Indiana/EZ Policies

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EZ Policies for Indiana

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Download EZ Policies for Indiana CSV (rows 1 - 79)

Policy Place Policy Type Active Implementing Sector Summary
Air Pollution Control (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The mission of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management's Office of Air Quality implements federal and state regulations to protect human health and the environment while allowing the environmentally sound operations of industrial, agricultural, commercial and governmental activities vital to a prosperous economy. The mission of the Office is to assure that the air in Indiana meets the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for each of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the federal Clean Air Act (CAA); to provide timely, quality air permits without unnecessary requirements and to verify compliance with applicable state and federal air pollution laws and regulations.

OAQ is comprised of five branches, each with specific air quality responsibilities. Most branches in OAQ are divided into sections that handle certain aspects of branch responsibilities.

The Office implements and enforces rules established by the Environmental Rules Board, which was created by the 2012 Indiana General Assembly and consolidates the Air Pollution Control Board, Water Pollution Control Board, and Solid Waste Management Board.
Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Indiana Industry Recruitment/Support Yes State/Province This legislation aims to encourage the development of alternative energy, cogeneration, and small hydropower facilities. The statute requires utilities to enter into long-term contracts with these facilities and provide supplemental or backup power to such facilities at reasonable rates, to be established by the Utility Regulatory Commission. Some exceptions apply.
Alternative Energy Projects by Rural Electric Membership Corporations (Indiana) Indiana Industry Recruitment/Support
Performance-Based Incentive
Property Tax Incentive
Corporate Tax Incentive
Grant Program
Personal Tax Incentives
Rebate Program
Yes State/Province This legislation encourages the development of alternative energy projects using clean or renewable resources by rural electric membership corporations. The section establishes the Office of Alternative Energy Incentives within the Office of Energy Development, as well as an alternative energy incentive fund to aid corporations in project implementation. The chapter describes application procedures to this fund and procedures for joint development of projects.
Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities. This legislation exempts biomass anaerobic digestion and biomass gasification facilities from regulation as a solid waste processing facility, unless otherwise determined by the Department.
City of Bloomington - Sustainable Development Incentives (Indiana) Indiana Green Building Incentive Yes Local The City of Bloomington offers fee waivers and other design incentives for developers that incorporate the city's sustainability goals. The city's four goals include:


  • Energy and resource efficiency including green roofs, improved building performance rating, non-polluting energy resources, renewable on-site energy sources, recycling and/or salvaging at least 50% of non-hazardous construction and demolition debris, and utilizing building materials and products sourced within a 500 mile radius.
  • Landscape and site design including vegetation, storm water, recycled greywater, and permeable pavement technologies.
  • Public policy including policies that incorporate mixed-use development and promote alternative transportation.
  • Public transportation including locating projects near transit stops, downtown, multi-use trails, public schools, parks, or activity centers.

Incentives are based on a tier system with three different levels:


  • Level 1 Requirements: At least 2 energy and resource efficiency projects, 1 landscape and site design project, 1 public policy project, and 1 public transportation project.
  • Level 2 Requirements: At least 3 energy and resource efficiency projects, 2 landscape and site design projects, 2 public policy projects, and 2 public transportation projects.
  • Level 3 Requirements: At least 4 energy and resource efficiency projects, 2 landscape and site design projects, 2 public policy projects, 2 public transportation projects. In addition, at least 15% of housing must be allocated for affordable housing units.

All 3 levels are eligible for fee waivers of filing fees with the plan commission and/or board of zoning appeals, fees associated with right-of-way excavation permits, and sewer hook-on fees. In addition, projects may be subject to less strict development standards.


  • Level 1 Residential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased to 6 feet and rear building setbacks decreased to 20 feet.
  • Level 1 Nonresidential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased by 25%, rear building setbacks decreased by 25%, and maximum residential density increased by 25%.
  • Level 2 Residential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased to 5 feet and rear building setbacks decreased to 15 feet.
  • Level 2 Nonresidential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased by 50%, rear building setbacks decreased by 50%, and maximum residential density increased by 50%.
  • Level 3 Residential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased to 5 feet and rear building setbacks decreased to 15 feet.
  • Level 3 Nonresidential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased by 50%, rear building setbacks decreased by 50%, and maximum residential density increased by 75%.
Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province A public utility may not use clean coal technology at a new or existing electric generating facility without first applying for and obtaining from the Utility Regulatory Commission a certificate that states that public convenience and necessity will be served by the use of clean coal technology. Some exemptions apply. This statute describes the requirements for obtaining a certificate of necessity.
Clean Energy Portfolio Goal Indiana Renewables Portfolio Standard Yes State/Territory In May 2011, Indiana enacted SB 251, creating the Clean Energy Portfolio Standard (CPS). The program sets a voluntary goal of 10% clean energy by 2025, based on the amount of electricity supplied by the utility in 2010. The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted emergency rules (RM #11-05) for the CPS in December 2011. Final rules were adopted in June 2012, effective July 9, 2012.

Utility Participation

In order to participate in the program, electric utilities must apply directly to the IURC no later than 2 years after the beginning of Goal Periods I or II, as outlined below. Only public utilities may participate in the program; municipally-owned utilities, rural electric cooperatives, or electric cooperatives with at least one rural electric cooperative member may not participate in the program. Applications must include a plan to meet the goals, including a detailed business plan and the identification of specific projects and resources.

