Illinois/EZ Policies

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EZ Policies for Illinois

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Policy Place Policy Type Active Implementing Sector Summary
Administrative Code Title 83, Public Utilities (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations
Generating Facility Rate-Making
Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Training/Technical Assistance
Yes State/Province In addition to general rules for utilities, this article states regulations for the protection of underground utilities, promotional practices of electric and gas public utilities construction of electric power and communication lines, standards of service and environmental disclosure. It also states RPS and clean coal standard for alternative retail electric suppliers and utilities operating outside their service areas. It states regulations on net metering, electric interconnection of facilities, standards of service for gas utilities, training programs for natural gas system operating personnel, safety and quality standards for gas transportation and standards of service for water utilities.
Air Pollution (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.
Atomic Radiation (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes State/Province This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.
Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program (Illinois) Illinois State Grant Program Yes State/Territory Note: The program is accepting applications until 5:00 pm on December 1, 2014.

The Renewable Energy Resources Program (RERP) promotes the development of renewable energy in Illinois. This program is funded by the Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund (RERTF)-- the state's public benefits fund -- and is administered by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO), with assistance from the Energy Resources Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The focus of the Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program, through the RERP, is to demonstrate the use of biogas and biomass for on-site energy generation at facilities in Illinois. Projects designed to use biogas or biomass as a source of fuel to produce electricity with combined heat and power (CHP) through gasification, co-firing or anaerobic digestion technologies are being targeted. The biogas and biomass grant program will provide a 50% cost-share for energy feasibility studies or for the installation of equipment for these purposes. The maximum grants available for feasibility studies, biogas projects, and biomass projects are $2,500, $225,000, and $500,000, respectively. All projects must be located in Illinois within the service areas of utilities that contribute to the RERTF (through a Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge). Applications are available on the program web site.
Carbon Dioxide Transportation and Sequestration Act (Illinois) Illinois Equipment Certification
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes State/Province This Act applies to the application process for the issuance of a certificate of authority by an owner or operator of a pipeline designed, constructed, and operated to transport and to sequester carbon dioxide produced by a clean coal facility, by a clean coal substitute natural gas (SNG) facility, or by any other source that will result in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from that source. No person or entity may construct, operate, or repair a carbon dioxide pipeline unless the person or entity possesses a certificate of authority. Inasmuch as the regulation of the construction, maintenance, and operation of pipelines transporting carbon dioxide, whether interstate or intrastate, falls within the statutory and regulatory jurisdiction of the Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration of the federal Department of Transportation, each carbon dioxide pipeline owner shall construct, maintain, and operate all of its pipelines, related facilities, and equipment in this State in a manner that complies fully with all federal laws and regulations governing the construction, maintenance, and operation of pipelines transporting carbon dioxide, as from time to time amended, and which otherwise poses no undue risk to its employees or the public.
City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program (Illinois) Illinois Utility Rebate Program Yes Utility City Water, Light and Power (CWLP) is offering residential and commercial customers a $1,500 per kilowatt (kW) rebate for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems with a maximum rebate of up to $7,500 per household and $15,000 per business. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per customer account. In order to obtain an application, contact the CWLP Energy Services Office directly using the email or phone number below. Applicants must have CWLP metered electric service and must obtain pre-approval from the CWLP before purchasing equipment. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis, until the program funds are exhausted.SOLAR REWARDS Application Packet
City of Chicago - Green Permit Program (Illinois) Illinois Green Building Incentive Yes Local The City of Chicago encourages building design, construction and renovation in a manner that provides healthier environments, reduces operating costs and conserves energy and resources through their Green Permit Program. The Chicago Department of Buildings (DOB) Green Permit Program provides developers and owners with an incentive to build green by streamlining the permit process timeline for projects which are designed to maximize indoor air quality and conserve energy and resources.

Green Permit Program Incentives

Projects accepted into the Green Permit Program can receive permits in less than 30 business days or in as little as 15 business days. The number of green building elements included in the project plans and project complexity determines the length of the timeline. In addition, projects which meet the most stringent sustainability guidelines may also qualify for a partial waiver of consultant code review fees, up to $25,000.

Application Procedure
Interested applicants must involve DOB early in the design process. DOB will help to guide the applicant through the process to ensure the shortest permitting process time.

Acceptance into the Green Permit Program is based on a series of requirements that qualifies the project for one of two different Benefit Tiers of green building certification:


  • Commercial projects must earn certification within the appropriate Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council.
  • Smaller residential projects must earn a two-star or greater rating under the Chicago Green Homes program.
Both commercial and small residential projects are also required to earn from one to three menu items, or additional green design strategies above and beyond certification prerequisites, in order to be eligible for permitting privileges.
City of Chicago - Green Power Purchasing (Illinois) Illinois Green Power Purchasing Yes Local In June 2001, the City of Chicago signed an agreement with Commonwealth Edison and the Environmental Resources Trust to purchase 20% of its electricity from clean, renewable resources by the end of 2005. The city reached this goal in 2008, the city with a purchase of 215 million kWh of wind and biomass energy from MidAmerican Energy. The city's plan is to maintain that 20% level for the foreseeable future. As of October 2011, the City was purchasing 20% of their power from renewables. For more green power purchasing program listings, visit the U.S. Department of Energy Green Power Network.
City of Chicago - Small Business Improvement Fund (Illinois) Illinois Local Grant Program Yes Local SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund for the City of Chicago. The fund utilizes revenue from Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and supports commercial and industrial properties, as well as tenants, within specific TIF districts to upgrade their facilities. Certain energy efficient upgrades, such as energy efficient windows, HVAC systems, and roofs may qualify for funding under this program and are encouraged.

The grants can cover up to 75% of the costs of the upgrades and are paid after the work is completed and expenses paid-up.


Commercial applicants are eligible if they have a maximum of $5 million in gross sales for each of the past three years. New commercial businesses must use projected sales. Industrial applicants may not employ more than 100 full-time equivalent employees. Landlord applicants may not have more than a net worth of $6 million, with total liquidity of no more than $500,000. Tenant applicants may not have more than $5 million in gross sales, and must have a leasehold interest in the property with at least 3 years remaining on the lease term. Additional eligibility requirements applicable, interested parties should contact SomerCor 504 Inc for additional details.
Climate Action Plan (Illinois) Illinois Climate Policies No State/Province In 2006 Governor Blagojevich announced a new global warming initiative that will build on Illinois’ role as a national leader in protecting the environment and public health. The announcement marked the beginning of a long-term strategy by the state to combat global climate change, and builds on the steps the state has already taken to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, such as enhancing the use of wind power, biofuels and energy efficiency. The Climate Change Advisory group issued a series of recommended strategies in 2007.
Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation (Illinois) Illinois Property Tax Incentive Yes State/Territory Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure (tower plus generation equipment) as "real property", subject to taxation, while others deemed only the tower portion as taxable property. This difference in valuation procedure meant that the taxable value of identical wind turbines could vary by as much as 75% from county to county, creating dramatically different tax loads and complicating projects that cross county lines.

In October 2007 Illinois passed Public Act 095-0644, a law providing consistent valuation procedures for commercial wind farm equipment (amended via HB4797 in 2010). For ten years, beginning in the 2007 assessment year, wind energy devices larger than 500 kilowatts (kW) and producing power for commercial sale will be valued at $360,000/Megawatt (MW) of capacity, annually adjusted for inflation according to the U.S. Consumer Price Index. This figure is termed the trended real property cost basis. Because Illinois assesses property for property tax purposes at 1/3 of its fair cash value, in practice the assessed value of commercial wind energy property is $119,988/MW.

