Drill Core-Based Facies Reconstruction Of A Deep-Marine Felsic Volcano Hosting An Active Hydrothermal System (Pual Ridge, Papau New Guinea, Odp Leg 193)

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Journal Article: Drill Core-Based Facies Reconstruction Of A Deep-Marine Felsic Volcano Hosting An Active Hydrothermal System (Pual Ridge, Papau New Guinea, Odp Leg 193)

Abstract
Pual Ridge is a deep-marine, felsic volcanic edifice in the eastern Manus back-arc basin (Papua New Guinea) with an estimated volume of ~6 to 9 km3. It is 1-1.5 km wide, 20 km long and rises 500-600 m above the surrounding ocean floor. The active PACMANUS hydrothermal field on the crest of Pual Ridge at 1640-1690 m below sea level was the target of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 193. Variably altered dacite lavas have been recovered from the subsurface of a low-T discharge site (Snowcap) and a high-T black smoker site (Roman Ruins) reaching a maximum depth of 380 m below seafloor (mbsf). Volcanic facies interpretation of these cores is difficult due to incomplete recovery and widespread pseudoclastic textures generated by fracturing and multi-phase, incomplete fluid-dacite interaction. However, distinction of genuine volcaniclastic facies and facies with alteration-related clastic appearance is important in order to define paleo-seafloor positions within the volcanic stratigraphy, that may be prospective for massive sulfide mineralization. This has been accomplished using remnant primary characteristics indicative of transportation such as polymictic composition, grading or textural evidence for differential movement of individual clasts. Three phases of volcanic activity can be distinguished and a proximal facies association dominated by coherent facies of dacite lavas exists below Snowcap. At Roman Ruins, a medial facies association consists of lava flows with about equal proportions of coherent and volcaniclastic facies. Endogenous growth was an important process during lava flow emplacement and groundmass textures such as perlite, flow banding and spherulites indicate that cooling rates were variable, locally allowing for high-temperature devitrification. A tube pumice breccia unit is interpreted as the resedimented facies of a quench fragmented, highly vesicular dacite lava carapace. Sulfide accumulations in the subsurface are restricted to Roman Ruins suggesting that the abundance of volcaniclastic facies favored ascent of metal-bearing fluids due to the inherent high permeability. Evidence for mineralization at paleo-seafloor positions at 110 and 195 mbsf indicate a complex interrelationship between volcanic and hydrothermal activity. A facies model has been developed which may help to locate subaqueous, felsic lava-dominated volcanic centers and associated sulfide deposits in ancient volcano-sedimentary successions.

Authors 
H. Paulick, D. A. Vanko and C. J. Yeats








Published Journal 
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 2004





DOI 
Not Provided
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Citation

H. Paulick,D. A. Vanko,C. J. Yeats. 2004. Drill Core-Based Facies Reconstruction Of A Deep-Marine Felsic Volcano Hosting An Active Hydrothermal System (Pual Ridge, Papau New Guinea, Odp Leg 193). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. (!) .