  • Goal Period I: Between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2018, an average of at least 4% of electricity supplied must be from clean energy
  • Goal Period II: Between January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2024, an average of at least 7% of electricity supplied must be from clean energy
  • Goal Period III: Between January 1, 2025 and December 31, 2025, an average of at least 10% of electricity supplied must be from clean energy

Utilities that participate in the program and meet the program goals are eligible for incentives which are used to pay for the compliance projects. A utility may apply to the commission to increase its Return on Equity by as much as 50 basis points over its current rate of return, or request a periodic rate adjustment mechanism. Applications to receive incentives must be filed no later than 6 months after the end of each Goal Period.

Program reports from each utility are due annually on March 1 beginning in 2014. Reports must include a detailed explanation and supporting documentation of any requests for rate adjustments for cost recovery associated with the CPS program.

Eligible Resources Clean energy technologies include wind; solar energy; photovoltaic cells and panels; dedicated crops grown for energy production; organic waste biomass, including agricultural crops, agricultural wastes and residues, wood residues, forest thinnings, mill residue wood, animal wastes, animal byproducts, aquatic plants and algae; hydropower; fuel cells; hydrogen; energy from waste to energy facilities, including energy derived from advanced solid waste conversion technologies; energy storage systems or technologies; geothermal energy; coal bed methane; industrial byproduct technologies that use fuel or energy that is a byproduct of an industrial process; waste heat recovery from capturing and reusing the waste heat in industrial processes for heating or for generating mechanical or electrical work; and demand side management or energy efficiency initiatives.

Up to 30% of the goal may be met with clean coal technology; nuclear energy; combined heat and power systems; natural gas that displaces electricity from coal; clean coal technology; and net-metered distributed generation facilities. Fifty percent of qualifying energy obtained by Indiana utilities participating in the CPS must come from within the state. Thermal energy used for heating, cooling, or mechanical work is eligible for the goal. In order to measure thermal energy for the purpose of goal compliance, it may be measured directly through a meter, calculated using an equation set forth in IAC 17.1, or a utility may seek approval from the commission to use an alternative equation.

Utilities may purchase, sell, or trade Clean Energy Credits, which are defined as 1 MW of clean energy (as defined above) or 3,412,000 BTUs. Any excess amounts of clean energy supplied during a specific goal period, or any Clean Energy Credits purchased from another supplier, may be counted toward the next goal period. Other than this exception, all clean energy sources must be in service, purchased, or contracted for by the effective dates of the CPS program goals.
Climate Action Plan (Indiana) Indiana Climate Policies No State/Province The State of Indiana does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Community Conservation Challenge (Indiana) Indiana State Grant Program Yes State/Territory Note: The Community Conservation Challenge (CCC) program is generally offered in the Fall. 2015 Applications will be available soon.


The Indiana Office of Energy Development (OED) is offering grants under the CCC program. Non-residential entities may apply to receive $25,000-$100,000 for community energy conservation projects. Projects must be located in Indiana and must use commercially-available technologies. The project must be visible to the public and have at least one community partner, though priority will be given to projects with support from multiple organizations. A cost share is not required but applicants are encouraged to leverage other funds in lieu of cost share.


Applicants may apply for either an Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy grant or an Alternative Fuel Vehicles grant. Eligible projects include projects that demonstrate measurable improvements in energy efficiency or renewable energy, projects that result in a reduction in energy demand or fuel consumption, or projects that implement an energy recycling process. Eligible technologies include alternative fuel on-road vehicles, biomass, energy efficiency including HVAC, lighting, and traffic signals, combined heat and power, geothermal, solar, solar hot water, waste management and recycling, water systems, and wind.