The law also defines an allowance for physical depreciation of the device, calculated by dividing the age of the turbine by 25 and then multiplying the result by the trended real property cost basis. The physical depreciation allowance may not exceed 70% of the trended real property cost basis, though additional depreciation allowances may be granted for functional or external obsolescence.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Community Development Fund (Illinois) Illinois Loan Program Yes State/Province The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available to start-up companies and existing small businesses.
Community Service Block Grant Loan Program (Illinois) Illinois Loan Program Yes State/Province Community Service Block Grant Loan Program is a partnership among the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, community action agencies, and the Illinois Ventures for Community Action. The program provides long-term, low-interest, fixed-rate loans to new or expanding businesses. Companies must create jobs for low-income individuals.
Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program (Illinois) Illinois Corporate Tax Incentive Yes State/Province The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program encourages companies to remain, expand, or locate in Illinois. The program provides tax credits to qualifying companies equal to the amount of state income taxes withheld from salaries for newly created jobs. A company must make a capital investment of $5 million and create a minimum of 25 jobs to be eligible. A company must also demonstrate that it had considered locating out-of-state.
Enterprise Zone Program (Illinois) Illinois Corporate Tax Incentive Yes State/Province The Enterprise Zone Program provides eligible businesses that relocate or expand to a designated zone with tax incentives such as: 1) an investment tax credit; 2) a job tax credit for each job created in the zone; and 3) an exemption on the state utility tax.
Environmental Protection Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This Act states general provisions for the protection of the environment. It also states specific regulations for air, water and land pollution as well as atomic radiation, toxic chemical and oil spill reporting; along with penalties and permit requirements for several processes. No person shall cause or threaten or allow the discharge or emission of any contaminant into the environment or construct, install, or operate any equipment, facility, vehicle, vessel, or aircraft capable of causing or contributing to air pollution or designed to prevent air pollution, of any type designated by Board regulations without a permit granted by the Agency unless otherwise exempt by this Act or Board regulations. Emission standards and penalties for violations are also stated. Under the water pollution chapter, the act states prohibited actions such as discharging pollutants in water bodies or installing equipment that may cause water pollution. Under land pollution, no person shall cause or allow the open dumping of any waste or abandon, dump, or deposit any waste upon the public highways or other public property, except in a sanitary landfill approved by the Agency pursuant to regulations adopted by the Board. Under atomic radiation, the article states that at least 60 days before beginning the decommissioning of any nuclear power plant located in this State, the owner or operator of the plant shall file, for information purposes only, a copy of the decommissioning plan for the plant with the Agency and a copy with the Illinois Emergency Management Agency. Any person, corporation or public authority intending to construct a nuclear steam-generating facility or a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant shall file with the Illinois Emergency Management Agency an environmental feasibility report which incorporates the data provided in the preliminary safety analysis required to be filed with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Forestry Policies (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province Illinois' Forests are managed by the State Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forest Resources. The Department issued in 2008 its "Statewide Forest Resource Assessments and Strategies" document:

http://www.stateforesters.org/files/IL-Assess-Strategy-20100528.pdf

The Illinois Forestry Development Act (IFDA) offers financial incentive for implementing forest management practices that would protect and enhance forest resources. It provides the funding source for a forest landowner cost-share program. This program is funded through the collection of a four (4) percent harvest fee on all timber sales. These funds are only available for the cost-share program and the operations of the Illinois Legislature's Council on forestry Development:

http://dnr.state.il.us/conservation/forestry/IFDA/

The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity's Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program was created to encourage the use of biomass and biogas in the state:

http://www.illinois.gov/dceo/whyillinois/KeyIndustries/Energy/Pages/02-BiogasBioMass.aspx
Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure (Illinois) Illinois Generation Disclosure Yes State/Territory As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative retail electric suppliers must provide details of their fuel mix and emissions to customers within bills on a quarterly basis. This information is also posted to the Illinois Commerce Commission's web site.
Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate distribution to the public in the State of Illinois, if the said business of such corporation is regulated or subject to regulation under either the laws of the State of Illinois or the laws of the United States, shall have the right to enter upon, take or damage private property or any interest therein, in the manner provided for by the law of eminent domain, necessary or convenient for its said operations, including the storage of gas, all of which operations are hereby recognized and declared to be affected with a public interest and all of the property used in which operations is hereby recognized and declared to be devoted to public use. 
Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state) Illinois
Indiana
Minnesota
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Ontario
Quebec
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council, which is responsible for water conservation and efficiency programs and reviewing proposed projects. Projects which may lead to new or increased water diversions are limited; exceptions are described in this statute. More information can be found on the website of the Council: http://www.glslcompactcouncil.org/
Green Energy Loans (Illinois) Illinois State Loan Program Yes State/Territory Note: The Green Energy Loans Program does not currently have information available online, however, the program is still active and accepting applications.


Illinois business owners, non-profit organizations, and local governments seeking loans for certain energy efficiency and renewable energy upgrades may apply for a rate reduction, under the Green Energy Loan program through the Illinois State Treasurer's Office, in partnership with eligible banks in the state (loan seekers are encouraged to verify if the eligible banks are actively participating in the program). Loan amounts are up to $10 million.

To qualify, the project must be located in Illinois and meet one of the following four criteria:

1. Participation in a state or utility administered efficiency program (ComEd, Ameren, or Dept of Commerce and Economic Opportunity); or

2. Have a contract with an Energy Service Company (commonly referred to as ESCO); or

3. Have a LEED Certified Professional working on the project with the intent to pursue LEED Certification; or

4. Have a plan to install renewable energy system.

The first step is to apply for and receive a loan from a participating, eligible bank for a comprehensive energy efficiency project and/or renewable energy system. After receiving approval, the participating lending bank applies for the rate reduction from the Illinois State Treasurer's Office, using the Green Energy Loan application. If approved, the Treasurer's Office will then deposit state fund in the bank, and the bank will pass along the rate reduction. The actual rate reduction varies depending on the bank. Interest rates are updated daily on the Treasurer's web site.
High Impact Business Program (Illinois) Illinois Corporate Tax Incentive
Sales Tax Incentive
Yes State/Province
The High Impact Business Program provides tax incentives to encourage large-scale economic development. Businesses may qualify for: investment tax credits, a state sales tax exemption on building materials, an exemption from state sales tax on utilities, a state sales tax exemption on purchases of personal property used or consumed in the manufacturing process or in the operation of a pollution control facility. The project must involve a minimum of $12 million investment causing the creation of 500 full-time jobs or an investment of $30 million causing the retention of 1500 full-time jobs. The investment must take place at a designated location in Illinois outside of an Enterprise Zone.</br>
In 2009, the program was expanded to include wind energy facilities. The designation as a Wind Energy/High Impact Business is contingent on the business constructing a new electric generation facility or expanding an existing wind power facility. “New wind power facility” means a newly constructed electric generation facility, or a newly constructed expansion of an existing electric generation facility, placed in service on or after July 1, 2009, that generates electricity using wind energy devices. “New wind energy device” means any device, with a nameplate capacity of at least 0.5 megawatts, that is used in the process of converting kinetic energy from the wind to generate electricity.</br>
Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation Grants (Illinois) Illinois Non-Profit Grant Program Yes Non-Profit The Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation (ICECF) was established in December 1999 as an independent foundation with a $225 million endowment provided by Commonwealth Edison. The ICECF invests in clean-energy development and land-preservation efforts, working with communities and citizens to improve environmental quality in Illinois. The ICECF provides competitive grants to programs and projects that improve energy efficiency, develop renewable-energy resources, and preserve and enhance natural areas and wildlife habitats in Illinois. Since 2001 the Foundation has awarded approximately 3,600 grants totaling $212 million.

Grants support both energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, like wind, solar (both solar thermal and solar electric applications), biomass, fuel cells and other forms of distributed generation. Award amounts will be considered on a case-by-case basis, taking into account cost-effectiveness of the project, project innovation, simple project payback, other sources of funding and owner contribution. Visit the ICECF grant application website to find out about currently available and upcoming grants.

Application Process Grant cycles and application deadlines vary depending on the project. Beginning in June 2011, ICECF uses an online application process. The ICECF will notify all applicants whether to submit a full proposal. When applicants are invited to submit a full proposal, the ICECF will specify what information to include, as well as the supporting documents that must be submitted.

