All EZ Policy Table

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EZ Feed Policy Table

Incentive Policy Type Implementing Sector Summary
401 Certification (Vermont) Environmental Regulations State/Province A 401 Certification is required for any project that triggers a federal permit or license. Examples include licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and any project which requires a permit from the Army Corps of Engineers for dredging or placement of fill in federally protected waters or wetlands. Hydroelectric projects subject to FERC licensing and re-licensing require a 401. Projects must comply with the Clean Water Act, the Vermont Water Quality Standards and any other requirements of state law.
AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Credit (REC) Purchase Program (Ohio) Performance-Based Incentive Utility Note: This program is currently closed. All RECs were required to be transfered into AEP Ohio's GATS account by July 15, 2013 in order to be eligible for the program. No information is available regarding future solicitations. Check the program web site for more information.


As part of AEP Ohio's Renewable Energy Credit (REC) Purchase Program, customers can sell their RECs produced from solar photovoltaic or wind energy systems. One REC is the environmental attributes of one megawatt hour (MWH) of electricity produced from a renewable source. Systems must be located within AEP's service territory and must have been placed in service on or after January 1, 1998. Only RECs created after July 31, 2008 and before June 30, 2013 qualify for the program. The customer must have an interconnection agreement with AEP Ohio, and the customer must have a utility grade meter installed with their system in order to record energy production. For systems less than 6 kW, customers can use the data tracking system that is built into their inverter if it is approved by the Public Utility Commission of Ohio. All systems must be registered with the State of Ohio, and the RECs must be registered in PJM-GATS.


For wind facilities, customers will receive $34 per REC. For solar facilities, customers will receive $300 per REC for RECs purchased in 2011, and $262.50 per REC purchased in 2012 or 2013. RECs must be transferred to AEP Ohio's GATS account by January 15, 2012 in order to receive 2011 prices, by January 15, 2013 to receive 2012 prices, and by July 15, 2013 in order to receive 2013 prices. Payments are issued to the customer a month after the transfer deadlines.


In order to enter the program, customers must contact the Distributed Generation Coordinator below. Detailed requirements and a sample agreement are available on the program website.


Customers that install solar or wind may alternatively choose to participate in the Renewable Energy Technology (RET) Incentive Program. Customers who participate in the RET program receive a financial incentive based on the size or estimated output of their system, but must commit their RECs to AEP Ohio.
AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Technology Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Utility As part of the Renewable Energy Technology (RET) Program, AEP Ohio offers incentives to customers that commit their Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) to AEP Ohio for 15 years. Incentives are available for wind and solar photovoltaic systems that are installed after July 1, 2011 and before June 30, 2013. Systems must be located in the AEP service area, and must have their RECs registered in the PJM Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). Solar photovoltaic systems are eligible for a $1.50/watt incentive. Residential systems must be at least 2 kW DC, and incentives are capped at $12,000 per customer or 50% of the system cost. Non-residential systems must be at least 10 kW DC, and incentives are capped at $75,000 or 50% of the system cost. Wind incentives are based on expected annual output, receiving $0.275/kWh. Residential incentives are capped at $7,500 or 50% of the system cost, and non-residential systems are capped at $12,000 or 40% of the system cost. Both residential and non-residential wind systems must have an annual output of at least 3,000 kWh/year AC.


Project equipment cannot be ordered, purchased, or installed prior to the execution of an agreement with AEP Ohio. All systems must be tied to AEP's electrical grid, comply with AEP's Interconnection Requirements, and must take service under AEP's Schedule Net Energy Metering Service. All applicable permits and inspections must be obtained. Additional requirements and application materials are available on the program website.


Customers who install renewable energy systems may choose to maintain ownership over their RECs and sell the RECs to AEP through the REC Purchase Program instead of participating in the RET program.
AEP SWEPCO - SMART Source Solar PV Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility Southwestern Electric Power Company (SWEPCO) offers rebates to customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes. Rebates may be assigned to the customer, a service provider, or a third party.

Rebates are offered at a rate of $1.50 per watt (DC) for residential installations and $1.20 per watt (DC) for non-residential installations. The maximum per project and per customer rebate for residential systems is $15,000 and for non-residential systems is $30,000. Individual system size is limited by the Texas interconnection and net metering limits for distributed renewable generation (currently 2 MW). In addition, systems may not be sized to produce energy in excess of that required to meet annual on-site energy consumption. Each customer and point of service is eligible to participate in the program multiple times, subject to other program limitations (e.g., maximum per customer and per project incentive limits).

Systems must be new, connected to the grid on the customer side of the meter, meet minimum estimated performance requirements (80% of optimum), and meet all applicable code and utility interconnection requirements. Eligible systems must be covered by an all-inclusive warranty for at least five years from the date of installation.The modules must be new and certified to UL 1703 and inverters must be new and certified to UL 1741. All installations must be performed service providers who meet program eligibility requirements. AC disconnect switches are required as are revenue grade solar meters. Service providers are also subject to ongoing quality assurance standards and are required to attend technical training sessions. Installations may be subject to a variety of inspection and performance monitoring requirements in the short- and long-term. System owners retain title to renewable energy certificates (RECs) produced by their system.

All incentive reservations expire either on six calendar months after the date of acceptance, or November 30, 2013.

Contact program personnel for additional information on applications, incentive eligibility, installer qualifications and other program details.

*Non-residential maximum rebate amounts were $25,000 in 2009, $90,000 in 2010, $17,500 during most of 2011, and increased to $43,750 in October 2011. Non-residential rebates are not available for the 2012 program year.
AEP Texas Central Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility American Electric Power Texas Central Company (AEP-TCC) offers rebates to any customer that installs photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or other buildings. Rebates may be assigned to the customer, a service provider, or a third party.


Rebates


Rebates are offered at a flat rate of $1.20 per watt (W)-DC for residential customers and $1.05 per W-DC for non-residential customers. The maximum rebate is:


  • $12,000 per residential customer (equivalent to a 10 kilowatt (kW) system),
  • $26,250 per non-residential customer (equivalent to a 25 kW system), and
  • $90,000 per service provider or project owner.

The above limits no longer apply after July 1, 2014. Owners of the systems also own all renewable energy credits (RECs) or other environmental credits associated with the project.


The total amount of program funding for 2014 is $180,000 for residential customers and $180,000 for non-residential customers.


PV System Eligibility


Unless used for educational purposes by a school, systems must be at least 1 kW- DC in size to qualify for the rebate. Systems may not be sized to produce energy in excess of that required to meet annual on-site energy consumption. Each customer and point of service is eligible to participate in the program multiple times, subject to other program limitations (e.g., maximum per customer and per project incentive limits).

Systems must be new, connected to the grid on the customer side of the meter, meet minimum estimated performance requirements (80% of optimum), and meet all applicable code and utility interconnection requirements. Eligible systems must be covered by an all-inclusive warranty for at least five years from the date of installation. PV modules must be new and certified to UL 1703, and inverters must be new and certified to UL 1741. All installations must be performed service providers who meet program eligibility requirements. AC disconnect switches and revenue-grade solar meters (provided by the service provider) are required. Installations may be subject to a variety of inspection and performance monitoring requirements in the short- and long-term.
AEP Texas North Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility American Electric Power Texas North Company (AEP-TNC) offers rebates to any customer that installs photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or other buildings. Rebates may be assigned to the customer, a service provider, or a third party.


