Definition: Offshore Wind Energy

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Offshore Wind Energy

Offshore wind energy is a clean, domestic, renewable resource that can help the United States meet its critical energy, environmental, and economic challenges. By generating electricity from offshore wind turbines, the nation can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and help revitalize key sectors of its economy, including manufacturing. However, realizing these benefits will require overcoming key barriers to the development and deployment of offshore wind technology, including its relatively high cost of energy, technical challenges surrounding installation and grid interconnection, and the untested permitting processes governing deployment.[1]

Wikipedia Definition


Also Known As
Offshore wind power
Related Terms
windenergywind farmswind turbines
References
  1. http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy12osti/49222.pdf
The Middelgrunden Wind Farm was established as a collaboration between Middelgrunden Wind Turbine Cooperative and Copenhagen Energy, each installing 10 2-MW Bonus wind turbines. The farm is located off the coast of Denmark. Photo from H.C. Sorensen, NREL 17856

Resources

National Wildlife Federation. (2014). Catching the Wind: State Actions Needed to Seize the Golden Opportunity of Atlantic Offshore Wind Power
According to this report, more than 1.5 million acres off the Atlantic coast already designated for wind energy development could generate over 16,000 megawatts of electricity, enough to power more than 5 million homes.

U.S. Department of Energy. (2011). A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in the United States
The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this report to outline the actions it will take to support the development of a world-class offshore wind industry in the United States.

U.S. Department of Energy. (2013). Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis
This report shows progress for the U.S. offshore wind energy market in 2012, including the completion of two commercial lease auctions for federal Wind Energy Areas and 11 commercial-scale U.S. projects representing more than 3,800 megawatts of capacity reaching an advanced stage of development. The report provides information on offshore wind’s potential to add to U.S. electricity capacity and create jobs and outlines policy developments that influence the sector.

U.S. Department of Energy. (January 2014). Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region.
To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes Region (defined here as all U.S. states that touch Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin).

U.S. Department of Energy. (January 2014). Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region
To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Gulf of Mexico (defined here as Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida).

U.S. Department of Energy. (January 2014). Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region
To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Mid-Atlantic (defined here as New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia).

U.S. Department of Energy. (July 2013). Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region
To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

U.S. Department of Energy. (2012). Strengthening America's Energy Security with Offshore Wind
This fact sheet describes the benefits of and barriers to offshore wind, as well as the U.S. Department of Energy's planned activities in this area.