Delaware/EZFeed Policies

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EZ Feed Policies for Delaware

Download EZFeed Policies for Delaware CSV (rows 1 - 22)

Policy Place Policy Type Active Affected Technologies Implementing Sector Summary
Accidental Release Program (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Yes Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The Delaware Accidental Release Prevention Regulation contains requirements for owners or operators of stationary sources having regulated extremely hazardous substances onsite to develop and implement a risk management program (RMP) that anticipates and minimizes the chances of catastrophic events.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region III approved the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s (DNREC) request to implement and enforce its accidental release prevention program in place of similar federal requirements on August 7, 2001. The Delaware regulation adopts the Federal requirements found in regulation 40 CFR Part 68 with some adjustments and substitutions. Delaware’s regulation includes additional requirements for sources not regulated by the Federal program.

Delaware did not request Federal approval for these more stringent requirements but rather uses State authority under 7 Del. C. Chapter 77 Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act to implement and enforce these requirements.
Brownfields Assistance Matching Grants (Delaware) Delaware Grant Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Brownfield Assistance Program, administrated by the Delaware Economic Development Office (DEDO) and funded from Delaware Strategic Fund, provides matching grants to owners and developers to encourage the redevelopment of environmentally distressed sites within the state. Brownfield redevelopment is an important tool for Delaware's livable growth, recycling the state's land and cleaning up the environment within areas designed for growth. However, these sites cannot be revitalized without the help of developers, commercial real estate firms, lenders, and property owners. In the past, concerns over liability and the added cost of cleaning up a site have hindered the redevelopment of Brownfields. The state of Delaware understands the risks are higher for these projects and, in response, provides financial incentives and a fast track cleanup process.

The program is administered in collaboration with the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and offers the lesser of up to $100,000 or 50 percent of the costs associated with the investigation and remediation of a Brownfield site. Phase I costs are excluded from the Program and unlike the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC)’s Program, each project must have an employment impact of a minimum of five permanent full-time jobs. To be eligible for DEDO’s Program, the owner, prospective owner or developer must first obtain a Brownfield Certification through DNREC that recognizes the site as a Brownfield. After Certification has been obtained, an application can be sent to DEDO for evaluation and processing. Eligibility for Brownfield assistance will be based on the project’s potential to serve a public purpose by maintaining or expanding employment in the State, by maintaining, expanding, or diversifying business and industry in the State, and/or maintaining or increasing its tax base.

Associated with the program is the Delaware Brownfields Marketplace, a list of Brownfield sites available for redevelopment in Delaware.
Clean Energy Technology Device Manufacturers' Credits (Delaware) Delaware Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Wind energy
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Qualified manufacturers can apply for a tax break equal to 75% of the corporation income tax. The incentive is an increase from the Investment and Employment Credit Against Corporation Income Tax, raising the multiplier of the credit for the number of employees from $500 to $750. The business must have made an investment of at least $200,000 in the past 12 months, and must employ at least five people.
Climate Action Plan (Delaware) Delaware Climate Policies Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province To better understand the current and future vulnerabilities and risks to climate change, DNREC Secretary Collin O’Mara directed the Division of Energy and Climate to conduct a statewide climate change vulnerability and risk assessment.

The Delaware Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment reflects the best available climate science, climate modeling, and projections to illustrate the range of potential vulnerabilities that Delaware may face from the impacts of climate change. The Assessment will provide a strong scientific foundation for the development of the state’s adaptation planning and strategy.

The Delaware Climate Change Steering Committee was created to oversee the Assessment process. The Steering Committee’s membership includes some of Delaware’s leading scientists and practitioners. Their charge is to ensure the Assessment adheres to the highest levels of scientific integrity and that the information presented is applicable for future work in the state. Members represent the fields of agriculture, ecosystems and wildlife, climate, public health, water resources, and infrastructure.

In 2000, the Delaware Climate Change Action Plan (DCCAP) was prepared with funding from the Delaware State Energy Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s State and Local Climate Change Program. The Center for Energy and Environmental Policy of the University of Delaware researched and wrote the Action Plan with the guidance and advice of the Delaware Climate Change Consortium (DCCC), comprised of representatives from government, business, labor, environment and community-based organizations. In this Action Plan, the DCCC has developed a set of policy options that can reduce Delaware’s greenhouse gas emissions by 7% below the 1990 level. This amounts to a decrease of almost 25% in State emissions by 2010.