Rebates


Rebates are offered at a flat rate of $1.20 per watt (W)-DC for residential customers and $1.05 per W-DC for non-residential customers. The maximum rebate is:


  • $12,000 per residential customer (equivalent to a 10 kW system),
  • $26,250 per non-residential customer (equivalent to a 25 kW system), and
  • $81,450 per service provider or project owner.

The above limits no longer apply after July 1, 2014. Owners of the systems also own all renewable energy credits (RECs) or other environmental credits associated with the project.


The total amount of program funding for 2014 is $90,000 for residential customers and $72,900 for non-residential customers.


PV System Eligibility


Unless used for educational purposes by a school, systems must be at least 1 kilowatt (kW)-DC in size to qualify for the rebate. Systems may not be sized to produce energy in excess of that required to meet annual on-site energy consumption. Each customer and point of service is eligible to participate in the program multiple times, subject to other program limitations (e.g., maximum per customer and per project incentive limits).

Systems must be new, connected to the grid on the customer side of the meter, meet minimum estimated performance requirements (80% of optimum), and meet all applicable code and utility interconnection requirements. Eligible systems must be covered by an all-inclusive warranty for at least five years from the date of installation. PV modules must be new and certified to UL 1703, and inverters must be new and certified to UL 1741. All installations must be performed service providers who meet program eligibility requirements. AC disconnect switches and revenue-grade solar meters (provided by the service provider) are required. Installations may be subject to a variety of inspection and performance monitoring requirements in the short- and long-term.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and deliberate shutdown.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and secondary standards for sulfur oxides, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, ozone, hydrocarbons, nitrogen dioxide, lead, and dioxin are listed here.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province Any source that serves an electricity generator with a nameplate capacity equal to or greater than 25 MWe is considered a CO2 budget source for the purpose of these regulations. This section lists monitoring and reporting requirements as well as CO2 thresholds for such sources, and describes the CO2 allowance budget trading program.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations may apply to reciprocating engines, fuel-burning equipment, or waste combusting equipment which are either attached to major stationary sources of NOx or have high potential NOx emissions. Exceptions apply. The regulations require owners or operators of relevant equipment to meet certain emissions limitations, comply with equipment provisions, reduce Nox emissions, and register equipment.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The regulations also require reasonable precautions to be taken to prevent particulate matter from becoming airborne during any activity which might carry such risk (e.g., construction), and describe emissions standards for fuel-burning equipment. Some exemptions are listed.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0% by weight, dry basis) for combustion, as well as for the heat input of any fuel burning equipment (250,000 Btu/hour). These limits may be exceeded provided that the operator demonstrates that actual sulfur emissions do not exceed 1.1 pounds per million Btu of heat input. Some exceptions, including the use of fuels with higher sulfur contents during fuel emergencies, apply. The regulations also contain provisions for fuel analyses, fuel merchants, sulfuric acid plants, sulfur recovery plants, non-ferrous smelters, and sulfite pump mills.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Power Plants and Other Large Stationary Sources of Air Pollution (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations apply to fossil-fuel fired stationary sources which serve a generator with a nameplate capacity of 15 MW or more, or fossil-fuel fired boilers or indirect heat exchangers with a maximum input heat capacity of 250 MMBtu/hr or more. The regulations define allowable average emissions rates for these sources, additional emissions reduction requirements, and sulfur dioxide emissions standards.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province For the purpose of these regulations, a distributed generator is defined as any equipment that converts primary fuel, including fossil fuel and renewable fuel, into electricity or electricity and thermal energy, and has a nameplate capacity less than 15 MW that generates electricity for other than emergency use. Electricity generated may be used either on-site or for sale under an agreement with a utility, other market participant or system operator. The construction or modification of distributed generators may be exempt from new source general permit requirements. These regulations list emissions allowances and certification requirements for distributed generators, as well as information on credit for concurrent emissions reductions.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide end-use energy efficiency, or avoid methane emissions from agricultural management operations are eligible for the award of CO2 offset allowances. Projects are eligible as long as the offset project or CO2 emissions credit retirement is not required by any local, state, or federal law, or regulation, administrative, or judicial order, and the project is not awarded credits or allowances under any other mandatory or voluntary greenhouse gas program by another participating state or carbon market. These regulations describe maximum allocation periods, timing, and monitoring for CO2 offset projects and how to compute allowable carbon offsets.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for hazardous air pollutants and reporting requirements.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Permit to Construct and Operate Stationary Sources (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province Permits are required for the construction or major modification of a stationary source or emission unit. Some exemptions apply. These regulations describe permit requirements, authorized activities prior to permit issuance, and standards for the issuance, modification, revision, or revocation of a permit.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and standards of performance.
Abatement of Air Pollution: Source Monitoring, Record Keeping, and Reporting (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province Equipment that either combusts coal in any amount, or enough gaseous, liquid, or solid fuels to meet the heat and emissions standards defined in these regulations, must be operated with an Opacity Continuous Emissions Monitoring (CEM) system. Some exemptions apply. These regulations describe monitoring and reporting requirements.
Abatement of Air Pollution: The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Nitrogen Oxides (Nox) Ozone Season Trading Program (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations may apply to fossil-fuel fired emission units, and describe nitrogen emission allocations that owners of such units must meet. The regulations also contain provisions for facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures, such as higher building standards or the addition of combined heat and power units.
Accelerate Oklahoma (Oklahoma) Equity Investment State/Province Three new funds that each offer equity and growth investment capital for state-based entrepreneurs, depending on the lifecycle stage of their business, were appropriated through the Oklahoma Commerce Department by the U.S. Treasury Department and are managed by i2E. These funds are expected to attract up to $130 million in concurrent and follow-on private capital in Oklahoma companies that receive investment through Accelerate Oklahoma!
Accidental Release Program (Delaware) Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
State/Province The Delaware Accidental Release Prevention Regulation contains requirements for owners or operators of stationary sources having regulated extremely hazardous substances onsite to develop and implement a risk management program (RMP) that anticipates and minimizes the chances of catastrophic events.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region III approved the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s (DNREC) request to implement and enforce its accidental release prevention program in place of similar federal requirements on August 7, 2001. The Delaware regulation adopts the Federal requirements found in regulation 40 CFR Part 68 with some adjustments and substitutions. Delaware’s regulation includes additional requirements for sources not regulated by the Federal program.

