File:Application Note - Wind Powered Industrial Processes.pdf

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Summary

This Application Note outlines two methods to assess the viability of industrial processes, powered by an onsite wind turbine. Onsite wind power offers cost savings and other competitive advantages to companies capable of benefitting from it.

Both of the methods outlined focus on whether an organization has the flexibility needed to gain maximum benefit from self-consumption of onsite wind power.

The first method – the ‘Flexibility Checklist’ – sets out ten criteria that measure an industrial processes’ capacity to operate flexibly: energy efficiency; efficient energy storage; time behavior; partload-ability; overload-ability; synchrony; adaptation over short timescales; adaptation over long timescales; the activation rate; and whether the potential flexibility is conceptual or proven.

Companies can score themselves against each criterion. The Flexibility Checklist provides a quick and easy assessment of potential problems from powering industrial processes with on-site wind turbines, although it is not sufficiently thorough to enable final decision-making.

The second method – the ‘Flexibility Audit’ – starts with a comprehensive assessment of an industrial sites’ potential flexibility. The audit will search for potential flexibilities right down to the individual device level. The auditors take an open-minded approach in order to uncover flexibility where it is not expected. Data from the audit are combined with data on the company’s power consumption and business processes to model optimum solutions. The Flexibility Audit requires greater commitment from the company, but delivers results that are built on tested data.

The concept of value in flexibility is relatively new to most company managers. The identification of flexibility is not part of most energy reviews. Grid regulation across Europe has been blind to the benefits of onsite wind power with local consumption. Transmission, distribution and generation companies have little reason to champion the concept because it would result in a loss of generation, transmission and service revenues. Given the newness of the concept and the institutional unpreparedness, there may be some reluctance on the part of companies to invest in on-site wind generation for self-consumption. However, researchers modeling with both the Flexibility Checklist and the Flexibility Audit have identified strong business cases

From a technological point of view, there are no insurmountable barriers to the concept and, if circumstances are favorable, wind-powered processes could be a real benefit to industrial companies daring to take the step.

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PD This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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current05:27, 7 May 2015Thumbnail for version as of 05:27, 7 May 20151,240 × 1,754, 18 pages (1.03 MB)Hdkeulenaer (Talk | contribs)This Application Note outlines two methods to assess the viability of industrial processes, powered by an onsite wind turbine. Onsite wind power offers cost savings and other competitive advantages to companies capable of benefitting from it. Both of...

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