Applications are limited to one per applicant, and necessary materials are located on the program web site.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Construction of Channels (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Permission is required from the Natural Resources Commission is required for the construction or alteration of artificial channels or improved channels of natural watercourses that connect to any river or stream in Indiana for the purpose of providing access by boat or otherwise to public or private industrial, commercial, housing, recreational, or other facilities. Prior approval by Department of Environmental Management is required for sewage disposal facilities involved with the channel and each facility that the channel is to serve before the Commission can consider the application.
Economic Development Project Districts (Indiana) Indiana Enterprise Zone Yes State/Province Redevelopment commissions may petition legislative bodies to designate economic development project districts in cities with populations between 80,500 and 500,000. Such districts may be established if it is found that the completion of the redevelopment and economic development of the district will attract new business enterprises to the district or retain or expand existing business enterprises in the district, benefit the public health and welfare and be of public utility and benefit, protect and increase state and local tax bases or revenues, and result in a substantial increase in temporary and permanent employment opportunities and private sector investment within the district. Once established, improvement projects in these districts may be eligible for bond financing, remitted funds, and tax incentives.
Economic Development and Pollution Control (Indiana) Indiana Bond Program Yes State/Province This legislation establishes possible financing avenues for pollution control facilities that may mitigate or reduce pollution, or treat substances in processed materials that may cause pollution. The legislation specifically coal with CSS using coal from Indiana mines as preferable and eligible for financing through bonds.
Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) Indiana Corporate Tax Incentive Yes State/Province The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit is awarded to businesses with projects that result in net new jobs. The tax credit must be a major factor in the company’s decision to move forward with the project in Indiana. The refundable tax credit is calculated as a percentage of the expected increased tax withholdings generated from the new jobs. The credit is phased in over ten years.
Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana) Indiana Industry Recruitment/Support
Bond Program
Yes State/Province A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to issue revenue bonds to finance economic improvement projects.
Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and unincorporated areas of Indiana are divided into geographic areas, to be assigned to an electricity provider that will have the sole right to furnish retail electric service to customers.
Eminent Domain (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province Utilities, corporations, and gas storage facilities may invoke the law of eminent domain in certain circumstances, as provided for in this legislation.
Environmental Compliance Plans (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This legislation provides regulations pertaining to state enforcement of the federal Clean Air Act. The legislation specifically addresses the use of coal, and remedial actions if the implementation of a compliance plan results in the diminished use of coal in Indiana.
Environmental Impact Statements (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This chapter establishes the responsibility of the state to preserve and enhance the environment. State agencies are required to consider environmental science and impacts in any planning and/or decision making that may have an impact on the environment. Proposals for legislation or other major state actions must include an environmental impact statement and possible alternatives to the proposed action. The air pollution control board, water pollution control board, and solid waste management board shall by rule define the actions that constitute a major state action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment.
Financing of Substitute Natural Gas Costs (Indiana) Indiana Industry Recruitment/Support Yes State/Province This statute encourages the development of local coal gasification facilities to produce substitute natural gas, calls on state energy utilities to enter into long-term contracts for the purchase of substitute natural gas produced by such facilities, and provides regulations to govern such transactions.
Forestry Policies (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Indiana's forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry. The Department issued in 2008 the State's Strategic Plan:

http://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/files/fo-Forestry-Strategic-Plan-2008-2013.Final.pdf

The State DNR has also issued the resource inventory document "Woody Biomass Feedstock for the Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industries": http://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/files/fo-WoodyBiomass_final.pdf

The DNR has summarized its harvesting guidelines in the document "Harvesting Biomass: A Guide to Best Management Practices", focused on recommendation for sustainable harvesting of biomass energy resources:

http://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/files/fo-BiomassGuide.pdf
Gas Pipeline Safety (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province This section establishes the Pipeline Safety Division within the Utility Regulatory Commission to administer federal pipeline safety standards and establish minimum state safety standards for transportation and related pipeline facilities.
Gas Pipeline Securities (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province This statute establishes that entities engaged in the transmission of gas by pipelines are not required to obtain the consent of the Utility Regulatory Commission for issuance of stocks, certificates, bonds, or similar documents, or for the sale, transfer, or lease of its facilities or corporation.
Gas Pipelines, County Roads (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes Local A contract with any Board of County Commissioners is required prior to the construction of a pipeline, conduit, or private drain across or along any county highway. The contract will include terms obliging the project owner to restore the county highway after construction and compensate the county for use of the land.
Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state) Illinois
Indiana
Minnesota
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Ontario
Quebec
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council, which is responsible for water conservation and efficiency programs and reviewing proposed projects. Projects which may lead to new or increased water diversions are limited; exceptions are described in this statute. More information can be found on the website of the Council: http://www.glslcompactcouncil.org/
Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these statutes.
Hoosier Business Investment Tax Credit (Indiana) Indiana Corporate Tax Incentive Yes State/Province The Hoosier Business Investment (HBI) Tax Credit provides incentive to businesses to support jobs creation, capital investment and to improve the standard of living for Indiana residents. The non-refundable corporate income tax credits are calculated as a percentage of the eligible capital investment to support the project. The credit may be certified annually, based on the phase-in of eligible capital investment, over a period of two full calendar years from the commencement of the project.

To be eligible for the tax credit: - Project will result in net new jobs that were not previously performed by employees of the applicant - Project is economically sound and will benefit the people of Indiana by increasing opportunities for employment and strengthening the economy of Indiana - Receiving the tax credit is a major factor in the applicant’s decision to go forward with the project and not receiving the tax credit will result in the applicant not creating new jobs in Indiana - Political subdivisions/municipalities affected by the project have offered significant incentives to the business

Eligible capital investment includes new machinery and building costs associated with the project as outlined by I.C. 6-3.1-26-8.
Indiana Conservancy Act (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Landowners in a given locality may petition for the establishment of a Conservancy District. Such districts may be created for the purpose of managing and regulating flood prevention and control, drainage, irrigation, water supply for domestic and/or industrial use, the disposal of sewage and other liquid wastes, natural and recreational areas, erosion, water storage for stream flow augmentation, as well as the operation, maintenance, and improvement of projects relevant to these purposes. Section 14-33 gives procedures for the establishment, alteration, merger, and dissolution of such districts.
Indianapolis Power & Light - Small-Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Indiana) Indiana Utility Rebate Program Yes Utility Note: This program is set to expire at the end of 2014.