Three levels of implementation were devised: a Full Implementation scenario involving the adoption of all measures (i.e. 100%); a Major Commitment scenario which seeks to realize 65% of the reductions identified in the DCCAP through aggressive state policies and supporting federal strategies; and a Modest Commitment scenario with 35% of the DCCAP’s reductions targeted for state action and supporting federal initiatives. A detailed emissions reduction policy strategy is included in the DCCAP and is based on detailed analyses of a wide range of policy measures applicable to each sector of energy use. To ensure applicability to Delaware, the final selection of options was determined on the basis of cost-effectiveness. Implementation of the Action Plan will require adoption of a policy agenda that encourages the state’s government, industries, and citizen organizations to participate actively in a wide range of implementation activities. Such cooperation would involve legislative initiatives, community input and support, and education and outreach.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) United States Grant Program
Loan Program
Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Dam Safety (Delaware) Delaware Safety and Operational Guidelines Yes Hydroelectric energy State/Province The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare. The law requires licensing, inspections and preparation of emergency action plans (EAPs) for publicly owned dams with a high or significant hazard potential. A dam’s hazard potential classification depends upon the threat to downstream communities and infrastructure in the event of a dam failure and is not related to the condition of a dam. The Delaware Dam Safety Program was developed to reduce the risk of failure of dams and to prevent injuries to persons, damage to downstream property and loss of reservoir storage. The Dam Safety Regulations, adopted on December 11, 2009, establish requirements for licensing existing dams; permitting construction of new dams and repairs to existing dams; conducting inspections; performing maintenance; and preparing EAPs. In 2007, DNREC was awarded state funding to develop Emergency Action Plans for Delaware’s highest priority, state-owned, high-hazard dams.
Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program (Delaware) Delaware Grant Program Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program is funded by the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Fund, established by the Act to Amend Title 7 of the Delaware Code Relating to a Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and CO2 Emission Trading Program.

The Fund allocates 10 percent of the proceeds derived from the auction of carbon allowances under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) to projects and other actions that result in a measurable reduction of greenhouse gases. Projects must result in quantifiable and verifiable reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in Delaware not otherwise required by federal or state law and not receiving funding from any other state sources.

Delaware-based businesses, state/municipal agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) such as business sector associations, homeowner associations, academia and/or non-profit assistance providers are eligible to apply for funding under this Grant Program.
Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the existence and location of state resource areas, their degree of endangerment, an evaluation of their importance, and information related to their natural, historic or open space values.

The Act also established an Open Space Program. The Open Space Program oversees the protection of designated State Resource Areas (SRA). These areas are permanently protected through the buying of various state lands including parks, fish and wildlife areas, forests, nature preserves and cultural sites.

Many SRAs are not protected through acquisition – the intent has not been to purchase all SRAs. Rather, the purpose of the SRAs is to guide state acquisition of open space from willing sellers and to be incorporated by counties in their land use plans.

Designation of an SRA does not prohibit development, and does not change the underlying zoning. The designation provides that county ordinances, standards, criteria and/or requirements for SRAs will allow for environmentally sensitive development that protects the natural, cultural and geological resources in those areas.
Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
New York
Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
State/Province The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware). Its five members include the basin state governors and the Division Engineer, North Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who serves as the federal representative. The commission has legal authority over both water quality and water quantity-related issues throughout the basin.

Much of the new drilling interest taking place in northeastern Pennsylvania and southern New York is targeted at reaching the natural gas found in the Marcellus Shale formation, which underlies about 36 percent of the Delaware River Basin.

In connection with natural gas drilling, the commission has identified three major areas of concern:

1) Gas drilling projects in the Marcellus Shale or other formations may have a substantial effect on the water resources of the basin by reducing the flow in streams and/or aquifers used to supply the significant amounts of fresh water needed in the natural gas mining process. 2) On-site drilling operations may potentially add, discharge or cause the release of pollutants into the ground water or surface water. 3) The recovered "frac water" must be treated and disposed of properly.

While the Delaware River itself is un-dammed, there are 13 dams within the basin that feed into the river. The Commission holds authority to approve any project that will have a substantial effect on the water resources of the basin.