Illinois Solar Schools Program

The ICECF also administers the Solar Schools Program (in addition to the K-12 Wind Schools Program). These programs are targeted grant programs with separate guidelines, deadlines, and application forms. Since 2006, ICECF has awarded over $2,100,000 in grants to over 220 schools to support the installation of 1-kW solar PV systems. ICECF has developed a dedicated website for this program: http://www.illinoissolarschools.org/
Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) Illinois Grant Program Yes State/Province The Illinois Coal Development Program seeks to advance promising clean coal technologies beyond research and towards commercialization. The program provides a 50/50 match with private industry dollars to support market-driven needs of the industry.
Illinois Coal Revival Program (Illinois) Illinois Grant Program Yes State/Province The Illinois Coal Revival Program is a grants program providing partial funding to assist with the development of new, coal-fueled electric generation capacity and coal gasification or IGCC units that generate chemical feedstocks or transportation fuels derived from Illinois coal.
Illinois Gas Pipeline Safety Act (Illinois) Illinois Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes State/Province Standards established under this Act may apply to the design, installation, inspection, testing, construction, extension, operation, replacement, and maintenance of pipeline facilities. Whenever the Commission finds a particular facility to be hazardous to life or property, it may require the person operating such facility to take the steps necessary to remove the hazard. Each person who engages in the transportation of gas or who owns or operates pipeline facilities shall file with the Commission a plan for inspection and maintenance of each pipeline facility owned or operated by such person as well as any changes in such plan, in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Commission. The Commission may, by regulation, also require such person to file the plans for approval.
Illinois Solar Energy Association - Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program (Illinois) Illinois Performance-Based Incentive Yes Non-Profit RECAP is not currently accepting applications. The most recent solicitation closed April 30th, 2013. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations.

The Illinois Solar Energy Association offers the Renewable Energy Credit Aggregation Program (RECAP) to Illinois solar photovoltaic (PV) system owners, providing them with an opportunity to receive payment for their solar renewable energy credits (SRECs*). The program was created in 2008 to provide an additional revenue stream for small PV system owners and to support Illinois solar development.

RECAP is a partnership with Community Energy, Inc (CEI). The SRECs are used to supply the solar portion the City of Naperville Renewable Energy Program. This partnership is the first market example of SREC transactions within Illinois. Production incentives are limited to solar photovoltaics. To be eligible for RECAP, solar PV systems must be located in Illinois, be legally grid connected. In addition, production must be tracked on a monthly or quarterly basis. Participants must be members of the Illinois Solar Energy Association, either as regular members for residential accounts, or business members for commercial accounts. They can join online at www.illinoissolar.org.

RECAP is an annual program and requires a yearly application. Applications are accepted on a first come, first-served basis. Applicants will be notified of how much (if any) of their SRECs will be purchased via the formal application process.


Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have two outputs – electricity and solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs). For every 1000 kWh (1 MWh) of solar electricity generated, one SREC is issued. SRECs are tradeable, non-tangible pollution abatement rights.
Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes Local  It is the purpose of this Act to reduce reliance on land disposal of solid waste, to encourage and promote alternative means of managing solid waste, and to assist local governments with solid waste planning and management. In furtherance of those aims, while recognizing that landfills will continue to be necessary, this Act establishes the following waste management hierarchy, in descending order of preference, as State policy: volume reduction at the source; recycling and reuse; combustion with energy recovery; combustion for volume reduction; disposal in landfill facilities.
Interconnection Standards (Illinois) Illinois Interconnection Yes State/Territory In August 2007, Illinois enacted legislation (S.B. 680) requiring the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) to establish standards for net metering and interconnection for renewable energy systems by April 1, 2008. Although S.B. 680 only requires the promulgation of interconnection standards for "eligible renewable generating equipment," the ICC chose to take this opportunity to develop standards for all distributed generation up to 10 megawatts (MW). Final interconnection standards were adopted by the ICC in August 2008. In March 2010, the ICC established interconnection standards for Large Distributed Generation Facilities, or those over 10 MW.

Interconnection of Distributed Generation Facilities (up to 10 MW)

The interconnection rules set four levels of review for interconnection requests. A project must meet all of the requirements of a given classification in order to be eligible for that level of expedited review. The level of review required is generally based on system capacity, whether system components are certified by a nationally recognized testing laboratory (NRTL), and whether the system is connected to a radial distribution circuit or to an area network. The basic definitions* for each tier are as follows:

  • Tier 1: Certified, inverter-based systems with a capacity rating of 10 kilowatts (kW) or less.
  • Tier 2: Certified systems with a capacity rating of 2 MW or less, connected to a radial distribution network or a spot network serving one customer.
  • Tier 3: Certified systems with a capacity rating of 50 kW or less connected to an area network and from which power will not be exported; or certified, non-power-exporting systems with a capacity rating of 10 MW or less connected to a radial distribution network.
  • Tier 4: Systems with a capacity of 10 MW or less that do not meet the criteria for inclusion in a lower tier, including all systems using non-certified components and those that require additional construction by the utility in order accommodate the facility.

The ICC adopted IEEE 1547 as the technical standard of evaluation in July 2007. Systems are considered to be lab-certified if the components have been evaluated as compliant with UL 1741 and the 2008 National Electric Code (NEC) according to the testing protocols of IEEE 1547. The rules also specify the technical screens which may be applied to applications at each level of review as well as time limits for different stages of the evaluation process. Generally speaking, higher level applications are subject to more intensive screening and longer time limits.

All systems are required to have an external disconnect switch directly accessible to the utility. Facilities larger than 1 MW must carry liability insurance with coverage of at least $2 million per occurrence and $4 million in aggregate. Standardized interconnection agreements are available for all four tiers. The Tier 1 agreement is a simplified version of that used for projects requiring higher levels of review.

Interconnection of Large Distributed Generation Facilities (10 MW or larger)

The ICC adopted a separate set of rules applicable to distributed generation facilities over 10 Megawatts, which are not covered under the above interconnection standards. These rules provide a standard set of procedures covering the interconnection process as well as standard agreements. It should be noted that interconnections covered by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, or PJM Interconnection are not subject to these new rules. See ICC Docket 08-0481 for more information.

* The definitions here cover several important classification criteria; however, interested parties should consult the actual rule for more precise definitions and additional restrictions.
Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) Alabama
Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Missouri
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Yes State/Province The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact is administered by the Interstate Mining Compact Commission, which does not possess regulatory powers but “provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states” and thus aids the development of effective regulatory programs and environmental protection initiatives. The Commission exercises several powers on behalf of the states, all of which are of a study, recommendatory or consultative nature. The Commission does not possess regulatory powers, as some Compacts do. The Commission provides a forum for interstate action and communication on issues of concern to the member states. It is the potential to stimulate the development and production of each state's mineral wealth through effective regulatory programs that draws many of the states together in the prosecution of the Commission's work. Given the environmental sensitivities associated with this objective, a significant portion of the Commission's work is dedicated to the environmental protection issues naturally associated with this mineral development. It is the significant value and clout that comes from "compacting" together and speaking with a strong, united voice that can make a difference in each state's efforts to implement effective regulatory programs that will conserve natural resources and secure a vibrant state (and thus national) mineral economy.
Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas
Utah
Virginia
West Virginia
Wyoming
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health, safety and the environment.

The Commission serves as the collective voice of member governors on oil and gas issues and advocates states' rights to govern petroleum resources within their borders.

The Commission formed the Geological CO2 Sequestration Task Force, which examines the technical, policy and regulatory issues related to safe and effective storage of CO2 in the subsurface (depleted oil and natural gas fields, saline formations and coal beds).

The Commission also funds research on hydraulic fracking, reusing water used in extracting oil and gas, and makes recommendations on national energy policies and statutes for individual states.

The Commission also has several associate states: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. In addition, it has international affiliations with the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon.
Kyoto Protocol Act of 1998 (Illinois) Illinois Climate Policies
Environmental Regulations
Yes State/Province Effective immediately, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and the Pollution Control Board shall not propose or adopt any new rule for the intended purpose of addressing the adverse effects of climate change which in whole or in part reduces emissions of greenhouse gases, as those gases are defined by the Kyoto Protocol, from the residential, commercial, industrial, electric utility, or transportation sectors. In the absence of an Act of the General Assembly approving such rules, the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency shall not submit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or to any other agency of the federal government any legally enforceable commitments related to the reduction of greenhouse gases, as those gases are defined by the Kyoto Protocol. 
Large Business Development Program (Illinois) Illinois Grant Program Yes State/Province The Large Business Development Program, administered by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, provides grants to large businesses for bondable business activities, including the purchase of fixed assets. Business should be undertaking a major expansion or relocation project. Grant amounts are based on the amount of investment and job creation or retention involved.
Local Option - Contractual Assessments for Renewable Energy and/or Energy Efficiency (Illinois) Illinois PACE Financing Yes State/Territory Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a statement in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided.

Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Illinois has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Illinois offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)

Illinois has authorized municipalities -- cities, villages and incorporated towns -- and counties to enter into voluntary agreements with property owners to provide for contractual assessments. These assessments will provide financing to the property owner to install renewable energy technologies or energy efficiency upgrades that are permanently fixed to the property. The property owner then repays the assessments via his/her property taxes.

