Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho

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Journal Article: Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho

Abstract
The Blackfoot Reservoir region in southeastern Idaho is recognized as a potential geothermal area because of the presence of several young rhyolite domes (50,000 years old), Quaternary basalt flows, and warm springs. North- to northwest-trending high-angle normal faults of Tertiary to Holocene age appear to be the dominant structural control of spring activity. Surface spring-water temperatures average 14°C except for a group of springs west of the Reservoir Mountains which average 33°C. Chemical geothermometers applied to fifty water samples give temperatures less than 75°C except for eight springs along the Corral Creek drainage. The springs along Corral Creek have Na-K-Ca temperatures that average 354°C, a direct result of high potassium concentrations in the water. A correction for carbon dioxide applied to the Na-K-Ca geothermometer lowers the estimated temperatures of the anomalous springs to near the measured surface temperatures, and Na-K-Ca-Mg temperatures for the anomalous springs are near 100°C. Mixing model calculations suggest that hot water with a temperature of approximately 120°C may be mixing with cooler, more dilute water in the springs from the Corral Creek drainage, a temperature supported by Na-K-Ca-Mg temperatures and mineral saturation temperatures. Stability relations of low-temperature phases in the system indicate that the large concentrations of potassium in the eight anomalous springs are derived from reactions with the potassium-bearing minerals muscovite and K-feldspar. Carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide gases may be derived through the oxidation of organic matter accompanied by the reduction of sulfate. Concentrations of major and minor elements, and gases found in springs of the Blackfoot Reservoir region are due to water-rock reactions at temperatures less than 100°C. Based on spring geochemistry, a geothermal reservoir of 100°C up to 120°C may exist at shallow (less than 2 km) depths in the Blackfoot Reservoir region.

Authors 
Amy Hutsinpiller and W. T. Parry








Published Journal 
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1985





DOI 
Not Provided
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Citation

Amy Hutsinpiller,W. T. Parry. 1985. Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. (!) .