Indianapolis Power & Light (IP&L) offers all customers rebates for small wind and photovoltaic (PV) installations completed after June 1, 2010. PV incentives are $1.00 per watt (W), up to a maximum of $4,000 with a minimum system size requirement of 2,000 W. Interested customers should complete the rebate application and interconnection application paperwork. These rebates are offered on a first-come, first-served basis and are only available to the extent that funding is available. IP&L allocated a total of $200,000 to the program for the two year period that ends December 2013. IP&L encourages customers taking advantage of this rebate to net meter as well.
Indianapolis Power & Light - Rate REP (Renewable Energy Production) (Indiana) Indiana Performance-Based Incentive No Utility Indianapolis Power and Light Co. (IPL) purchases renewable energy through its Rate Renewable Energy Production (REP). The REP rate, commonly called a "feed-in tariff," is a payment for the production and renewable energy attributes associated with that production from renewable energy facilities. Renewable energy facilities eligible for IPL's Rate REP include solar, wind, and biomass located in IPL's territory. Biomass facilities include those that use crops grown specifically for energy production, organic waste biomass such as agricultural crops, wastes, wood and wood waste, animal waste, and aquatic plants.

In March 2012, the criteria for qualified projects was modified and approved by the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (“IURC”) which also authorized a reverse auction to be conducted in 2012 for up to 30% of the energy available under Rate REP. The total amount that IPL is authorized to purchase is 153,000 MWh per year. Facilities that take the Rate REP cannot net meter. Rate REP is a pilot rate under which no new contracts will be negotiated after March 30, 2013 unless IPL requests and the IURC approves an extension.

The deadline for applications for interconnection at the Level 3 classification (projects larger than 750 KVA, click here for more information) for more information) for renewable energy projects that intend to utilize compensation under Rate REP (Renewable Energy Production) must be submitted by August 24, 2012. Smaller Level 2 projects must apply for interconnection no later than October 1, 2012. Rate REP, by its terms, will expire on March 30, 2013. The time required to process the facilities study, negotiate an interconnection and power purchase agreement and obtain necessary IURC approvals precludes an application after August 24, 2012 from being processed prior to the expiration date of Rate REP.
Industrial Development (Indiana) Indiana Corporate Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
Yes State/Province An economically distressed county can apply for designation as a community revitalization enhancement district. Such districts must be approved by the Commission, and may receive tax incentives to aid industrial development, as described in this section.
Interconnection Standards (Indiana) Indiana Interconnection Yes State/Territory In November 2005, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) approved rules governing the interconnection of distributed generation (DG). Indiana's interconnection rules require the state's investor-owned utilities to provide three levels of interconnection to customer-generators.
  • Level 1: Applies to inverter-based systems with a maximum nameplate capacity of 10 kilowatts (kW). These systems must comply with IEEE 1547 and UL 1741 standards. There are no application fees or other fees for Level 1 interconnection review. Utilities may not impose additional requirements not specified in the IURC rules. There are specific limitations on a single system's potential impact and the aggregate potential impact on the grid under Level 1 interconnection.
  • Level 2: Applies to systems with a maximum capacity of 2 megawatts (MW). These systems also must comply with IEEE 1547 and UL 1741 standards. For Level 2 interconnection, a utility may charge fees of up to $50, plus $1 per kW of the system's nameplate capacity, plus the cost of any minor modifications to the electric distribution system or additional review. Costs for engineering work done as part of any additional review may not exceed $100 per hour. There are specific limitations on a single system's potential impact and the aggregate potential impact on the grid under Level 2 interconnection.
  • Level 3: Applies to systems that do not qualify for either Level 1 or Level 2 interconnection procedures. For Level 3 interconnection review, a utility may charge up to $100 plus $2 per kW of the system's nameplate capacity, as well as charges for actual time spent on any impact or facilities studies required by Indiana's rules. Costs for engineering work done as part of any impact or facilities study may not exceed $100 per hour.

Utilities must use an interconnection application and interconnection agreement approved by the IURC. A mutual indemnification provision and reasonable time limits on application review are included in the rules. Customer-generators must obtain "only reasonable amounts of insurance against risks for which there is a likelihood of occurrence." Customers with net-metered systems must abide by the indemnification and insurance provisions specified in the state's net metering rules. Utilities may require customers to install an external disconnect switch at the customer's expense. Any disputes between customers and utilities will be settled according to the IURC's consumer-complaint rules.

Utilities must use an IURC-approved interconnection agreement and interconnection form for each of the three levels of review. In addition, utilities must file an annual report on or before March 1 of each year. The report must specify the number, size and type of facilities interconnected as of December 31 of each year.

Qualifying facilities (QFs) and net-metered systems also must comply with the applicable requirements of Indiana's DG interconnection standards.
Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) Alabama
Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Missouri
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact is administered by the Interstate Mining Compact Commission, which does not possess regulatory powers but “provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states” and thus aids the development of effective regulatory programs and environmental protection initiatives. The Commission exercises several powers on behalf of the states, all of which are of a study, recommendatory or consultative nature. The Commission does not possess regulatory powers, as some Compacts do. The Commission provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states. It is the potential to stimulate the development and production of each state's mineral wealth through effective regulatory programs that draws many of the states together in the prosecution of the Commission's work. Given the environmental sensitivities associated with this objective, a significant portion of the Commission's work is dedicated to the environmental protection issues naturally associated with this mineral development. It is the significant value and clout that comes from "compacting" together and speaking with a strong, united voice that can make a difference in each state's efforts to implement effective regulatory programs that will conserve natural resources and secure a vibrant state (and thus national) mineral economy.
Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas
Utah
Virginia
West Virginia
Wyoming
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health, safety and the environment.