As of July 2013, no municipalities in Illinois offer PACE programs.
Local Solid Waste Disposal Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes Local It is the purpose of this Act and the policy of this State to protect the public health and welfare and the quality of the environment by providing local governments with the ability to properly dispose of solid waste within their jurisdictions by preparing and implementing, either individually or jointly, solid waste management plans for the disposal of solid waste and, to the extent technically and economically feasible, to efficiently use products or by-products generated during the disposal process.
Midwest Independent System Operator (Multiple States) Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Indiana
Kentucky
Manitoba
Interconnection Yes Non-Profit Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) is a Regional Transmission Organization, which administers wholesale electricity markets in all or parts of 11 U.S. states and the Canadian province of Manitoba. MISO administers electricity transmission grids across the Midwest and into Canada, and provides tools, transmission planning strategies, and integration for utilities in those markets. MISO is working with PJM Interconnection to develop complementing system operations and one robust, non-discriminatory wholesale electricity market to meet the needs of all customers and stakeholders in 23 states, the District of Columbia and the Canadian province of Manitoba. The market is being developed through an open stakeholder process and is being designed to serve residents regardless of whether they reside in states with bundled or unbundled retail rates.
Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States) Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Montana
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin
Manitoba
Green Power Purchasing Yes Non-Profit The Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS®) tracks renewable energy generation in participating States and Provinces and assists in verifying compliance with individual state/provincial or voluntary Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) and objectives. M-RETS® is a tool to keep track of all relevant information about renewable energy produced and delivered in the region. Currently, several States and Provinces participate in M-RETS®: Illinois, Iowa, Manitoba, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin have policies in place requiring or strongly encouraging utility development of renewable resources. M-RETS® uses verifiable production data for all participating generators and creates a Renewable Energy Credit (REC) in the form of a tradable digital certificate for each MWh.
Net Metering (Illinois) Illinois Net Metering Yes State/Territory NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and 2012 (S.B. 1652, H.B. 3036, and S.B. 3811) has changed several aspects of net metering in Illinois. For customers in competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, the law prescribes a dual metering and bill crediting system which does not meet the definition of net metering as the term is generally defined. Click here for information regarding competitive classes, and here for information regarding competitive classes, and here to find utility switching statistics. The law also increases the system capacity limit to 2 MW and the aggregate capacity limit to 5%. Additionally, agricultural residues, untreated and unadulterated wood waste, landscape trimmings, and livestock manure are added to the list of eligible resources. More information will be posted here once the ICC develops new rules.

Illinois enacted legislation in August 2007 (S.B. 680) requiring investor-owned utilities in Illinois to begin offering net metering by April 1, 2008. In May 2008, the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) adopted final rules for net metering, effective May 15, 2008. While Illinois's investor-owned utilities and alternative retail electricity suppliers must offer net metering, the state's municipal utilities and electric cooperatives are not required to do so.

In Illinois, net metering is available to electric customers that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, dedicated energy crops, anaerobic digestion of livestock or food processing waste, hydropower, and fuel cells and microturbines powered by renewable fuels. Systems up to 40 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that are intended primarily to offset the customer's own electrical requirements are eligible.*

Each investor-owned utility and retail supplier must provide net metering and dual metering until the load of its net-metering customers and dual-metering customers equals 1% of the total peak demand supplied by the utility during the previous year. For residential customers, net metering is "typically" accomplished through use of a single, bi-directional meter. For non-residential customers, net metering is "typically" accomplished through the use of a dual meter. Dual metering is required for non-residential customers with systems greater than 40 kW but not greater than two megawatts (MW). The utility must provide the necessary metering equipment for systems up to 40 kW in capacity, while customers with systems greater than 40 kW but less than 2 MW must pay for the costs of installing necessary metering equipment. (Net metering and dual metering are not available to systems greater than 2 MW.) An electricity provider may choose to allow meter aggregation for community-owned wind, biomass, solar, or methane digesters, or other situations where multiple individual customers are served by the same renewable generating facility (such as an apartment building).

S.B. 1652 added a provision that requires all net-metered systems to be installed by a certified contractor. In March 2012, the ICC opened a docket (Case No. 12-0213) to determine the specific certification requirements

Net Excess Generation and Renewable Energy Credits For systems up to 40 kW in capacity, any net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried over as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit to the following billing period. At the end of an annualized period, any remaining NEG credits in the customer's account expire. Customers may select an annualized period that ends with last day of either their April or October billing period for this purpose.

For customers taking service under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff, any monthly consumption of electricity is calculated according to the terms of the contract or tariff to which the same customer would be assigned to or be eligible for if the customer was not a net-metering customer. When net-metering customers under TOU tariffs are net generators during any discrete TOU period, the net kilowatt-hours (kWh) produced are valued at the same price per kWh as the utility would charge for retail kWh sales during that same time of use period.

Credits for NEG may be used to offset other charges assessed by the electricity provider. In addition, all net-metering customers (and dual-metering customers) hold ownership and title to all renewable-energy credits (RECs) and greenhouse-gas credits associated with customer generation.

*Illinois allows dual metering for systems greater than 40 kW but not greater than 2 MW, although the customer must pay for the metering equipment, and non-residential customers must pay for "all taxes, fees and utility delivery charges" for the gross amount of electricity delivered by the utility. As an economic incentive, dual metering is generally less favorable to customers than net metering.
New Market Tax Credit (Illinois) Illinois Personal Tax Incentives
Corporate Tax Incentive
Equity Investment
Yes State/Province The Illinois New Markets Development Program provides supplemental funding for investment entities that have been approved for the Federal New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program. This program will support small and developing businesses by making capital funds more easily available and will make Illinois more attractive to possible investors. The NMTC program provides state and federal tax credits to investors that make investments into approved funds, which will make investments in eligible projects located in low income census tracks throughout Illinois. The program provides non-refundable tax credits to investors in qualifying Community Development Entities (CDE’s) worth 39% of the equity investment made into the CDE over a 7 year credit allowance period.
North American Renewables Registry (Multiple States) North Carolina
Kansas
Illinois
Missouri
Puerto Rico
Green Power Purchasing Yes Non-Profit The North American Renewables Registry (NAR) provides a Web-based platform trusted to create, track, and manage renewable energy certificate (REC) origination for clean generation facilities and states not covered by one of the existing APX-powered, regional systems. All market participants are able to take advantage of a trusted infrastructure to help manage their role in the market. With the ability to create unique, serialized records for every REC, the Registry provides product transparency, accountability and protection against double counting. The system has been designated as the compliance system for the Missouri Renewable Energy Standard (RES). The State of North Carolina has also designated NAR as an eligible registry for facilities located outside of North Carolina that seek to qualify for the North Carolina's Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard. Recently, the Kansas Corporation Commission decided to use NAR to verify RECs purchased by Kansas utilities and cooperatives for compliance with the Kansas Renewable Portfolio Standard. With this addition, renewable energy facilities registered in NAR can now be tagged as eligible for Kansas, Illinois, Missouri and Puerto Rico if they have met the applicable requirements as a renewable facility. Furthermore, NAR is currently able to export certificates to North Carolina Renewable Energy Tracking System (NC RETS) and accept imports of certificates from Western Renewable Energy Generation Information System (WREGIS), Michigan Renewable Energy Certification System (MIRECS), Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS) and NC RETS.
Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States) Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia
Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission representing eight states and the federal government. ORSANCO operates programs to improve water quality in the Ohio River and its tributaries, including: setting waste water discharge standards; performing biological assessments; monitoring for the chemical and physical properties of the waterways; and conducting special surveys and studies. ORSANCO also coordinates emergency response activities for spills or accidental discharges to the river, and promotes public participation in programs, such as the Ohio River Sweep and the RiverWatchers Volunteer Monitoring Program. ORSANCO sets Pollution Control Standards for industrial and municipal waste water discharges to the Ohio River, and tracks certain dischargers whose effluent can seriously impact water quality. The standards designate specific uses for the Ohio, and establish guidelines to ensure that the river is capable of supporting these uses. To keep pace with current issues, ORSANCO reviews the standards every three years. As part of the review process, workshops and public hearings are held for public input.
PJM Interconnection (Multiple States) Delaware
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Maryland
Michigan
New Jersey
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia
District of Columbia
Interconnection Yes Non-Profit PJM (originally Pennsylvania, Jersey, Maryland) Interconnection is a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity in all or parts of Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. The PJM region has an area of 214,000 square miles, a population of about 60 million and a peak demand of 163,848 megawatts.
Public Utilities Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations
Generating Facility Rate-Making
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes State/Province This act aims to make energy services in the state reliable and efficient, while preserving the quality if the environment. It states the duties of public utilities in terms of accounts and reports. Every public utility shall furnish to the Commission all information required by it to carry into effect the provisions of this Act, and shall make specific answers to all questions submitted by the Commission. Whenever required by the Commission, every public utility shall deliver to the Commission, any or all maps, profiles, reports, documents, books, accounts, papers and records in its possession, or in any way relating to its property or affecting its business, and inventories of its property, in such form as the Commission may direct, or verified copies of any or all of the same.  All rates or other charges made, demanded or received by any product or commodity furnished or to be furnished or for any service rendered or to be rendered shall be just and reasonable. Every unjust or unreasonable charge made, demanded or received for such product or commodity or service is hereby prohibited and declared unlawful. All rules and regulations made by a public utility affecting or pertaining to its charges to the public shall be just and reasonable. The act also states regulations for electric cooperatives and municipal systems. The act also states regulations for "Alternative gas suppliers," which means every person, cooperative, corporation, municipal corporation, company, association, joint stock company or association, firm, partnership, individual, or other entity, their lessees, trustees, or receivers appointed by any court whatsoever, that offers gas for sale, lease, or in exchange for other value received to one or more customers, or that engages in the furnishing of gas to one or more customers, and shall include affiliated interests of a gas utility, resellers, aggregators and marketers, but shall not include (i) gas utilities (or any agent of the gas utility to the extent the gas utility provides tariffed services to customers through an agent); (ii) public utilities that are owned and operated by any political subdivision, public institution of higher education or municipal corporation of this State, or public utilities that are owned by a political subdivision, public institution of higher education, or municipal corporation and operated by any of its lessees or operating agents; (iii) natural gas cooperatives that are not-for-profit corporations operated for the purpose of administering, on a cooperative basis, the furnishing of natural gas for the benefit of their members who are consumers of natural gas; and (iv) the ownership or operation of a facility that sells compressed natural gas at retail to the public for use only as a motor vehicle fuel and the selling of compressed natural gas at retail to the public for use only as a motor vehicle fuel.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Illinois) Illinois Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Illinois as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (Indiana, North Dakota, South Dakota) may be lower.
Renewable Energy Business Development Grant Program (Illinois) Illinois Industry Recruitment/Support No State/Territory NOTE: The most recent application period closed on October 28, 2011. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations.

The Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity administers the Renewable Energy Business Development Grant Program. The program will support expenses related to the development, retooling, or expansion of renewable energy business and component manufacturers. Eligible costs include the purchase and installation of machinery, equipment and new industrial systems, necessary site improvements, technical or engineering services for process improvements, and the conversion of existing processes. Grant awards are available for between $100,000 and $500,000 and are limited to 50% of project costs. Applications will be accepted until October 28, 2011, subject to funding availability.

Renewable-energy technologies eligible for funding support include wind energy, solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, dedicated crops grown for energy production and organic waste biomass, hydropower that does not involve new construction or significant expansion of hydropower dams, and "other such alternative sources of environmentally preferable energy." Energy from the incineration, burning or heating of waste wood, tires, garbage, general household, institutional and commercial waste, industrial lunchroom or office waste, landscape waste, or construction or demolition debris is not eligible.

Projects must be located in Illinois. In addition, because the program is funded by the Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund, grants are available only to customers of utilities that impose the Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge, as defined in 20 ILCS 687/6-5. Participating utilities are listed on the application available at the program website. See the program web site for additional details and requirements.
Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund (Illinois) Illinois Public Benefits Fund Yes State/Territory Illinois's 1997 electric-industry restructuring legislation created separate public benefits funds that support renewable energy and residential energy efficiency. The Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund (RERTF) supports renewables through grants, loans and other incentives administered by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). The funding mechanism was established for 10 years in January 1998. In August 2007, funding was extended through December 12, 2015.*

Renewable-energy projects eligible for RERTF support include wind energy, solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, dedicated crops grown for energy production and organic waste biomass, hydropower that does not involve new construction or significant expansion of hydropower dams, and "other such alternative sources of environmentally preferable energy." Energy from the incineration, burning or heating of waste wood, tires, garbage, general household, institutional and commercial waste, industrial lunchroom or office waste, landscape waste, or construction or demolition debris is not eligible. Public Act 97-0072 also permits DCEO to award grants for smart grid technology, effective July 1, 2011. Click here to view open renewable energy grant opportunities funded by the RERTF.

The RERTF is supported by a surcharge on customers' electric bills and gas bills known as the Renewable Energy Resource and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge. Participation is required for investor-owned utilities, but voluntary for municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. Half of the money collected by the surcharges supports the RERTF, while the other half supports the Coal Technology Development Assistance Fund. The surcharge varies by customer class as follows:

  • $0.05 per month for residential electric service
  • $0.05 per month for residential gas service
  • $0.50 per month for nonresidential electric service with less than 10 megawatts (MW) of peak demand during the previous calendar year
  • $0.50 per month for nonresidential gas service with less than 4 million therms of gas during the previous calendar year
  • $37.50 per month for nonresidential electric service with at least 10 MW of peak demand during the previous calendar year
  • $37.50 per month for nonresidential gas service taking at least 4 million therms of gas during the previous calendar year
Approximately $100 million in revenue will be collected for the fund through December 2015. The RERTF receives approximately $5 million - $5.5 million per year to fund eligible projects. The 2012 Annual Report is available here.
Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Project Financing (Illinois) Illinois State Bond Program Yes State/Territory The Illinois Finance Authority (IFA) is a state conduit issuer of tax-exempt bonds and credit enhancement for projects in Illinois. IFA funding is available to commercial and non-profit entities as long as those entities meet strict eligibility criteria. In 2012, the legislature also added schools and community colleges to the list of eligible entities for energy conservation funding. Entities seeking funding must demonstrate that their projects provide a significant public benefit for the citizens of Illinois. In 2009, the IFA was authorized by legislation (S.B. 1906 and S.B. 390) to provide funding via issuance of tax-exempt bonds for renewable energy projects and energy efficiency projects.

For the purposes of this program, renewable energy projects include those that utilize wind, solar thermal energy, photovoltaic cells and panels, biodiesel, crops and organic waste biomass, trees and tree trimmings, hydropower, Illinois-produced landfill gas, geothermal, and "other alternative sources of environmentally preferable energy." Transmission lines and associated equipment used to transfer electricity created by renewable energy and renewable energy storage technologies are also eligible.
Renewable Portfolio Standard (Illinois) Illinois Renewables Portfolio Standard Yes State/Territory

In August 2007, Illinois enacted legislation (Public Act 095-0481) that created the Illinois Power Agency (IPA). The agency’s purpose is to develop electricity procurement plans for investor-owned electric utilities (EUs) supplying over 100,000 Illinois customers to ensure “adequate, reliable, affordable, efficient, and environmentally sustainable electric service at the lowest total cost.” The only EUs that meet these criteria and are therefore subject to the IPA procurement process are Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) and the Ameren Corporation companies (AmerenCILCO, AmerenIPL, and AmerenCIPCO).

The IPA plans and administers the competitive procurement processes that result in bilateral agreements between the utilities and wholesale electric suppliers. The procurement plans must include procurement of cost-effective renewable energy resources—per the RPS schedule outlined below. Originally, the RPS applied only to electricity sold retail under the bundled, fixed-price tariff for the above mentioned utilities.* However, amendments within Public Act 095-1027 that were later replaced with Public Act 096-0159 extended the scope of the RPS by requiring alternative retail electric suppliers (ARES) and EUs that sell outside their service territories to comply with the RPS starting June 1, 2009. (These entities are hereafter referred to collectively as ARES.) Municipal and cooperative utilities are exempt from the RPS. HB 1865, enacted in August 2011, allows multi-jurisdictional utilities with less than 100,000 Illinois customers to request a procurement plan from the IPA. Such utilities will be subject to the renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements.

The required percentages of each category and the total renewables percentage required (the overall standard) are listed in the tables below. The term EY refers to compliance period or “energy year” for the standard, which runs from June - May and is defined by the year in which an energy year ends.