Delaware did not request Federal approval for these more stringent requirements but rather uses State authority under 7 Del. C. Chapter 77 Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act to implement and enforce these requirements.
Acquisition Of Land (Tennessee) Siting and Permitting State/Province Every corporation organized under the laws of any state of the United States and authorized to construct, own, and operate gas or electric plants or both for the purpose of furnishing gas or electricity or both to persons in this state or in this state and elsewhere, or authorized to engage in the business of reducing, generating, and furnishing light, heat, electricity and electrical and mechanical power generated or produced from steam power or water power obtained by a dam or dams across any stream or streams of water, or authorized to store, transport or distribute natural or artificial gas or oil to be used in producing light, heat or mechanical power, for sale to the public generally or to utility corporations for resale to the public generally, and, for any or all of such purposes, authorized to construct and maintain pipelines, is empowered to condemn and take upon paying or securing payment thereof, to purchase or otherwise acquire, such lands and interests in and by whomsoever owned as may be necessary or advisable in the construction, maintenance, and operation of either its gas or electric plants or both, and likewise to acquire the right to use, employ, and divert such water flowing in and running into any stream or watercourse as may be necessary or advisable in the exercise of its charter powers, such lands and interests in lands as may be necessary or advisable for establishing and maintaining its power houses, canals, flumes, conduits, pipelines, reservoirs, ponds, dams, transmission lines and other works, the rights-of-way for lines of poles, towers, wires, and transmission lines through any and all lands between its reservoirs, ponds, dams, power houses and other works and the cities and towns and other points at which its light, heat, water, electricity and electrical and mechanical or gas power may be transmitted, consumed or disposed of, such lands and interests in lands as may be necessary or advisable to place its electric wire, conductors, conduits, ditches, canals, flumes, pipelines, and transmission lines either above or underground; and every such corporation may at any time enter thereon and repair same or when deemed necessary or advisable may place additional equipment, appliances or appurtenances; provided, that such electric wires, conductors, conduits, ditches, canals, flumes, pipelines and transmission lines shall be placed in such manner as to do as little injury to the property of private persons as possible; and provided further, that every such corporation shall make compensation to the owners of the real estate condemned or taken through which its electric wires, conductors, conduits, ditches, canals, flumes, pipelines and transmission lines may be placed. If the owner and the corporation cannot agree upon the amount of compensation which should be paid, the taking shall proceed and the damages or compensation to be paid shall be assessed in the manner provided by title 29, chapter 16.
Administrative Code Title 83, Public Utilities (Illinois) Environmental Regulations
Generating Facility Rate-Making
Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Training/Technical Assistance
State/Province In addition to general rules for utilities, this article states regulations for the protection of underground utilities, promotional practices of electric and gas public utilities construction of electric power and communication lines, standards of service and environmental disclosure. It also states RPS and clean coal standard for alternative retail electric suppliers and utilities operating outside their service areas. It states regulations on net metering, electric interconnection of facilities, standards of service for gas utilities, training programs for natural gas system operating personnel, safety and quality standards for gas transportation and standards of service for water utilities.
Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund State/Territory Ohio's Advanced Energy Fund was originally authorized by the state's 1999 electric restructuring legislation. The Fund supports the Advanced Energy Program, which at different times has provided grants for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects to different economic sectors. Grant and loan funds are awarded through periodic Notices of Funding Availability (NOFAs) which may each focus on specific technologies or economic sectors.

The Fund is administered by the Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA) and was originally replenished through a uniform fee on the electric bills of customers of the state's four investor-owned utilities (American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy). The fee amount was determined by dividing an aggregate revenue target for a given year -- as determined by the ODSA -- by the number of customers of electric distribution utilities in Ohio during the previous year. The maximum aggregate revenue target for each year through 2005 was $15 million; the maximum target for each year after 2005 was $5 million. Fee collections began January 1, 2006, and ended January 1, 2011.

Additional income may accrue to the Advanced Energy Fund from alternative compliance payments (ACPs) associated with Ohio's Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard or Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard, enacted in July 2008.

In 2012, S.B. 315 transferred funds from the Advanced Energy Research and Development Taxable Fund and the Advanced Energy Research and Development Fund to the Advanced Energy Fund. In addition, it allowed the Advanced Energy Fund to award loans in addition to grants.

Ohio's 1999 restructuring legislation also created the Public Benefits Advisory Board, a multi-stakeholder panel that assists the ODSA in administering the Fund, and the Universal Service Board. The ODSA collaborates with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to design and develop energy programs. Incentives are available to residents, low-income housing developers, businesses, industry, local governments, schools, nonprofits and farms. Participation in the Fund by electric cooperatives and municipal utilities is voluntary. Because no electric cooperatives or municipal utilities are participating, customers of these utilities are not eligible for Fund incentives. For information on current opportunities please consult the program web site.
Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program (Ohio) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory This bond-funded program creates an Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Fund that is administered through a public process previously managed by the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA). Beginning in 2012, the program is managed by the Ohio Development Services Agency. The Program will award funds to a portfolio of advanced energy projects. These projects will serve to attract new investment to Ohio, build upon Ohio's manufacturing strength, advance energy technology development toward commercialization and prepare Ohio's workforce for the future. Detailed definitions of eligible advanced energy projects and renewable energy resources may be found in ORC 3706.25.

Funding Categories

The $150 million advanced energy money (over three years) seeks to increase the development, production and use of advanced energy technologies in the state, and is divided in the following manner:
• $66 million for clean coal technology projects administered through OAQDA’s Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) (reviewed by the Technical Advisory Committee and approved by OAQDA); and
• $84 million for non-coal-related projects in three $28 million annual appropriations administered by OAQDA (reviewed by the Development Finance Advisory Council, approved by the OAQDA and brought before Controlling Board for final approval).



Project Financing
OAQDA provides financing via conduit bonds for a broad range of projects involving the purchase, construction and/or installation of air quality facilities by businesses and other entities. It is important to note that this program provides forgivable and non-forgivable loans ONLY. The Ohio Constitution does not allow grant awards for this program. All OAQDA financing instruments are conduit bonds that:
• May be exempt or non-exempt from federal income tax.
• Enjoy 100 percent lifetime exemption from state income tax, real property, sales and use taxes.
• Are based on a credit analysis of the benefiting party and must identify the revenue sources that cover principal and interest payment.

As a general guideline, awards will range from approximately $50,000 to $2 million, based on size and scope and on jobs, investments and other impacts and may be considered for higher awards if outstanding potential value is demonstrated. Additionally, five percent of the fund may be set aside for small awards (generally in the range of $50,000) to support disruptive technologies with significant potential for success, even if they are in earlier stages of development. For more information about OAQDA project financing, please visit the OAQDA web site.

For highly qualified applicants, loans could be structured a number of ways including below market rates, subordinate collateralized positions with participating financial institutions and/or varying principal payments for a specified period of time. It should be noted that projects receiving assistance through this program may be subject to Ohio prevailing wage requirements. Applicants should review these guidelines carefully.
Advanced Energy Tax Credit (Corporate) (New Mexico) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory A taxpayer that holds an interest in a qualified generating facility located in New Mexico and that files a New Mexico corporate income tax return may claim an advanced energy corporate income tax credit in an amount equal to 6% of the eligible generation plant costs of a qualified generating facilities (see § 7-2A-25).


“Eligible generation plant costs" means expenditures for the development and construction of a qualified generating facility, including costs related to permitting, site characterization and assessment, engineering, design, and site and equipment acquisition.


Eligible Technologies


"Qualified generating facility" means a facility that begins construction not later than December 31, 2015, and includes, among other technologies:


  • a solar thermal electric generating facility that begins construction on or after July 1, 2007 and that may include an associated renewable energy storage facility;
  • a solar photovoltaic electric generating facility that begins construction on or after July 1, 2009 and that may include an associated renewable energy storage facility;
  • a geothermal electric generating facility that begins construction on or after July 1, 2009; and
  • a recycled energy project if that facility begins construction on or after July 1, 2007.