The Commission serves as the collective voice of member governors on oil and gas issues and advocates states' rights to govern petroleum resources within their borders.

The Commission formed the Geological CO2 Sequestration Task Force, which examines the technical, policy and regulatory issues related to safe and effective storage of CO2 in the subsurface (depleted oil and natural gas fields, saline formations and coal beds).

The Commission also funds research on hydraulic fracking, reusing water used in extracting oil and gas, and makes recommendations on national energy policies and statutes for individual states.

The Commission also has several associate states: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. In addition, it has international affiliations with the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon.
Labor and Safety: Mines and Mining Safety (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes State/Province This section contains labor regulations pertaining specifically to coal mine workers. The law establishes the Indiana Mining Board. The Board's duties include: collecting and distributing information concerning the nature, causes, and prevention of mine accidents and the improvements of methods, conditions, and equipment of mines with special reference to health and safety and the conservation of mineral resources and the economic conditions respecting mining and the mining industry; and promoting the technical efficiency of all persons working in and about the mines of Indiana and examine persons applying for certificates under IC 22-10-3-10. The Board reports to to the Indiana Department of Labor.
Lake Preservation (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The construction, reconstruction, recleaning, or repair of a dam, ditch, or other project is prohibited when the action is likely to lower the water level of a public freshwater lake, regulated or otherwise, that covers an area of at least 10 acres. Dredging, mining, or changing of the water level requires a permit from the Department of Natural Resources. Private ponds intended for water cooling before discharge or pollution control are not regulated under this section.
Lakes: Restrictions on Ditches and Drains (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The construction or alteration of new ditches and drains that may result in a lowering of the water level of a given lake must be accompanied by the construction of a dam to protect the water level of the lake.
Leasing of State Property (Indiana) Indiana Leasing Program
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province This legislation authorizes the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to lease public lands. State-owned land that is under the management and control of the department may be leased to a local governmental unit or a political subdivision of the state or local government. Federally-owned land that is under the control and management of the department may also be leased under this authority. DNR can also contract for the construction and operation of lodging, food, and other outdoor recreation, water resources, or service facilities that the department considers appropriate on the land.
Midwest Independent System Operator (Multiple States) Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Indiana
Kentucky
Manitoba
Interconnection Yes Non-Profit Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) is a Regional Transmission Organization, which administers wholesale electricity markets in all or parts of 11 U.S. states and the Canadian province of Manitoba. MISO administers electricity transmission grids across the Midwest and into Canada, and provides tools, transmission planning strategies, and integration for utilities in those markets. MISO is working with PJM Interconnection to develop complementing system operations and one robust, non-discriminatory wholesale electricity market to meet the needs of all customers and stakeholders in 23 states, the District of Columbia and the Canadian province of Manitoba. The market is being developed through an open stakeholder process and is being designed to serve residents regardless of whether they reside in states with bundled or unbundled retail rates.
Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States) Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Ohio
Wisconsin
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe disposal of commercial low-level radioactive waste. The Compact was enacted into law by each member state legislature during the period from 1982 through 1984, and received Congressional consent in 1985. The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact Commission is the administrative body of the Compact. It consists of one voting Commissioner from each of the six member states. Each state determines how it will appoint its Commissioner, and the state’s Governor must provide written notification to the Commission of the appointment of a Commissioner and any Alternate Commissioners.
Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Indiana Natural Resources Commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in reservoir impoundments or parts of the impoundments that are financed by the state. The water may be made available for direct withdrawal from the reservoir impoundment or released from the reservoir impoundment to create increased flowage beyond normal stream flow for use by the contracting party or purchaser at a downstream point. The withdrawals or releases may not exceed the storage allocated to water supply purposes in the authorizing legislation for water supply or multiple purpose reservoir projects.
NIPSCO - Feed-In Tariff (Indiana) Indiana Performance-Based Incentive Yes Utility NIPSCO is offering a feed-in tariff program for customers who generate electricity from solar, wind, biomass, or new hydroelectric facilities. All NIPSCO electric customers in good standing are eligible for the program. Facilities must be between 5 kilowatts (kW) and 5 megawatts (MW), must be insured, and must meet interconnection standards. Hydroelectric facilities are limited to 1 MW, and only new hydrofacilities are eligible. Payments are made to the customer on a monthly basis. Applications are available on the web site, as well as engineering standards and tariff information.