Table 1: RPS schedule for EUs**

Energy Year Overall Standard
(% of Retail Electric Sales to Come from Renewables)
Solar Requirement
(% of the Standard)
% of Retails Electric Sales from Solar Wind Requirement
(% of the Standard)
% of Retail Electric Sales from Wind Distributed Generation Requirement
(% of the Standard)
% of Retail Electric Sales from Distributed Generation
EY 2009 2% -- -- 75% 1.50% - -
EY 2010 4% -- -- 75% 3.00% - -
EY  2011 5% -- -- 75% 3.75% - -
EY 2012 6% -- -- 75% 4.50% - -
EY 2013 7% 0.5% 0.0035% 75% 5.25% - -
EY 2014 8% 1.50% 0.120% 75% 6.00% 0.5% 0.04%
EY 2015 9% 3% 0.270% 75% 6.75% 0.75% 0.0675%
EY 2016 10% 6% 0.600% 75% 7.50% 1% 0.1%
EY 2017 11.5% 6% 0.690% 75% 8.625% 1% 0.115%
EY 2018 13% 6% 0.780% 75% 9.75% 1% 0.13%
EY 2019 14.5% 6% 0.870% 75% 10.875% 1% 0.145%
EY 2020 16% 6% 0.960% 75% 12.00% 1% 0.16%
EY 2021 17.5% 6% 1.05% 75% 13.125% 1% 0.175%
EY 2022 19% 6% 1.14% 75% 14.25% 1% 0.19%
EY 2023 20.5% 6% 1.23% 75% 15.375% 1% 0.205%
EY 2024 22% 6% 1.32% 75% 16.50% 1% 0.22%
EY 2025 23.5% 6% 1.41% 75% 17.625% 1% 0.235%
EY 2026 25% 6% 1.50% 75% 18.75% 1% 0.25%


Table 2: RPS schedule for ARES

Energy Year Overall Standard
(% of Retail Electric Sales to Come from Renewables)
Solar Requirement
(% of the Standard)
% of Retails Electric Sales from Solar Wind Requirement
(% of the Standard)
% of Retail Electric Sales from Wind
EY 2009 -- -- -- -- --
EY 2010 4% -- -- 60% 2.40%
EY 2011 5% -- -- 60% 3.00%
EY 2012 6% -- -- 60% 3.60%
EY 2013 7% -- -- 60% 4.20%
EY 2014 8% -- -- 60% 4.80 %
EY 2015 9% -- -- 60% 5.40%
EY 2016 10% 6% 0.60% 60% 6.00%
EY 2017 11.5% 6% 0.690% 60% 6.90%
EY 2018 13% 6% 0.780% 60% 7.80%
EY 2019 14.5% 6% 0.870% 60% 8.70%
EY 2020 16% 6% 0.960% 60% 9.60%
EY 2021 17.5% 6% 1.05% 60% 10.50%
EY 2022 19% 6% 1.14% 60% 11.40%
EY 2023 20.5% 6% 1.23% 60% 12.30%
EY 2024 22% 6% 1.32% 60% 13.20%
EY 2025 23.5% 6% 1.41% 60% 14.10%
EY 2026 25% 6% 1.50% 60% 15.00%


Per the statute, an EU’s renewable obligation "shall be measured as a percentage of the actual amount of electricity (megawatt-hours) supplied by the electric utility to eligible retail customers in the planning year ending immediately prior to the procurement." As an example of how this has been interpreted in practice, a utility's obligation for the compliance period starting June 1, 2008, (2%) was based on eligible sales from June 1, 2006, to May 31, 2007. The utilities conducted their own procurement for the first compliance period (approved by the Illinois Commerce Commission), but the IPA submits plans for and manage subsequent procurements. The IPA's first procurement plan, for the June 1, 2009 to May 31, 2010, period, is available in blank ICC Docket 08-0519. The IPA's procurement plan for June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2015 is available in ICC Docket 09-0373 (see the Order issued December 28, 2009).*** The 2013 draft procurement plan, covering EY 2014-EY 2018, is available on the program web site above.
The renewable obligation for ARES is measured as a percentage of the actual amount of metered electricity (megawatt-hours) supplied by the ARES in the compliance year, as reported for that year to the Commission. ARES must meet at least 50% of their renewable quota through alternative compliance payments (ACPs). The remaining 50% of the obligation may be met with ACP payments, or by procuring renewable energy or renewable energy credits (RECs). They must utilize the PJM Environmental System Generation Attribute Tracking System (PJM-GATS) or the Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS) to independently verify the quantity and source of renewable energy resources procured. The ICC has dedicated a web page to the Renewable Portfolio Standards For ARES.

The money derived from ACPs submitted by ARES is remitted directly to ICC. The ICC forwards that money to the IPA's Renewable Energy Resources Fund to be used for the purchase of RECs at a price not to exceed the winning bid prices for like resources under the IPA's procurements for electric utilities. Thus the IPA central procurement model used for bundled sales from electric utilities effectively extends to at least 50% (and possibly more) of the load served by ARES. The ACP rate fluctuates from year to year based on the results of IPA procurement events. For the first compliance year (June 1, 2009, to May 31, 2010) the ACP is $0.645/MWh for ARES operating in Ameren territory and $0.764/MWh for ARES operating in ComEd territory. The estimated ACP rate for 2010-2011 is $0.211/MWh for ARES operating in Ameren territory and $0.256/MWh for ARES operating in ComEd territory. Additional information on the ACP rate is found on the ICC web site.

For EUs, minimum of 75% of the renewable energy must come from wind power, and the remaining amount (25%) can come from other eligible renewables. For ARES, a minimum of 60% of the renewable energy must come from wind power, and the remaining amounts (40%) can come from other eligible renewables. These resources include solar thermal (electricity), photovoltaics (PV), dedicated crops grown for energy production, untreated and unadulterated organic waste biomass, trees and tree waste, in-state landfill gas, biodiesel, hydropower that does not involve the construction of new dams or significant expansion of existing dams, and "other such alternative sources of environmentally preferable energy," which may include (among other resources) waste heat from industrial processes. HB 1458 added anaerobic digestion to the list of eligible resources, effective August 22, 2011. Several means of energy production are specifically excluded from standard eligibility: the incineration of tires; garbage; general household, institutional and commercial waste; industrial or office waste; railroad ties; utility poles; landscape waste other than trees and tree waste; and construction or demolition debris other than untreated and unadulterated waste wood. For EUs, the solar requirement begins EY 2013 and ramps up to 6% of the standard by EY 2016, as summarized in the table. EUs must meet interim solar requirement percentages, but ARES are not subject to this requirement. Lastly, SB 1652 implemented a distributed generation requirement for EUs beginning in EY 2014. The requirement increases to 1% by EY 2016 and thereafter. To the extent possible, at least half of the resources procured from renewable energy generation must come from systems less than 25 kW in capacity.

In order for a system to qualify under the distributed generation requirement, systems must be 2 MW or less and powered by wind, solar thermal, PV, biodiesel, biomass, tree waste, or hydropower. The systems must also be interconnected on the customer side of the electric meter at the distribution system level of an EU, an ARES, a municipal utility, or a rural electric cooperative. The IPA will contract with third-party aggregators that will purchase the resources from individual distributed generators through contracts of at least 5 years and in groups of no less than 1 MW of capacity. Resources that are counted toward the distributed generation requirement may also count toward the wind and solar requirements.

Renewable energy may be procured either through energy bundled with RECs, or through the purchase of tradable RECs on their own. However, the IPA procurements for the distributed generation requirement will involve only RECs and not the associated energy. Utilities must retire credits that they use for compliance.

Renewable energy procurement is limited to “cost-effective” resources. There are two tests to determine cost-effectiveness. First, the increase in cost to retail customers from the RPS in 2008 cannot exceed 0.5% of the amount paid per kilowatt-hour (kWh) during the year ending May 31, 2007. The cost cap changes each year through 2011, when it is the greater of an additional 0.5% of the amount paid per kWh during the year ending in 2010, or 2% of the amount paid per kWh during the year ending May, 2007. Thereafter, the cost is limited to the greater of 2.015% of the amount per kWh paid in 2007, or the incremental amount paid in 2011. The Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) is to review the cap in 2011 and report to the General Assembly if it “unduly constrains the procurement of cost-effective renewable energy resources.” The second test of cost-effectiveness (established in the Public Act 095-1027) is that cost of procuring renewable resources must not exceed benchmarks based on market prices for renewable energy resources in the region, where the IPA procurement administrator will determine the benchmarks.