The Commission also has approval authority over energy projects that need to draw water from the basin, including coal plants, biomass plants, and natural gas extraction and power plants.
Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals, recommendations, and standards for turning waste into energy for the state.
Delaware Strategic Fund (Delaware) Delaware Grant Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Delaware Strategic Fund represents the primary funding source used by Delaware Economic Development Authority (DEDA) to provide customized loans and grants to businesses for job creation, relocation and expansion. For businesses considering locating in the state of Delaware, financial assistance may be provided in the form of low interest loans, grants, or other creative instruments to support the attraction of businesses that pay sustainable wages. Assistance terms are negotiated specific to each firm’s individual needs and situation. The process for obtaining Strategic Fund assistance requires completing an Application for Financial Assistance. Competition for the limited amount of funding available each year is strong and approval is not automatic. Applications are first reviewed by the DEDO Internal Investment Committee and if approved will be presented at a Council on Development Finance meeting. If the CDF recommend financial assistance from the Strategic Fund, a formal agreement will be prepared for execution. This agreement will contain business terms plus a customized recapture provision based on forecasted jobs and minimum salary requirements determined by location.
Environmental Control (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This act has various provisions set for the local governments for greenhouse gas trading initiatives, solid waste recycling and water protection. The act also includes the Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program with a detailed account of fees to be paid for air pollution sources. The act establishes the collection of CO2 allowances, with 65 percent of the proceeds directed to the Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU). The SEU may use the funds for the promotion of energy conservation, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy financing.
Environmental Permit Application Background Statement (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The purpose of Chapter 79 of Delaware Title 7 is to ensure that the State has adequate information about the background of applicants or regulated parties for the purposes of processing permits and conducting other regulatory activities in fields that directly impact Delaware’s air and water quality and environmental health.

Regulated parties obtaining permits to discharge pollutants, manage wastes, or make commercial use of the coastal zone and the State's subaqueous lands must submit an annual report, thus allowing the State to identify parties with histories of environmental violations or criminal activities, or who cannot demonstrate the required responsibility, expertise or competence which is necessary for safe operation.

The subchapter also defines penalties for parties with chronic violator status, providing a mechanism to prevent or correct circumstances in which: (1) One or more of the traditional enforcement tools and regulatory programs of the Department appear insufficient to conform behavior and deter future violations by the regulated party; or

(2) The regulated party appears to be treating penalties and other sanctions as merely an on-going business expense rather than as symptomatic of underlying problems and threats to the State's environment that must be addressed and corrected.
Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

Extremely toxic substances: Substances regulated because of their extreme toxicity, ability to disperse, and quantity.

Explosive substances: Substances regulated because of their extreme reactivity, instability or explosiveness and creation of associated pressure waves, either inside of confined spaces or in the open atmosphere.

Flammable and combustible substances: Substances regulated because of their ability to ignite and burn rapidly, thus creating the possibility of high thermal exposure.

This act provides the foundation for the Accidental Release Program, which regulates extremely hazardous substances through the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control.
Forestry Policies (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province Delaware's forests are managed by the State Forest Service (DFS), within the State Department of Agriculture. In 2010, the Forest Service issued its Resource Assessment and Strategy documents:

Delaware Forest Resource Assessment: http://dda.delaware.gov/forestry/061810_DFS_ResourceAssessment.pdf

Statewide Forest Strategy: http://dda.delaware.gov/forestry/061810_DFS_Strategy.pdf

The Forest Strategy document sets several goals with respect to biomass energy, including an analysis of the resource, developing restrictions on wood energy facilities, promoting a Fuels for Schools program, and developing at least one new market for low-value wood such as bio-energy.
Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Coal with CCS
Natural Gas
Biomass/Biogas
State/Province The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act includes sources that generate, store, transport, treat or dispose of hazardous wastes. The DNREC's Division of Waste and Hazardous Substances was developed for the management of hazardous waste under the provisions of this act. The division operates numerous programs to meet the requirements of the act.
Natural Gas Regulation - Delaware Public Service Commission (Delaware) Delaware Generating Facility Rate-Making Yes Natural Gas State/Province The Delaware Public Service Commission regulates only the distribution of natural gas to Delaware consumers. The delivery and administrative costs associated with natural gas distribution are determined in base rate proceedings before the Commission. The recovery of costs associated with the natural gas used by customers is determined annually as part of fuel adjustment proceedings. As a result of this process, rates for natural gas will typically change at least once a year. Fuel adjustment rates for natural gas may also change during the annual recovery period when the projected recovery of gas costs exceeds limits set for the over or under-collection of gas costs. Occasionally, natural gas distribution companies are permitted by their tariff to collect additional fees, often called 'riders', to recover unanticipated or extraordinary expenses. For instance, both regulated natural gas distribution companies have an 'environmental rate rider' to recover costs associated with the cleanup of pollution from old manufactured gas sites. These rider rates are determined in separate proceedings before the Commission. The Commission sets the natural gas tariff regulations for each Delaware utility. Tariffs for Delmarva Power and Light Company and the Chesapeake Utilities Corporation are dependent on the county and service area.
PJM Interconnection (Multiple States) Delaware
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Maryland
Michigan
New Jersey
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia
District of Columbia
Interconnection Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
Non-Profit PJM (originally Pennsylvania, Jersey, Maryland) Interconnection is a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity in all or parts of Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. The PJM region has an area of 214,000 square miles, a population of about 60 million and a peak demand of 163,848 megawatts.
Pollution Prevention Act (Delaware) Delaware Environmental Regulations Yes Biomass/Biogas State/Province This act lays out objectives for pollution prevention, education and outreach.

