How to Achieve a Four-Fold Productivity Increase at Fenton Hill

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Conference Paper: How to Achieve a Four-Fold Productivity Increase at Fenton Hill

Abstract
The most direct way to increase the productivity of the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir is by drilling a second production well to access the presently unavailable deeper southern portion of the reservoir. This second well, with no other operational changes, should approximately double the reservoir productivity. However, by also allowing a significant increase in the injection pressure level without inducing renewed reservoir growth, this second production well would indirectly provide an additional factor of 2 increase in reservoir productivity. Essentially, this second production well to the south of the existing injection well would establish a pressure sink in this previously static portion of the reservoir, precluding reservoir extension in this region for even higher levels of injection pressure. In this way, the ambient pressure level of the reservoir could be significantly increase, further dilating the joint network comprising the active reservoir flow system and thereby reducing the overall impedance to flow across the reservoir. If the augmented productivity of the present HDR reservoir as a consequence of pressure cycling in May 1993 is used as the base case, the anticipated thermal power production form a 3 well system at Fenton Hill would be about 20 MW, at a combined production flow rate of 340 gpm and at a production temperature of 204°C (400°F).

Author 
Donald W. Brown






Conference 
GRC Annual Meeting; Salt Lake City, Utah; 1994/10/02


Published 
Geothermal Resources Council, 1994





DOI 
Not Provided
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Online 
Internet link for How to Achieve a Four-Fold Productivity Increase at Fenton Hill

Citation

Donald W. Brown. 1994. How to Achieve a Four-Fold Productivity Increase at Fenton Hill. In: GRC Transactions. GRC Annual Meeting; 1994/10/02; Salt Lake City, Utah. Davis, California: Geothermal Resources Council; p. 405-408