For EUs, through 2011, eligible resources must be located in-state. If there are insufficient cost-effective in-state resources, resources can be procured from adjoining states. If these also fail the cost-effectiveness tests, resources can be procured from other regions of the country. After 2011, equal preference is given to resources within IL and adjoining states. If neither is cost-effective, resources from other regions can be considered eligible.

The IPA has contracted two "Procurement Administrators" that support procurement of electricity supply and renewable energy, and these administrators maintain web sites for ComEd and Ameren< with additional information about requests for proposals. Compliance reports are due by September 1 to the ICC.

The Illinois Power Agency Act also requires utilities to establish annual energy-savings goals, through which utilities must meet 0.2% of energy delivered through cost-effective energy efficiency in 2008, rising to 2% of energy delivered in 2015 and thereafter. In February 2008, the ICC approved utility implementation plans for these requirements, available in Dockets 07-0539 (Ameren) and 07-0540 (ComEd).

Background
In 2001, the state passed the Illinois Resource Development and Energy Security Act, which included a voluntary renewable-energy goal of 5% by 2010 and 15% by 2020. The 2001 act did not include an implementation schedule, compliance rules, credit-trading provisions, or an energy-efficiency portfolio goal. In July 2005, the ICC adopted a resolution encouraging utilities to commit to a voluntary renewable portfolio goal of 8% by 2013, and an energy efficiency portfolio goal that utilities should reduce load growth by of 25% during 2015-2017.

* According to the June 2009 - May 2010 procurement plan (ICC Docket 08-0519), eligible retail sales comprised roughly 47% of total electricity usage by ComEd customers and 45% of Ameren customers' total electricity usage in June 2008.

**With regard to distributed generation requirements, the table below presents one possible interpretation of the language in SB 1652. An alternative interpretation could be that each of the individual resource tiers (solar, wind, and other renewables) are required to have a 1% distributed generation component.

*** The June 2010 - May 2015 procurement plan includes provisions for long-term contracts for 1,400,000 MWh per year (ComEd) and 600,000 MWh per year (Ameren), which represent approximately 3.5% of each utility's eligible retail load.

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois) Illinois Personal Tax Incentives
Property Tax Incentive
Sales Tax Incentive
Corporate Tax Incentive
Yes State/Province The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

The River Edge Redevelopment Zone Act authorizes DCEO to designate zones in four cities – Aurora, East St. Louis, Elgin and Rockford.

The River Edge Redevelopment Zone (RERZ) Program is designed to achieve its goals through the use of several incentives authorized by State law. Two of these – sales tax exemption and property tax abatement (if offered in the zone) – are administered by the local zone administrators. The others involve tax incentives that may be claimed on your Illinois Income Tax filing.
Sales Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Business Designated High Impact Business (Illinois) Illinois Sales Tax Incentive Yes State/Territory

A business establishing a new wind power facility in Illinois that will not be located in an Enterprise Zone* may be eligible for designation as a "High Impact Business." After receiving the designation, the facility is entitled to a full exemption of the state sales tax (6.25%) and any additional local state sales taxes for building materials incorporated into the facility. The project must involve a minimum of a $12 million investment creating 500 full-time jobs or an investment of $30 million causing the retention of 1,500 full-time jobs.

A wind power facility must be new (or an expansion of an existing facility) and placed in service on or after July 1, 2009. It must generate electricity using wind turbines 500 kW or greater. The associated transmission lines, substations and related equipment are included in the definition of a wind power facility.

A wind power facility must apply to the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) for designation as Wind Energy Business within the High Impact Business Program. Applications are accepted throughout the year; once an application is received, DCEO will respond within 30 days. Required application information is available in the administrative code (14 Ill. Adm. Code, Part 520.603). Once designation is granted, the business will be eligible for the sales tax benefits. As a condition of designation (and to receive the tax benefits), a Wind Energy Business will be required to comply with the Prevailing Wage Act for construction labor.


*Locating within an Enterprise Zone offers businesses a different package of incentives and makes them ineligible for designation as a High Impact Business.

School Energy Efficiency Grant Program (Illinois) Illinois State Grant Program Yes State/Territory Note: The most recent application period closed January 15, 2011. Check the program web site for the status of the next round of applications.


The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) is offering $50 Million in Energy Efficiency Matching Grants for Illinois Schools over the next two fiscal years. The initial round of grants opened on October 12, 2010 and concluded with applications due on or before January 15, 2011.

The ISBE Energy Efficiency Grants are a dollar-for-dollar state matching grant program for energy efficiency projects in schools. All state funded educational institutions within the state of Illinois are eligible. Grant awards are available up to $250,000 and can be used for insulation, windows, doors, energy controls, lighting, energy recovery, energy conservation, alternative energy systems and other projects designed to reduce energy consumption.

Application Process

Grant applicants may obtain application materials and instructions through the ISBE Web Application Security portal (IWAS). Upon completion, applications will be submitted to the school district for review and submission to the Regional Office of Education. The Regional Office of Education will then review the application and submit it to the Illinois State Board of Education.
Small Business Job Creation Tax Credit (Illinois) Illinois Personal Tax Incentives
Corporate Tax Incentive
Yes State/Province The Illinois Small Business Jobs Creation Tax Credit program provides small business owners and non-profits with an extra boost to grow their business over the next four years. After creating one or more new, full-time positions that meet the eligibility requirements, small businesses can register online to receive a $2,500 per job tax credit. The program officially went live on July 1, 2012 and this is for new jobs created July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2016. Eligible jobs are those that pay at least $10/hour or $18,200/annually and the position must be sustained for one full year from the hire date. DCEO (Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity) has created an extremely user friendly website which allows for an applicant to register both their business and their newly created job(s) from the comfort of their home or office.
Solar Renewable Energy Credits Illinois Performance-Based Incentive Yes State/Territory In August 2007, Illinois enacted legislation (Public Act 095-0481) that created the Illinois Power Agency (IPA). The agency’s purpose is to develop electricity procurement plans for investor-owned electric utilities (EUs) supplying over 100,000 Illinois customers to ensure “adequate, reliable, affordable, efficient, and environmentally sustainable electric service at the lowest total cost.” The only EUs that meet these criteria and are therefore subject to the IPA procurement process are Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) and the Ameren Corporation companies (AmerenCILCO, AmerenIPL, and AmerenCIPCO).

The IPA plans and administers the competitive procurement processes that result in bilateral agreements between the utilities and wholesale electric suppliers. The procurement plans must include procurement of cost-effective renewable energy resources per the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requirements, outlined here. The RPS include a solar requirement to be met with solar renewable energy credits (SRECs) with benchmarks beginning in Energy Year June 2012-May 2013. Each SREC represents the environmental attributes associated with 1 megawatt-hour of energy produced from solar energy. Selected suppliers are required to utilize either the PJM-EIS-GATS, M-RETS, or NARR tracking system.

In October 2011, the legislature passed S.B. 1652, which requires the IPA to conduct a procurement event for the acquisition of renewable energy credits (RECs) for the period of June 1, 2013 to December 31, 2017. This procurement process will take place throughout calendar year 2012. If needed, future procurement processes will be administered through the program administrators.

Ameren

The procurement process for Ameren is administered by Levitan and Associates here. REC bids for 2012 were due in May 2012. Ameren is seeking SRECs per the schedule outlined below.

Procurement Period Photovoltaic Target (# of SRECs)
June 1, 2013 - May 31, 2014 13,612
June 1, 2014 - May 31, 2015 27,332
June 1, 2015 - May 31, 2016 57,100
June 1, 2016 - May 31, 2017 58,326
June 1, 2017 - December 31, 2017 34,264

SRECs must be generated during the same time period as the procurement. More information, including application materials, is available on the Levitan and Associates web site.

ComEd

For ComEd, the procurement process is administered by NERA Economic Consulting. Applications for the 2012 procurement event were in February, 2012, and bidding took place in May 2012.
Solar Renewable Energy Credits (Illinois) Illinois Performance-Based Incentive Yes State/Territory In August 2007, Illinois enacted legislation (Public Act 095-0481) that created the Illinois Power Agency (IPA). The agency’s purpose is to develop electricity procurement plans for investor-owned electric utilities (EUs) supplying over 100,000 Illinois customers to ensure “adequate, reliable, affordable, efficient, and environmentally sustainable electric service at the lowest total cost.” The only EUs that meet these criteria and are therefore subject to the IPA procurement process are Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) and the Ameren Corporation companies (AmerenCILCO, AmerenIPL, and AmerenCIPCO).