Combined Reporting


Any balance of the advanced energy corporate income tax credit that the taxpayer is approved to claim may be claimed by the taxpayer as an “advanced energy combined reporting tax credit” (see § 7-9G-2). A taxpayer granted approval to claim an advanced energy combined reporting tax credit may claim an amount of available credit against the taxpayer's gross receipts tax, compensating tax or withholding tax due to the state.


Carryover


Any unused credit may be carried forward for up to 10 years.


Process


The aggregate amount of all advanced energy tax credits that may be claimed with respect to a qualified generating facility cannot exceed $60,000,000. In order to claim the tax credit, developers must obtain a certificate of eligibility from the New Mexico Environment Department and submit the certificate to the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department.


Click here for more information, including forms to apply for the tax credit.
Advanced Energy Tax Credit (Personal) (New Mexico) Personal Tax Credit State/Territory A taxpayer who holds an interest in a qualified generating facility located in New Mexico and who files an individual New Mexico income tax return may claim an advanced energy income tax credit in an amount equal to 6% of the eligible generation plant costs of a qualified generating facility.


“Eligible generation plant costs" means expenditures for the development and construction of a qualified generating facility, including costs related to permitting, site characterization and assessment, engineering, design, and site and equipment acquisition.


Eligible Technologies


"Qualified generating facility" means a facility that begins construction not later than December 31, 2015, and includes, among other technologies:


  • a solar thermal electric generating facility that begins construction on or after July 1, 2007 and that may include an associated renewable energy storage facility;
  • a solar photovoltaic electric generating facility that begins construction on or after July 1, 2009 and that may include an associated renewable energy storage facility;
  • a geothermal electric generating facility that begins construction on or after July 1, 2009; and
  • a recycled energy project if that facility begins construction on or after July 1, 2007.

Carryover


Any unused credit may be carried forward for up to 10 years.


Process


The aggregate amount of all advanced energy tax credits that may be claimed with respect to a qualified generating facility cannot exceed $60,000,000.


In order to claim the tax credit, an entity that holds an interest in a qualified generating facility may request a certificate of eligibility from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). To claim the advanced energy income tax credit, a taxpayer must submit with the taxpayer's New Mexico income tax return a certificate of eligibility from the NMED stating that the taxpayer may be eligible for advanced energy tax credits.


Click here for more information, including forms to apply for the tax credit.
Advantage Jobs Incentive Program (Mississippi) Rebate Program State/Province The Advantage Jobs Incentive Program is a rebate program designed to encourage businesses that create new quality jobs to locate in the state. Jobs must meet or exceed the average annual wage of the state or the county in which the company locates, whichever is lower. The amount available for rebate is the lesser of the qualified Mississippi personal income tax withheld or a legal maximum of 4% of applicable wage. Once the amount available is determined, the eligible company will receive 90% if the annual average wage is at least 110% of the lesser of the average county or state wage.
Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) (New Mexico) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory House Bill 171 of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may adopt additional specifications for agricultural biomass through a rule making process. The credit is effective for biomass originating between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2020. The credit is worth $5 per wet ton. Eligible projects must apply to the Taxation and Revenue Department for the credit. The Taxation and Revenue Department is authorized to distribute $5 million in these credits annually and will award a qualification document to eligible projects on a first come, first served basis. The qualification document may be submitted by the taxpayer with that taxpayer's corporate income tax return or may be sold, exchanged or otherwise transferred to another taxpayer. The taxpayers involved in a credit transfer must notify the Taxation and Revenue Department within ten days of the sale, exchange or transfer. If a tax payer cannot claim all the credit they have been awarded for the year, they may carry forward any unused credit for a maximum of four consecutive years.
Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) (New Mexico) Personal Tax Credit State/Territory House Bill 171 of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may adopt additional specifications for agricultural biomass through a rule making process. The credit is effective for biomass originating between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2020. The credit is worth $5 per wet ton. Eligible projects must apply to the Taxation and Revenue Department for the credit. The Taxation and Revenue Department is authorized to distribute $5 million in these credits annually and will award a qualification document to eligible projects on a first come, first served basis. The qualification document may be submitted by the taxpayer with that taxpayer's personal income tax return or may be sold, exchanged or otherwise transferred to another taxpayer. The taxpayers involved in a credit transfer must notify the Taxation and Revenue Department within ten days of the sale, exchange or transfer. If a tax payer cannot claim all the credit they have been awarded for the year, they may carry forward any unused credit for a maximum of four consecutive years.
Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) Grant Program State/Province This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to a qualified biomass facility. The Texas Department of Agriculture administers the program, and provides quarterly rebates to biomass facilities for the grant monies paid out throughout the year to biomass suppliers. The agricultural biomass and landfill diversion incentive program is available to farmers, loggers, diverters, and renewable biomass aggregators and bio-coal fuel producers who provide qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass debris to facilities that use biomass to generate electric energy. The law was designed to promote economic development, encourage the use of renewable sources in the generation of electric energy, reduce air pollution, and divert waste from landfills.
Agricultural Improvement Loan Program (Minnesota) State Loan Program State/Territory The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for improvements or additions to permanent agricultural facilities. In 1995, wind-energy systems with a maximum capacity of 1 megawatt (MW) became eligible for the program.

Like Minnesota's Stock Loan Program, this is a "participation loan," where loans are made by individual financial institutions working with the RFA. The RFA has a Master Participation Agreement with over 400 financial institutions throughout the state; this agreement governs the responsibilities of the various parties in such participation loans. RFA participation is limited to 45% of the principal amount of the loan or $300,000, whichever is less. Terms for the remainder of the loan are negotiated between the participant and the lender.

The borrower must be a Minnesota resident, a Minnesota domestic family-farm corporation or a family-farm partnership. The borrower (or one of the borrowers) must be the principal operator of the farm. The borrower may not have a total net worth exceeding $444,000 (indexed for inflation). Applicants are required to pay a non-refundable $50 application processing fee.
Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contiminants (Mississippi) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Air Emission Regulation for the Prevention, Abatement and Control of Air Contaminants is relevant to all ongoing and planned developments in Mississippi. The Regulation sets the maximum amount of permitted emissions of particulate matter from all activities. No person shall cause, permit or allow the emission smoke from a point source into the open air from any manufacturing, industrial, commercial or waste disposal process which exceeds 40% opacity unless it is a Startup operation, which may produce emissions exceeding 40% opacity for up to 15 minutes per startup in any one hour and not exceed 3 startups per day. No person shall cause, allow, or permit the discharge of any point source or emissions, which will obscure someone's view by 40%.

For fossil fuel burning the maximum permissible emission of ash and/or particulate matter shall be limited to less than .6 pounds per million BTU for installations less than 10 million BTU per hour heat. For installations equal or greater than 10 million BTU per hour heat input shall not exceed the rate of E = 0.8808 * I-0.1667 where E is the emission rate in pounds per million BTU per hour heat input and I is the heat input in millions of BTU per hour. Emissions from installations equal to or greater than 10,000 million BTU per hour heat input shall not exceed .19 pounds per million BTU per hour heat input. Fuel burning operations utilizing a mixture of combustibles with fossil fuels to produce steam or heat water or any other heat transfer medium through indirect means may be allowed emission rates up to .30 grains per standard dry cubic foot.