The Department shall create a multimedia waste reduction assistance program to provide technical assistance to targeted industries, focusing on small companies within the industry because, for the most part, they do not have the economic or technical resources necessary to acquire recommendations on how to effectively minimize their wastes. The program will be made available to other industries which request assistance. The overall objective of the multimedia opportunity audit program is to reduce or recycle, to the maximum extent practicable, all waste streams within an industry.

An information clearinghouse shall be established and located at the Delaware Economic Development Office. The clearinghouse will contain a database of pollution prevention technologies and case studies of technology applications.

The Department shall increase public awareness of the need for individual and community based pollution prevention programs by conducting educational workshops and industry seminars.

The Department shall produce a pollution prevention newsletter to be distributed to industry and the public.

The Implementation Committee shall select the target industry and location for the initial technical assistance program. The Committee shall evaluate the technical assistance program 1 year after the program commences or upon completion, whichever is earlier. The Committee shall then select a second target industry or location for the technical assistance program.
Public Utilities Tax Rebate (Delaware) Delaware Corporate Tax Incentive Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This rebate is part of the Blue Collar Jobs Act, which establishes tax breaks for businesses that have sustainable jobs and make significant investments in the state. Firms meeting the criteria for targeted industry tax credits are eligible for a rebate of 50 percent of the public utilities tax imposed on new or increased consumption of natural gas and electricity for four years. The public utilities tax rate is 4.25 percent. The utility tax on the consumption of electric by licensed manufacturers and food or agribusiness processors is reduced from 4.25 percent to 2 percent.
Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Delaware) Delaware Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Delaware as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic and energy delivery requirements, ownership, registry, and other requirements may apply, such as resource eligibility, generator vintage and capacity limitations, as well as limits on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) vintage. The listing applies to RPS Main Tiers only, and excludes solar or distributed generation that may require interconnection only within the RPS state. This assessment is based on energy delivery requirements and reasonable transmission availability. Acceptance of unbundled RECs varies. There may be additional sales opportunities in RPS states outside the Eastern Interconnection. REC prices in markets with voluntary goals (Indiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Virginia) may be lower.
Renewable Energy Facilities Revolving Loan Fund (Delaware) Delaware Loan Program Yes Concentrating Solar Power
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province Renewable Energy Facilities Revolving Loan Fund provides loans at market to below-market interest rates to businesses that cannot otherwise obtain capital, provided that those businesses will create or retain jobs in industries that promote energy efficiency and/or recycling. The new fund was made possible with a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce, which was matched by the Delaware Strategic Fund. Loan proceeds can only be used for the following: manufacturing, integrating, fabricating and assembling alternative energy equipment in the State of Delaware. Alternative energy equipment is defined as wind, solar, geothermal, fuel cells, and biomass.
Tax-Exempt Bond Financing (Delaware) Delaware Bond Program Yes Coal with CCS
Concentrating Solar Power
Energy Storage
Fuel Cells
Geothermal Electric
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Tidal Energy
Wave Energy
Wind energy
Biomass/Biogas
Hydroelectric energy
Hydroelectric (Small)
Solar Photovoltaics
State/Province The Delaware Economic Development Authority provides tax-exempt bond financing for financial assistance to new or expanding businesses, governmental units and certain organizations that are exempt from federal income taxation.

Eligible Projects: The availability of tax-exempt status for bonds issued to finance a given project is governed by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”) and the regulations and administrative rulings of the Internal Revenue Service.

In general, eligible projects include the following major categories:

Qualified 501(c)(3) Bonds - Tax-exempt bonds can be issued for the benefit of organizations that are tax exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Code, if 95 percent of the net proceeds of the bonds are used by the organization in furtherance of its exempt purpose. Depending on the project being financed, certain other limitations may apply.

Exempt Facility Bonds - Tax-exempt bonds can be issued to finance certain types of utility projects, including sewage facilities, solid waste disposal facilities, facilities for the local furnishing of electricity and gas and other types of facilities.