The total capacity available under the feed-in tariff is limited to 30 MW. No single technology can exceed 15 MW. 700 kW is allocated for solar projects of less than 10 kW capacity, and 300 kW is allocated for wind projects of less than 10 kW in capacity. One customer (including its affiliates) may not exceed more than 5 MW. A customer may elect to use up to 1 MW of its production for on-site use.
Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Rivers may fall under the categories of natural, scenic, or recreational. These rivers are designated, acquired, and preserved by the state, and development on or adjacent to these rivers is limited. In planning for the use and development of waters and surrounding areas, a full review and evaluation of the river as a scenic resource will be conducted, and the environmental impact of the proposed use and development will be determined. Proposed development projects must be submitted to the Department of Natural Resources for review. In addition, the Department may choose to acquire water use, scenic, and land use easements for these rivers on behalf of the state. The Department may also elect to establish a River Commission for a river designated as natural, scenic, or recreational; the commission will manage the issuance of permits relevant to that river segment. Currently, only three river segments have been designated under this program; they are described on the DNR website.
Nature Preserves (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Certain areas are established as nature preserves within the state of Indiana, and development is limited in these areas. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources keeps a registry of all nature preserves.
Navigable Waterways (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The construction of new structures in navigable waterways requires a permit from the Department of Natural Resources. Existing structures in waterways newly classified as “navigable” are not affected by this classification, unless they have been abandoned for at least 12 months. The board of county commissioners of each county may declare any stream or watercourse in the county navigable on the petition of at least twenty-four (24) freeholders of the county residing in the vicinity of the stream.
Net Metering (Indiana) Indiana Net Metering Yes State/Territory The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted rules for net metering in September 2004, requiring the state's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to offer net metering to all electric customers. The rules, which apply to renewable energy resource projects [defined by IC 8-1-37-4(a)(1) - (8)] with a maximum capacity of 1 megawatt (MW), include the following provisions:
  • A utility may limit the aggregate amount of net-metering (nameplate) capacity to 1% of its most recent summer peak load.
  • At least 40% of a utility's bet metering capacity must be residential customers.
  • An interconnection agreement between the utility and the customer must be executed before the facility may be interconnected.
  • Net-metered systems must comply with Indiana's interconnection standards (170 IAC 4-4.3).
  • Either a single meter or a dual-meter arrangement may be used.
  • Utilities may not charge customers any fees for additional metering for single-phase configurations installed by the utility, for customers' requests to net meter, or for an initial net-metering facility inspection.
  • Net metering customers must maintain homeowners, commercial, or other insurance providing coverage of at least $100,000 against loss arising out of the use of a net metered facility. Utilities may not require additional liability insurance in excess of this limit.
  • Net excess generation (NEG) is credited to the customer's next monthly bill. The rules do not address the expiration of NEG for continuous customers. (If a customer elects to cease net metering, any unused credit will revert to the utility.)
  • Any disputes between customers and utilities will be settled according to the IURC's consumer-complaint rules.

Before the IURC issued mandatory net-metering rules in September 2004, three of the state's IOUs -- Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL), Southern Indiana Gas and Electric Company (SIGECO), and PSI Energy -- voluntarily offered net metering to customers with renewable-energy systems. IOUs may choose to offer larger net metering capacity limits. For example, as of spring 2010 Indianapolis Power and Light Company voluntarily raised its net metering program capacity limits to 50 kW and made net metering available to all customer classes, as part of its demand side management programs approved by the IURC (Cause number 43623). In May 2011, the IURC approved final rules (effective July 13, 2011) increasing the maximum net metering capacity from 10 kW to 1 MW, and increasing the aggregate capacity limit from .1% to 1% of the most recent summer peak load. All electric customers are now eligible to net meter. In addition, the rulemaking defined "name plate capacity" for inverter-based net metering facilities to be "the aggregate output rating of all inverters in the facility, measured in kW." Government entities are now exempt from the indemnification provision. Lastly, the rulemaking allows all "renewable energy resources" as defined by IC 8-1-37-4(a)(1) through IC 8-1-37-4(a)(8)*.

In March 2012, the IURC issued a net metering report summarizing the net metering customers through 2011.

*In the original version of the final rules, there was a typographical error related to eligible resources. RM#09-10 LSA#10-662(ac) corrects the error, clarifying the list of eligible technologies as IC 8-1-37-4(a)(1) through IC 8-1-37-4(a)(8).
Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province NIRPC is a regional council of local governments serving the citizens of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Northwest Indiana. NIRPC provides a forum that enables the citizens of Northwest Indiana to address regional issues relating to transportation, the environment and community, and economic development. NIRPC, as a recipient of federal funds, is subject to the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, and the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

The Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC) is a multi-purpose, sub-state, area-wide planning agency. NIRPC operates as a cooperative of local governments within the Tri-County area. It is currently comprised of fifty-three members. In addition to the municipal appointments, the County Councils, Boards of Commissioners, and County Surveyors appoint one member each, as does the Governor. The Commission or the Executive Board meets monthly. NIRPC's meetings are open to the public and there is a place on every agenda for public comment.