The amount of sulfur dioxide emissions from fuel burning shall not exceed 4.8 pounds per million BTU heat input. The maximum sulfur dioxide from any fuel-burning unit whose generation capacity is less than 250 million BTU per hours 2.4 pounds per million BTU heat input.
Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act (Mississippi) Climate Policies
Environmental Regulations
State/Province The Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purpose of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act make the state Title V permitting program (Permit Regulations for the Construction and/or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment) consistent with the federal requirements by including the EPA’s Green House Gas Emission standards. Green House Gasses are: Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. These shall not be subject to regulation unless, as of July 1, 2011 the Green House Gas emissions are at a stationary source emitting or potentially emitting 100,000 tons per year of co2 equivalent emissions (calculated by multiplying the mass amount of emissions, for each of the 6 Green House Gasses, by the gas's associated global warming potential found in table A-1 to Subpart A of 40 CFR part 98- Global Warming Potentials). Prior to July 21, 2014 the mass of the carbon dioxide shall not include carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the combustion or decomposition of non-fossilized and biodegradable organic material originating from plants, animals, or microorganisms.
Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans and/or grants to projects aimed at reducing air emissions.
Air Emissions Trading Program/Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (New Hampshire) Climate Policies State/Province The New Hampshire Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative is a carbon dioxide emissions budget trading program. The program includes a statewide annual CO2 budget allowance of 8,620,460 tons between 2009 and 2014; beginning in 2015 and ending in 2018, the budget shall decline, resulting in a 10 percent total reduction from the initial budget. The program is designed to stabilize, then reduce, CO2 emissions from CO2 budget sources within the state in an economically efficient manner. The program is designed to comply with the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, to which New Hampshire is signatory.
Air Permits, Licenses, Certifications (Maine) Siting and Permitting State/Province This program regulates and limits air emissions from a variety of sources within Maine through a statewide permitting program. Separate regulations exist for limiting emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter (PM), and carbon monoxide (CO) from smaller-scale electricity generating resources. Affected electricity generating resources are non-mobile generators having a capacity equal to or greater than 50 kilowatts installed on or after January 1, 2005.
Air Permitting for Stationary Sources (New Hampshire) Environmental Regulations State/Province The permitting system implements the permitting requirements of RSA 125-C and 125-I to regulate the operation and modification of new and existing stationary sources, area sources, and devices to maintain ambient air quality standards and ambient air limits for regulated toxic pollutants.
Air Pollution (Illinois) Environmental Regulations State/Province This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.
Air Pollution - Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010, 2013, and 2020 that apply to different types of facilities. By 2020, all facilities are required to comply with the law.

The first phase of the law, which started in 2010, requires all fossil fuel power generating facilities - excluding those less than 25 MW in capacity - to comply with the regulations. Coal-fired plants are included in that definition. Other coal product manufacturing facilities are required to comply by the 2013 phase. Also included in the 2013 phase are waste treatment and disposal facilities, which includes biomass and biogas facilities.

The law sets the standards for dispersion models to assess compliance, as well as contaminant limits. Most of the standards developed under the law are based on the ministry's Ambient Air Quality Criteria (AAQCs). AAQCs are effect-based concentration levels with variable averaging times (e.g., 24 hours, 1 hour, 10 minutes). The effects considered include health, odor, vegetation, soiling, visibility and corrosion.
Air Pollution Control (Indiana) Environmental Regulations State/Province The mission of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management's Office of Air Quality implements federal and state regulations to protect human health and the environment while allowing the environmentally sound operations of industrial, agricultural, commercial and governmental activities vital to a prosperous economy. The mission of the Office is to assure that the air in Indiana meets the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for each of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the federal Clean Air Act (CAA); to provide timely, quality air permits without unnecessary requirements and to verify compliance with applicable state and federal air pollution laws and regulations.

OAQ is comprised of five branches, each with specific air quality responsibilities. Most branches in OAQ are divided into sections that handle certain aspects of branch responsibilities.

The Office implements and enforces rules established by the Environmental Rules Board, which was created by the 2012 Indiana General Assembly and consolidates the Air Pollution Control Board, Water Pollution Control Board, and Solid Waste Management Board.
Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province This rule requires an annual report from a commercial, industrial, or governmental source of emission of an air contaminant if, in the judgment of the Department, information on the quantity and composition of an air contaminant emitted from the source is considered by the Department as necessary for the proper management of the air resources. In addition, other state rules and federal statutes and regulations require sources to report air emissions if certain conditions are met. The Air Quality Division (AQD) has outlined the general criteria that are used to determine if a source must report.
Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a statewide air pollution control program, to promulgate regulations related to air pollution control, grant necessary permits to air pollution sources, and establish state ambient air quality standards. Air quality rules or standards pertaining to coal conversion facilities, petroleum refineries, or oil and gas production and processing facilities may not be more stringent than federal standards, barring favorable results of stringent cost-benefit impact analyses. Additionally, section 23-25-11 specifically addresses the regulation of odors, including those resulting from manure management methods.
Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Environmental Regulations State/Province This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and the significant deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes of areas. It is required for potential sources of air contaminants to register with the Division. Facilities that emit air contaminants have to file an emission inventory and pay annual operating fees.

The article also lays out rules about permits for operation and construction of facilities, states visibility standards and excess emissions reporting standards. It also provides provisions for open burning, incinerators, municipal waste combustors and for the control of emission of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds.

The rules have provisions for permitting, as well as specific provisions for clean coal technology.
Air Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) Environmental Regulations State/Province The purpose of this law is to provide for a coordinated statewide program of air pollution prevention, abatement and control; to facilitate cooperation across jurisdictional lines in dealing with problems of air pollution not confined within single jurisdictions; to assure the economic competitiveness of the state by providing for the timely processing of permit applications and other authorizations under this article; and to provide a framework within which all values may be balanced in the public interest.
Air Pollution Control Board (Virginia) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Air Division in the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Air Pollution Control Board work together to control present and future sources of air pollution. The Division's core responsibilities include: (a) Developing and implementing programs designed to ensure that Virginia meets national air quality standards; (b) Regulating the emission of air pollutants from industries and facilities by issuing and ensuring compliance with permits that set limits that protect public health; (c) Monitoring Virginia's air quality; (d) Investigating complaints and violations of Virginia's air quality laws; and (e) Developing state rules governing air quality standards. The Division also provides assistance to small businesses to help them to meet emissions standards.
Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive
Sales Tax Incentive
State/Province An application for a pollution control tax exemption certificate shall be filed with the state tax commission in a manner and in a form as prescribed by the state tax commission. The application shall contain plans and specifications of the facility, including all materials incorporated or to be incorporated in the facility and a descriptive list of all equipment acquired or to be acquired by the applicant for the purpose of pollution control, together with the proposed operating procedure for the control facility.