The IPA plans and administers the competitive procurement processes that result in bilateral agreements between the utilities and wholesale electric suppliers. The procurement plans must include procurement of cost-effective renewable energy resources per the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requirements, outlined here. The RPS includes a solar requirement to be met with solar renewable energy credits (SRECs) with benchmarks beginning in Energy Year June 2012-May 2013. Each SREC represents the environmental attributes associated with 1 megawatt-hour of energy produced from solar energy. Selected suppliers are required to utilize either the PJM-EIS-GATS, M-RETS, or NARR tracking system.


In October 2011, the legislature passed S.B. 1652, which requires the IPA to conduct a procurement event for the acquisition of renewable energy credits (RECs) for the period of June 1, 2013 to December 31, 2017. This procurement process will take place throughout calendar year 2012. If needed, future procurement processes will be administered through the program administrators.


Ameren


The procurement process for Ameren is administered by Levitan and Associates here. REC bids for 2012 were due in May 2012. Ameren is seeking SRECs per the schedule outlined below.


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Solar and Wind Energy Rebate Program (Illinois) Illinois State Rebate Program Yes State/Territory The State of Illinois Renewable Energy Resources Program (RERP) promotes the development of smale scale distributed wind and solar systems in Illinois. This program is funded by the Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund - the state's public benefits fund - and is administered by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO).


Fiscal Year 2015 rates are listed below. The budget is roughly $2.5 million, and applications will be accepted through October 10, 2014. Rebate recipients will be selected from the pool of applicants based on random selection.


  • Residential PV: $1.50/watt or 25% of project costs
  • Commercial PV: $1.25/watt or 25% of project costs
  • Nonprofits and Public Sector PV: $2.50/watt or 40% of project costs
  • Residential and Commercial Wind (SWCC certified): $1.75/watt or 30% of project costs
  • Nonprofits and Public Sector Wind (SWCC certified): $2.60/watt or 40% of project costs
  • Wind energy systems that are not SWCC certified: $1.00/watt
  • Residential and Commercial Solar Thermal: 30% of eligible project costs
  • Nonprofits and Public Sector Solar Thermal: 40% of eligible project costs
Eligibility

The program is open to customers of investor-owned and municipal utilities, as well as electric cooperatives, which impose the Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge. A list of participating utilities is available on the program website. Eligible applicants include individuals, businesses, associations, public and private schools, colleges and universities, public sector entities, and nonprofit organizations. Rebates are available to applicants that contribute a minimum of 25% of the total project cost (applicant investment or in coordination with financial partners). Applicants may utilize funds from other incentive programs as well, so long as the total incentive from additional programs plus the RERP rebate does not exceed 75% of the project cost (this includes the Federal Individual Tax Credit).

Solar and Wind Equipment Requirements


Photovoltaic (PV) systems must have a rated design capacity of at least 1 kilowatt (kW) and either be listed by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or have successfully completed at least one year of field testing. Solar-thermal systems must have a rated design capacity of at least 0.5 therms or 50,000 Btus per day and be approved by the Solar Rating Certification Corporation (SRCC) or a comparable organization. Solar pool-heating systems are eligible for funding only if the pool is open to the general public on a regular basis. With respect to expansions to existing solar-energy systems, only those costs directly related to new panels (equipment and installation) are eligible for funding. Costs associated with new pumps, storage or any other balance-of-system components for expansion projects -– except for new panels –- are ineligible.

Wind energy systems must have a rated nameplate capacity ranging from 1 to 100 kilowatts. Eligible systems must be mounted on a tower of at least 60 feet in height on a land parcel of 1 acre or more. Applicants must also submit documentation verifying that the wind resource at the project site is suitable for wind generation (see the application for details). DCEO may consider urban turbines or other innovative design systems. All systems must be installed by a licensed, bonded and insured professional. For homeowners that choose to self-install systems, only the equipment costs will be eligible for the rebate. Systems certified by the Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) are recommended. Systems not certified by SWCC will qualify for smaller rebates.
Solid Waste Planning and Recycling Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes Local It is the purpose of this Act to provide incentives for decreased generation of municipal waste, to require certain counties to develop comprehensive waste management plans that place substantial emphasis on recycling and other alternatives to landfills, to encourage municipal recycling and source reduction, and to promote composting of yard waste.
Statewide Renewable Energy Setback Standards (Illinois) Illinois Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Yes State/Territory While Illinois does not have a model wind ordinance* in place, it has established a maximum setback limit for wind turbines.** State law has established that no municipality or county government may require a wind turbine (or other renewable energy system) used for onsite energy generation to be setback more than 1.1 times the height of the system from the end user's property line.

The Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs offers a database of county ordinances and zoning laws related to wind.

  • Typically, model wind ordinances address more than just setback limits, and may also include guidance/recommended policies regarding multiple turbines, lot sizes, sound, insurance, aesthetics, and height, among others.
    • The law specifies wind turbines as well as "other renewable energy system," but in practice this limit will apply to wind turbines for onsite generation and use.
Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as the preferred means for achieving compliance with environmental laws and regulations, to establish State programs that provide high-level attention to toxic pollution prevention policy initiatives, to integrate existing regulatory programs to promote toxic pollution prevention, and to stimulate toxic pollution prevention strategies by industry. The article establishes a Toxic Pollution Prevention Program, Assistance Program and Innovation Plan.
Waste Disposal (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.
Water Pollutant Discharge Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province The discharge of oil in quantities which exceed the standards adopted by the Pollution Control Board, or the discharge of other pollutants directly or indirectly into the waters is prohibited. Whenever any oil or other pollutant is discharged in violation of this act, any governmental body having such waters within its territorial limits is authorized to act to remove or arrange for the removal of such oil or other pollutants. The owner or operator of such facility from which oil or other pollutants are discharged in violation of this Act, shall be liable to such governmental body for the actual costs incurred for the removal of such oil or other pollutants. Such governmental body may, if necessary, bring an action in the circuit court for the recovery of the actual costs of removal, plus reasonable attorneys fee, court costs and other expenses of litigation. 
Water Pollution (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of these rules and regulations to designate the uses for which the various waters of the State shall be maintained and protected; to prescribe the water quality standards required to sustain the designated uses; to establish effluent standards to limit the contaminants discharged to the waters; and to prescribe additional regulations necessary for implementing, achieving and maintaining the prescribed water quality. It is also the purpose of these Regulations to meet the requirements of Section 402 of the Clean Water Act.
Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin) Wisconsin Siting and Permitting Yes Local Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water use permits exist: a general permit is required for withdrawals that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period but do not equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. An individual permit is required for withdrawals that equal at least 1,000,000 gallons per day for 30 consecutive days. There are no permit application fees.
Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (Illinois) Illinois Environmental Regulations Yes State/Province It is the policy of the State of Illinois to restore, protect, and enhance the groundwaters of the State, as a natural and public resource. The State recognizes the essential and pervasive role of groundwater in the social and economic well-being of the people of Illinois, and its vital importance to the general health, safety, and welfare. It is further recognized as consistent with this policy that the groundwater resources of the State be utilized for beneficial and legitimate purposes; that waste and degradation of the resources be prevented; and that the underground water resource be managed to allow for maximum benefit of the people of the State of Illinois. No non-community water system may be constructed, altered, or extended until plans, specifications, and other information relative to such system are submitted to and reviewed by the Department for conformance with the rules promulgated under this Section, and until a permit for such activity is issued by the Department. As part of the permit application, all new non-transient, non-community water systems must demonstrate technical, financial, and managerial capacity consistent with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. All private and semi-private water systems shall be constructed in accordance with the rules promulgated by the Department under this Section.  The Department shall inspect all non-community water systems for the purpose of determining compliance with the provisions of this Section and the regulations promulgated hereunder. The Department may inspect semi-private and private water systems for the purpose of determining compliance with the provisions of this Section and the regulations promulgated hereunder. The Department may conduct inspections to investigate the construction or water quality of non-community or semi-private water systems, or the construction of private water systems. Upon request of the owner or user, the Department may also conduct investigations of the water quality of private water systems.