The 2040 Comprehensive Regional Plan (CRP) is a program of the NIRPC with a vision of sustainable growth and revitalization of Lake, Porter and LaPorte Counties. The 2040 CRP includes long-term regional plans for transportation, enviroment, economic development, and land use.
Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the project, including the acquiring of property, conducting of studies, and coordinating programs and activities of other public and private agencies that are related to the Commission's objectives.
Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States) Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission representing eight states and the federal government. ORSANCO operates programs to improve water quality in the Ohio River and its tributaries, including: setting waste water discharge standards; performing biological assessments; monitoring for the chemical and physical properties of the waterways; and conducting special surveys and studies. ORSANCO also coordinates emergency response activities for spills or accidental discharges to the river, and promotes public participation in programs, such as the Ohio River Sweep and the RiverWatchers Volunteer Monitoring Program. ORSANCO sets Pollution Control Standards for industrial and municipal waste water discharges to the Ohio River, and tracks certain dischargers whose effluent can seriously impact water quality. The standards designate specific uses for the Ohio, and establish guidelines to ensure that the river is capable of supporting these uses. To keep pace with current issues, ORSANCO reviews the standards every three years. As part of the review process, workshops and public hearings are held for public input.
Oil and Gas (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and integration and forced pooling. Entities operating a well for oil and/or gas recovery must, in addition to other fees imposed by the Department, purchase bonds to demonstrate their financial commitment and provide for reclamation. More specific regulations are available on the website of the Oil and Gas Division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
PJM Interconnection (Multiple States) Delaware
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Maryland
Michigan
New Jersey
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia
District of Columbia
Interconnection Yes Non-Profit PJM (originally Pennsylvania, Jersey, Maryland) Interconnection is a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity in all or parts of Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. The PJM region has an area of 214,000 square miles, a population of about 60 million and a peak demand of 163,848 megawatts.
Pipeline Construction Guidelines (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province The Division of Pipeline Safety of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission regulates the construction of any segment of an interstate pipeline on privately owned land in Indiana. The division has provisions for establishing guidelines to be followed by pipeline owners with regards to pipeline construction and interactions with affected landowners.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Indiana) Indiana Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Indiana as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (Indiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Virginia) may be lower.
Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use, transportation, and storage of radioactive materials as well as licenses to operate or maintain facilities that manage such materials.
Redevelopment of Areas Needing Redevelopment Generally (Indiana) Indiana Enterprise Zone Yes Local Redevelopment commissions are responsible for developing plans and managing tools used to address conditions of blight (redevelopment areas) and underutilized land of economic significance (economic development areas). The work of the redevelopment commission typically involves identifying blighted areas, designating redevelopment areas, developing plans to eliminate blight and working in partnership with private developers to generate new economic development with increased tax base and new jobs.
Regional Development Authorities (Indiana) Indiana Bond Program Yes State/Province This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance projects and facilities for lease to or for the benefit of airport authority projects, commuter transportation district and other rail projects and services, regional transportation authority projects and services economic development projects, intermodal transportation projects, and regional trail or greenway projects;
Regional Water, Sewage, and Solid Waste Districts (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations
Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes State/Province In some instances, smaller communities and rural areas with wells and septic systems either may not have the ability to build the necessary infrastructure or they cannot afford the cost of providing services to maintain clean water standards. Forming a regional water, solid waste or sewer district will address concerns regarding costs and availability of services for citizens and the community, while assigning management duties to the district. Once a district is formed, it will have the responsibility for providing oversight and management of drinking water, trash removal and sanitary sewer system infrastructure. In addition, districts are eligible for low interest rate loans and grants which may not be available to private utilities. Regional water, solid waste and sewer districts are local forms of government established to address these specific concerns and manage the infrastructure of drinking water systems, sanitary sewer systems and solid waste (trash removal). Districts are established to ensure these services are available to citizens who do not have public systems, such as those with private wells and septic systems.
Regulation of Dams (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The Department has the authority to assign hazard classifications to dams, grant permits for the construction, reconstruction, or alteration of dams, and investigate existing structures.

This legislation does not apply to: - Dams built for the sole purpose of erosion control, watering livestock, recreation, or providing a haven or refuge for fish or wildlife; - Dams with a drainage area area above the dam of more than 1 square mile; - Dams more than 20 feet in height - Dams with a volume of more than one hundred (100) acre-feet of water

- Dams regulated under the federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, unless the structure is proposed to be retained as a permanent structure after bond release.
Regulation of Tall Structures (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province A permit from the Department of Transportation is required for the construction or alteration of any structure higher than 200 feet above ground level, or structures near airports, highways, roadways, private roads, railroads, and waterways, with certain measurements, as defined in this section. Permits are also required for construction in a noise sensitive area.
Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption (Indiana) Indiana Property Tax Incentive Yes State/Territory Systems that generate energy using wind, hydropower, or geothermal resources are exempt from property tax, as are solar energy heating or cooling systems*. Systems using solar power devices—including solar thermal, photovoltaic (PV), and other solar energy—are exempt from property tax only if they were installed after December 31, 2011. For most eligible renewable energy systems, the assessed value of system is exempt from property tax. One exception is solar energy heating or cooling systems, which are exempt from property tax the amount equal to the out-of-pocket expenditures for the components and labor associated with the system. The property tax exemption applies to both real property and mobile homes equipped with renewable energy systems and may only be claimed by property owners.


The property tax exemption is allowed every year that a qualifying system functions. Under H.B. 1234, renewable energy systems installed after December 31, 2014, are no longer eligible for a property tax exemption if the ownership of the property changes.


Public utilities and other electricity retailers (excluding net metered customers) may not claim a property tax exemption for wind or solar power devices.


Property owners that wish to claim this deduction must fill out Form 18865 and file it with the local county auditor. Questions about this incentive should be directed to the local auditor or assessor. Click here to find contact information for local officials. The Department of Local Government Finance outlines the incentive.


  • Solar energy heating or cooling systems include solar energy systems used for domestic hot water and space heating, including heating of swimming pools, as well as industrial pre-heating.
Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines, head race or tail race for hydro development, and electric transmission lines, to a public utility organized under Indiana law.
River Basin Commissions (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated management of the respective river basin's water and related land resources. They're charged with developing positions on major water resource issues and to serve as an advocate of the respective river basin's interests before Congress and federal, state, and local governmental agencies. Each commission has developed plans to improve water quality in the basin. Each commission has specific goals and charges, which can be reviewed on their respective websites and in the legislative chapter for each commission.
Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Equipment (Indiana) Indiana Sales Tax Incentive Yes State/Territory In Indiana, transactions involving manufacturing machinery, tools, and equipment are exempt from the state gross retail tax if the property is used for the production of tangible personal property, which includes electricity. Therefore, equipment, machinery, and tools used in the production of renewable electricity may also be eligible for this exemption.