For the purposes of this tax exemption, “facility” means machinery, equipment, structures, or any part or accessories of machinery, equipment, or structures, installed or acquired for the primary purpose of controlling or disposing of air pollution that if released would render the air harmful or inimical to the public health or to property within this state. Facility includes an incinerator equipped with a pollution abatement device in effective operation.

For the period subsequent to the effective date of the certificate and continuing as long as the certificate is in force, a facility covered by the certificate is exempt from real and personal property taxes imposed under the general property tax act Tangible personal property purchased and installed as a component part of the facility is exempt from sales tax.
Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Environmental Regulations
Fees
State/Province Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10 tons per year, or any combination of hazardous air pollutants greater than 25 tons per year, must submit, in a form and manner prescribed by the director, a fee emission report that quantifies the actual emission data for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, and lead. The owner or operator of a facility shall pay fees on the facility's actual emissions. The fee for reporting year 2011 is $45.55/ton.
Air Pollution Control Permit to Construct and Permit to Operate (Vermont) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Air Pollution Control Division of the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation requires a permit for electrical power generation facilities that are air contaminant sources. An Air Pollution Control Permit to Construct may be required prior to commencing construction of the facility. Fuel-burning boilers, coal, oil, or natural gas-fired boiler steam generators require a permit. Gas turbines, as well as simple cycle combined with heat recovery steam turbine require permits. Projects that are in Green Mountain Power's Cow Power program that comply with specific standard requirements do not require a permit.
Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Siting and Permitting State/Province This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution emergencies, rules for open burning and incineration of commercial and industrial waste. A separate chapter lists limits for the control of particulate emissions and fuel burning equipment. Standards for sulfur compound emissions, volatile organic compound emissions, carbon monoxide emissions, nitrogen oxide emissions are also stated.

Information is provided on permits- in general, any person building, erecting, altering, or replacing any article, machine, equipment, or other contrivance, the use of which may cause the issuance of or an increase in the issuance of air contaminants or the use of which may eliminate or reduce or control the issuance of air contaminants, shall submit an application for an Air Permit at least 10 days prior to construction. The rule also states gas emission standards for municipal solid waste landfills.

The Air Division has primary jurisdiction over all air emission sources within the State, except those emission sources located within Jefferson County or the City of Huntsville. The Air Pollution Control Programs in these areas are administered by the Jefferson County Department of Health (www.jcdh.org) and the City of Huntsville Department of Natural Resources (www.hsvcity.com/NatRes/), respectively. Air emission sources in these areas should contact these agencies for information regarding applicable regulations and permitting requirements.
Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the state, permitting businesses and facilities that emit air pollution, and ensuring compliance with the state laws and rules. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to air quality and air pollution sources.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1 - Visible Emissions (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour which is greater than or equal to 20 percent opacity.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Siting and Permitting State/Province Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels for the relevant contaminant(s), as specified in Table I of these regulations.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which may cause any emissions of particulate matter into the atmosphere. The regulations contain a table to aid emissions calculations.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 43 - General Permits for Smaller-Scale Electric Generation Facilities (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province This rule applies to any generator that: (a) has a heat input capacity of 350,000 Btus or more per hour or, in the case of internal combustion engines, is 50 HP or larger; and, (b) is not subject to or would not cause a facility to be subject to the RI major source permitting requirements. Generators whose engines are non-road engines will be exempt from compliance with the requirements of this rule. The regulations describe the permitting process, emissions standards, and monitoring requirements that must be met by these systems.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 & 47 - CO2 Budget Trading Program & Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe CO2 allowance allocations and transfers necessary to meet emissions standards.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province Repealed in 2014. These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum design heat input greater than 250 mmBtu/hr. Units that possess federally enforceable permits may be exempt from these regulations.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding the handling, transportation, mining, quarrying, storing, or utilizing of materials in a way that will cause airborne particulate matter to travel beyond the property line of the emission source without taking adequate precautions to prevent particulate matter from becoming airborne. The regulations apply to activities including the construction, demolition, or renovation of buildings, bridges, or other structures; material stockpiles and earth moving activities, including land clearing; stationary sources whose activities involve the handling of materials which cause airborne particulate matter; exterior surface preparation or resurfacing operations; and others.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor with audio alarm. The devices will be calibrated to sound the alarm at 20 percent opacity and operate continuously during fuel combustion. Data from the monitoring system will be reported to the Department of Environmental Management.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or cause damage to property or which unreasonably interferes with the enjoyment of life and property. The criteria for determining compliance is listed in the regulations, and is based on other air pollution and ambient air standards.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9 - Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.
Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) Plan Requirements for high NOx emitters.
Air Pollution Control Rules (West Virginia) Siting and Permitting State/Province The listed rules were enacted as directed by the Air Pollution Control Act. Together, these rules guide the monitoring, permitting and compliance enforcement of air quality in the state.
Air Pollution Controls (Wisconsin) Environmental Regulations State/Province Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions regulations for hazardous and non-hazardous pollutants.
Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and must take immediate or reasonable steps to minimize these emissions. The regulations accompanying this legislation list ambient air quality standards for Minnesota, as well as emissions standards for stationary sources.
Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Environmental Regulations State/Province Nova Scotia Environment is responsible for monitoring the air quality in the province, as well as administering fines and permits relating to air quality. The Air Quality Regulations state specific rules about different types of air pollutants.

Facilities that release emissions in excess of 90 tonnes of sulphur dioxide per year in the aggregate must, not later than February 15 of each year or as otherwise directed by an Administrator, in a form specified by the Administrator, submit a report to the Minister or an Administrator on the sulphur throughput, noting the fuel usage, sulphur content and corresponding sulphur dioxide emissions for the previous calendar year from each facility owned or operated by, or under the responsibility of, the person.

Before ownership of a fossil fuel-fired thermal power generating station (which includes natural gas and coal) is transferred, the apportioning of its emission allocation and associated monitoring and reporting requirements must be approved in writing by the Administrator.

Mercury emissions are also covered.
Air Quality Approvals and Permits (New Brunswick, Canada) Environmental Regulations
Fees
State/Province An air quality approval is required by owners or operators of a source of air contaminants for the construction, operation, or modification of the source. This applies to most existing or new industrial and some commercial or institutional facilities.

Anyone constructing, operating, and/or modifying what is considered by the department to be a source of contaminants. This applies to most existing or new industrial and some commercial or institutional facilities in New Brunswick.

