request for an estimate of the cost of interconnecting the proposed system. The applicant may choose to request a feasibility study prior to requesting an impact study. The utility must provide a feasibility study, if requested, within 30 days of receipt of a completed application, and it must provide an impact study within 90 days of receipt of a completed application.

There is no feasibility study fee for residential systems up to 25 kilowatts (kW) that comply with UL 1741.1. There is a $50 fee for residential systems greater than 25 kW that comply with UL 1741.1. For non-residential systems, the feasibility study fee ranges from $100 to $2,500, depending on system size and whether the system complies with UL 1741.1.

There is no impact study fee for residential systems up to 25 kW that comply with UL 1741.1. There is a $100 fee for residential systems greater than 25 kW that comply with UL 1741.1. For non-residential systems, the impact study fee ranges from $500 to $10,000, depending on system size and whether the system complies with UL 1741.1. This fee structure will remain in effect through December 31, 2012. The Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is authorized to raise fee levels beginning January 1, 2013.

National Grid has incorporated these provisions into its "Standards for Interconnection of Distributed Generation." These standards are included in National Grid's tariffs, which are accessible via the PUC's web site.

 

Incentive Contact

Contact Name Consumer Information
Department Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission

Address 89 Jefferson Boulevard

Place Warwick, RI
Zip/Postal Code 02888
Phone (401) 941-4500

Fax (401) 277-6805

Website http://www.ripuc.state.ri.us
     
     

Authorities (Please contact the if there are any file problems.)

Authority 1: R.I. Gen. Laws § 39-26.3
Date Effective 2011-06-29
Date Enacted 2011-06-29


















  • Incentive and policy data are reviewed and approved by the N.C. Solar Center's DSIRE project staff.[2]

References

  1.  "DSIRE"
  2.  "Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE)"