In 2009, the Indiana Department of Revenue (DOR) issued a ruling specifically for wind turbines, clarifying that the foundation, tower, nacelle, gearbox, generator, yaw motors, blades and related component parts are all exempt from the state sales and use tax. However, the DOR ruled that that any "property which consists of or becomes part of a transformer in an electrical interconnection system for a wind turbine" are taxable.


The DOR has not ruled on the specific components of other renewable energy systems.
Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana) Indiana Industry Recruitment/Support
Siting and Permitting
Training/Technical Assistance
Workforce development
Yes State/Province The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties. Each District is governed by boards comprised of local supervisors, who coordinate conservation on the ground with landowners in each county. The Association represents the interests of local Districts as one voice, and assists their leadership through coordination and education for the management of Indiana's natural resources.
Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting, construction, reporting, and transportation practices and fees are discussed in these statutes. Counties are required to establish individual Solid Waste Management Districts or partner with other counties to create such districts, which are authorized to develop solid waste management plans and to plan, design, construct, finance, manage, own, lease, operate, and maintain facilities for solid waste management. Applicants for permits to construct new solid waste disposal or processing facilities must demonstrate the need for such a facility. Active regulations of the Solid Waste Management Board can be found in Title 329 of the Indiana Administrative Code, while pending regulations can be found on the Board's website.
Special Improvement Districts for Redevelopment of Blighted Areas (Indiana) Indiana Bond Program
Enterprise Zone
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province Local redevelopment commissions may designate special improvement districts to aid local public improvements and provide special benefits to district property owners.
State Environmental Protection Hierarchy (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This chapter recognizes two categories of approaches to environmental protection: clean manufacturing, which consists of reducing, avoiding, or eliminating harmful environmental impacts and pollutants; and waste management, which addresses harmful discharges, wastes, and emissions. The preferred approach of the Indiana legislature is clean manufacturing, followed by sustainable waste management practices.
Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Indiana Department of Natural Resources implements and enforces the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, as well as a statewide program to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of mining operations, and regulates coal mining operations to protect the environment, the rights of surface landowners, and to assure that reclamation is feasible. This legislation authorizing DNR contains information about exploration activities, coal mining permits, operations, and reclamation requirements.
Utility Easements (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province A permit is required from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources for the construction of a utility upon a state park, a state forest, a state game preserve, land acquired by the state and set aside as a scenic or historic place, or the portion of a public highway passing through one of the aforementioned types of places.
Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Indiana Industry Recruitment/Support
Performance-Based Incentive
Corporate Tax Incentive
Grant Program
Rebate Program
Yes State/Province This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal gasification. The statute also supports the development of projects using renewable energy sources as well as projects that may enhance the safe and reliable use of nuclear energy production or generating technologies.
Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes State/Province This statute requires a certificate of necessity from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission for the construction, purchase, or lease of an electricity generation facility by a public utility.
Utility Regulation (Indiana) Indiana Generating Facility Rate-Making Yes State/Province The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control any equipment for the production, transmission, delivery, or furnishing of heat, light, water, or power; or collection, treatment, purification, and disposal in a sanitary manner of liquid and solid waste, sewage, night soil, and industrial waste. The law contains provisions regarding facility operation, service rates and charges, property valuation, meters and measuring appliances, and investigations. In addition, these regulations contain sections specific to clean coal technology and natural gas.
Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Indiana Siting and Permitting Yes Local The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where development is limited. The Wabash River Heritage Corridor Commission is responsible for promoting conservation and managing development in this area.
Water Pollution Control (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Water Pollution Control Board are tasked with the prevention of pollution in the waters of the state. The Board may adopt rules and regulations governing the release of potentially harmful substances into state waters. This statute contains additional provisions regarding the release of hazardous materials, livestock manure management and wastewater management practices, groundwater protection, permitting for coal mine operations, and state regulated wetlands. Active regulations can be found in Titles 327 and 330 of the Indiana Administrative Code, while pending regulations can be found on the Water Pollution Control Board's website.
Water Resource Management (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Water may be used in reasonable amounts for beneficial purposes, which are defined by the state of Indiana to include power generation and energy conversion. This section describes other regulations pertaining to stream minimum flow standards and significant water withdrawal facilities.
Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas and limit groundwater withdrawals by existing users in those areas, thus making groundwater use greater than 100,000 gallons per day subject to permitting requirements.
Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by the entity for the entity's purpose may use the increased flowage at all times. Any entity may be required to report the volume of water used. Diversion of water out of the Great Lakes Basin is subject to permitting regulations, and may not occur except under the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact.
Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin) Wisconsin Siting and Permitting Yes Local Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water use permits exist: a general permit is required for withdrawals that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period but do not equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. An individual permit is required for withdrawals that equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. There are no permit application fees.
Waterway Management Districts (Indiana) Indiana Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Waterway management districts are established to manage and supervise the use and development of waterways in municipalities with populations between 29,600 and 29,900.