The following are the major services that are provided through the Approvals program: Application Review, Approval Development and Issuance, and Compliance Verification. The actual time spent on providing these services increases with facility complexity and associated environmental risk. In keeping with this, the annual fees for Air Quality Approvals are broken into five classes that include Class 1A, 1B, 2, 3, and 4 facilities. A Class 1A facility is considered the most complex and requires the most regulatory effort, and therefore has the highest annual fee. Conversely, a Class 4 facility is considered the least complex and requires the lowest associated amount of regulatory effort, and therefore has the lowest annual fee.
Air Quality Control Act (New Mexico) Environmental Regulations State/Province This act states the duties and powers of the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board and local agencies. It also states the enforcement of regulations, permit fees, inspection of facilities and penalties.
Air Quality Permits (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Environmental Regulations State/Province Companies that operate any of the following:

- fuel burning equipment (utilities and non-utility boilers), - incinerators, and - industrial sources (e.g., asphalt plants)

must get a permit to operate under the Air Quality Regulations of the Environmental Protection Act.
Air Quality Regulations (Pennsylvania) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Air Quality Program regulates more than 70,000 inspection points such as pollution control devices, boilers, fuels and paints at 3,650 facilities that produce air pollution in Pennsylvania. The program administers the rules and regulations of the Pennsylvania Air Pollution Control Act and the Pennsylvania Code. The Code has specific regulations for coal-fired combustion units, natural gas, and other potential pollutants.
Air Quality Rules (North Carolina) Environmental Regulations State/Province This is a comprehensive air quality rule for North Carolina that includes ambient air quality standards, emission control standards, monitoring and reporting requirements, and permitting procedures. The rule provides emission limits for sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, etc., and contains guidelines for the control of the emissions from incinerators, emission standards for municipal solid waste landfills and guidelines for open burning and permit requirements.
Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational requirements for facilities that may contribute to air emissions. General air quality standards and standards for specific contaminants are listed. The regulations list activities that are exempt from these permitting requirements and identify emissions standards for specific sources. The regulations also describe several budget trading programs active in New York State, including programs for NOx, SO2, and CO2 trading.
Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives (Ohio) Other Incentive State/Territory The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) provides assistance for new air quality projects in Ohio, for both small and large businesses. For qualifying projects, the OAQDA also projects tax benefits.

For qualifying projects, the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) can provide a 100 percent exemption from the tangible personal property tax (on property purchased as part of an air quality project), real property tax (on real property comprising an air quality project), a portion of the corporate franchise tax (under the net worth base calculation), sales and use tax (on the personal property purchased specifically for the air quality project only) as long as the bond or note issued by OAQDA is outstanding. Furthermore, interest income on bonds and notes issued by OAQDA is exempt from state income tax (and may be exempt in certain cases from the federal income tax).

Qualifying air quality facilities, which can be financed through the OAQDA, include:

1. Projects that modify or replace property, processes, devices, equipment, or structures that removes (or otherwise reduces, stores) air pollution and air contaminants.

2. Any property used for the collection, storage, treatment, processing, or final disposal of solid waste resulting from an air pollution control process.

3. Any energy efficiency or conservation project

4. Any project that uses renewable or biomass resources, including ethanol and other biofuel.
Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Environmental Regulations State/Province This Act gives the Environmental Management Commission the authority to establish emission control requirements, by rule or regulation, as may be necessary to prevent, abate or control air pollution. Such requirements may be for the state as a whole or may vary from area to area, as may be appropriate, to facilitate accomplishment of the purposes of this chapter and in order to take account of varying local conditions.

The Commission can prohibit the construction, installation, modification or use of any equipment, device or other article which it finds may cause or contribute to air pollution or which is intended primarily to prevent or control the emission of air pollutants unless a permit has been obtained from the Director. Any duly authorized officer, employee or representative of the department may enter and inspect any property, premises or place on, or at, which an air contaminant source is located or is being constructed, installed or established, at any reasonable time, for the purpose of ascertaining the state of compliance with this chapter and rules and regulations.

The Commission may require the owner or operator of any air contaminant source to establish and maintain records, make reports, install, use and maintain monitoring equipment or methods, sample emissions in accordance with methods, at locations, intervals and procedures as the Commission requires, and provide other information as the commission reasonably may require.
Alabama Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama) Environmental Regulations State/Province This article establishes a program, to be implemented, maintained, and administered by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, to encourage the voluntary cleanup and the reuse and redevelopment of environmentally contaminated properties. The article states criteria for applicant participation and property qualification in the voluntary cleanup program.
Alabama Property Tax Exemptions (Alabama) Property Tax Incentive State/Province Alabama Property Tax Exemptions are offered through the Alabama Department of Revenue. Relevant exemptions to energy generation facilities are abatements for air and water pollution control device and industrial purposes. There is no minimum amount of investment required to qualify a new project for abatement. An addition, however, to an existing project requires an investment of the lesser of 30% of the original cost of the existing facility or $2 million.
Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) Environmental Regulations State/Province The department, acting through the commission, is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations governing underground storage tanks and is authorized to seek the approval of the United States Environmental Protection Agency to operate the state underground storage tank program in lieu of the federal program. In addition to specific authorities provided by this chapter, the department is authorized, acting through the commission, to adopt any rules or regulations that are mandatory requirements for approval of the State Underground Storage Tank Regulatory Program by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Adoption of rules and regulations governing underground storage tanks shall not occur prior to adoption by the United States Environmental Protection Agency of regulations establishing the federal program. To provide revenue for regulation, the department shall, beginning October 1, 1988, collect a tank regulation fee of not less than $15.00 and not more than $30.00 per regulated tank per year. This fee shall be collected in lieu of a permit or certification fee
AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program State/Territory The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) offers an energy efficiency and renewable energy revolving loan fund called AlabamaSAVES. The funds are available to businesses and industries located in Alabama for retrofitting existing facilities. A variety of technologies are eligible; see the program technical guide for full details.


In order to apply, interested parties must first contact an AlabamaSaves representative. Upon receiving and submitting the necessary paperwork, a consultation on financing and next steps is scheduled. The Loan Application formalizes the request for a subsidy or direct loan. The process requires that an energy assessment, defining the project and estimated energy savings impact, be submitted and reviewed to ensure a simple payback of 10 years or better.


The program operates as a revolving loan program where the fund is replenished by interest and principal repayments made on prior loans and as a loan subsidy program enabling low cost loans from private lenders through credit enhancements – interest rate buydowns and loan loss reserves. The fund was initially capitalized with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding. Please see the program web site for additional information and program materials.
Allegany County Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local This ordinance sets requirements for industrial wind energy conversion systems. These requirements include minimum separation distances, setback requirements, electromagnetic interference analysis (EIA), the establishment of bonds for the purposes of decommissioning and groundwater protection, as well as the establishment of supplemental safety provisions.
Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority (Virginia) Enterprise Zone
Industry Recruitment/Support
Loan Program
Public Benefits Fund
Local The Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority was created to encourage economic development in the Alleghany Highlands. The Authority provides financial support for the purchase of real estate, construction of buildings for sale or lease, installation of utilities and any other support improvements it deems necessary, including flood control dams, and for direct loans and grants to private for-profit basic employers. The Authority also administers a business incubator program in the region. The Alleghany Highlands are also designated as an Enterprise Zone by the Commonwealth of Virginia, so businesses locating within the region can take advantage of other state financial incentives. The Authority has a specific section concerning the development of wind energy in the Alleghany highlands, including a listing of potential development properties.
Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) Utility Rebate Program Utility The Alliant Energy Renewable Cash-Back Rewards program offers rebates for solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, renewable biomass, and anaerobic digesters. Businesses and farms that are Alliant Energy electric customers qualify for these rebates. Note that the above web site directs to the business incentives; the farm incentives are the same rate and can be found here. In order to apply for the program, customers must first use the online self-assessment tool. Alliant Energy will then contact customers to schedule an energy efficiency audit and a site assessment to determine the incentive level and the renewable energy potential. Customers can receive a higher "Energy Efficient" rebate rate for wind and solar PV if the business or farm meets certain energy efficient objectives, as determined by an energy efficiency audit.


