Cinder Cone

From Open Energy Information


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Cinder Cone:
Cinder cones, also known as scoria or spatter cones, are a relatively simple type of volcano consisting of a steep conical pile of volcanic ash and tephra. They exhibit a lower profile than stratovolcanoes (usually rising no more than a thousand feet above the surrounding topography), and typically have a bowl-shaped depression at their summits. They form primarily from the eruption of pyroclastic ejecta and are commonly encountered on the flanks of stratovolcanoes, shield volcanoes, and calderas.
Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle


Topographic Features

List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas:
Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical cinder cone.[1]


"Cinder cones are the simplest type of volcano. They are built from particles and blobs of congealed lava ejected from a single vent. As the gas-charged lava is blown violently into the air, it breaks into small fragments that solidify and fall as cinders around the vent to form a circular or oval cone. Most cinder cones have a bowl-shaped crater at the summit and rarely rise more than a thousand feet or so above their surroundings. Cinder cones are numerous in western North America as well as throughout other volcanic terrains of the world."[1]

Examples

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CSV

Geothermal
Resource
Area
Geothermal
Region
Tectonic
Setting
Host
Rock
Age
Host
Rock
Lithology
Mean
Capacity
Mean
Reservoir
Temp
Kilauea East Rift Geothermal AreaHawaii Geothermal RegionHot SpotQuaternaryTholeiitic Basalt47 MW
47,000 kW
47,000,000 W
47,000,000,000 mW
0.047 GW
4.7e-5 TW
575.15 K
302 °C
575.6 °F
1,035.27 °R
Long Valley Caldera Geothermal AreaWalker-Lane Transition ZoneExtensional TectonicsQuaternaryBishop Tuff, Metamorphic Basement38 MW
38,000 kW
38,000,000 W
38,000,000,000 mW
0.038 GW
3.8e-5 TW
513.15 K
240 °C
464 °F
923.67 °R

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 John Watson. Principal Types of Volcanoes [Internet]. 2011. U.S. Geological Survey. [updated 2011/01/03;cited 2013/12/24]. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volc/types.html