The solar and wind rebates are based on the lesser of either the estimated first year output in kilowatt hours (kWh) or the optimal annual energy usage of the facility in kWh as follows:


  • Standard PV: The lesser of
    • estimated first year output in kWh x $0.50 or
    • optimal annual energy usage of the facility in kWh x .75 x $0.50
  • Energy Efficient PV: The lesser of
    • estimated first year output in kWh x $1.00 or
    • optimal annual energy usage of the facility in kWh x .75 x $1.00
  • Standard Wind: The lesser of
    • estimated first year output in kWh x $0.25 or
    • optimal annual energy usage of the facility in kWh x .75 x $0.25
  • Energy Efficient Wind: The lesser of
    • estimated first year output in kWh x $0.75 or
    • optimal annual energy usage of the facility in kWh x .75 x $0.75
Businesses can also receive rebates through the Energy Efficiency Rebate Program or the Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Rebate Program in order to meet the energy efficient objectives.
Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable Energy Rebates Utility Rebate Program Utility The Alliant Energy Renewable Cash-Back Rewards program offers its electricity customers rebates for solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, and solar thermal water heating systems. Natural gas customers qualify for the solar thermal water heating reward.

In order to apply for the program, customers must first use the online self-assessment tool. Alliant Energy will then contact customers to schedule a Home Performance with Energy Star audit and a site assessment to determine renewable energy potential. Projects must be placed in service within one calendar year from the date of the online screening.
Customers can receive a higher "Energy Efficient" rebate rate for wind and solar PV if the homeowner meets one of the following criteria:

  1. The homeowner installs all upgrades with a five-year or less payback period as identified in a Home Performance With Energy Star
  2. The home passes the Alliant Energy's New Home Construction
  3. The homeowners annual electricity usage is less than 6,500 kWh


Rebate rates are as follows:

  • Energy Efficient Solar PV: $1.25/kWh x estimated first year output
  • Standard Solar PV: $0.75/kWh x estimated first year output
  • Energy Efficient Wind: $0.75/kWh x estimated first year output
  • Standard Wind: $0.25/kWh x estimated first year output
  • Solar Thermal Water Heater (electric): $0.35 x annual kWh savings
  • Solar Thermal Water Heater (natural gas): $2.50 x annual therm savings
Alteration of Terrain Permits (New Hampshire) Siting and Permitting State/Province This permit is required whenever a project proposes to disturb more than 100,000 square feet of contiguous terrain (50,000 square feet if any portion of project is within protected shoreland), or disturbs an area having a grade of 25 percent or greater within 50 feet of any surface water. Permitting program applies to earth moving operations, such as commercial, industrial, and residential developments. The requirements protect groundwater supplies by controlling erosion and managing stormwater runoff from developed areas.
Alternate Energy Development Fund (Kentucky) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province Kentucky Administrative Regulations Title 115 chapter 2 establishes the alternative energy development fund under the authority of the Kentucky Energy Cabinet. The goal for the use of the alternate energy development fund is to encourage and promote the development, implementation and construction of alternate energy projects in the Commonwealth. Funding cycle(s) during which applications will be received for the program will be announced. A deadline for proposals will be established and advertised through appropriate newspapers to effect statewide coverage. Interested parties will be notified about the program upon request to the Kentucky Energy Cabinet. In addition workshops to explain the program are anticipated and will be held as appropriate. More than one (1) funding cycle is anticipated, but this will be dependent upon the continued existence of available funds for the program. Each loan and/or grant proposal must involve the research, development, implementation, operation and/or construction of an alternate energy project. Also, projects of renewable resources must be designated within one (1) or more of other categories: Biomass, Geothermal, Hydropower, Solar and Wind. Proposals must detail all costs and financing information. To insure proper use of funds, successful applicants will be held accountable for project expenses in a manner acceptable to the Kentucky Energy Cabinet. Records, receipts, and vouchers, etc., for the selected projects are subject to audit. Documentation of reliable credit must be furnished with all loan applications. A separate bank account for each project is required. A grant or loan recipient will be required to submit to the Kentucky Energy Cabinet quarterly reports on projects in progress and a final report within three (3) months after completion of the project. Quarterly reports following a format designated by the Kentucky Energy Cabinet will show progress of project, schedule, and financial activities. The final report will emphasize results and other activities associated with the project. The Kentucky Energy Cabinet anticipates that new technology and considerable valuable data will be generated through the use of program funds. The cabinet encourages inventors to seek patents for and to commercialize their inventions and technology. The cabinet will not interfere with an inventor seeking patent protection, but the inventor will be responsible for filing and prosecution of any patent applications. The Kentucky Energy Cabinet reserves the right to use and disseminate all information, data, and technology derived from use of program funds to the extent such information and technology is not protected by any claim of confidentiality. Any data which are released from confidential status may then be used or disseminated by the cabinet in any way it deems appropriate.
Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province This legislation aims to encourage the development of alternative energy, cogeneration, and small hydropower facilities. The statute requires utilities to enter into long-term contracts with these facilities and provide supplemental or backup power to such facilities at reasonable rates, to be established by the Utility Regulatory Commission. Some exceptions apply.
Alternate Energy Revolving Loan Program (Iowa) State Loan Program State/Territory The Alternate Energy Revolving Loan Program (AERLP), administered by the Iowa Energy Center, provides low-interest loans to individuals and organizations that seek to build renewable energy production facilities in Iowa.


Successful applicants receive a low-interest loan that consists of a combination of AERLP and lender-provided funds. The AERLP provides 50% of the total loan at 0% interest rate up to a maximum of $1,000,000. Rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities are limited to one loan every 2 years with a maximum loan of $500,000. The remainder of the loan is provided by a lender at market rate.


Eligible Technologies


Eligible renewable energy technologies include solar, biomass, wind and small hydro.


Process

Technical applications for projects with a total financed capital cost of $50,000 or less are reviewed on a continuous basis. Higher cost project are reviewed on a quarterly basis, with deadlines on October 31, January 31, April 30, and July 31.


Submissions received during a given application cycle are reviewed and ranked. Those applications receiving the highest ranking are selected to receive loans, subject to the sufficient available program funds. After the Energy Center technically qualifies a project, the lending institution chosen by the applicant financially qualifies the applicant. The lender manages the entire loan and arranges repayment of the AERLP share of the loan to the Iowa Energy Center.


The maximum loan term allowed for the AERLP funds is 20 years. As the loans are paid back to the Iowa Energy Center, those funds are cycled back into the program and made available to new applicants.


Through the end of June 2012, the AERLP provided loans of more than $28.4 million in support of 195 renewable energy projects since its inception.
Alternative Energy Engineering Activity (Minnesota) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province This statute establishes an alternative energy engineering activity to provide on-site technical assistance for alternative energy and conservation projects; develop information materials and educational programs to meet the needs of engineers, technicians, developers, and others in the alternative energy field; conduct feasibility studies when the results of the studies would be of benefit to others working in the same area; facilitate development of energy projects through assistance in finding financing, meeting regulatory requirements, gaining public and private support, limited technical consultation, and similar forms of assistance; and work with and use the services of Minnesota design professionals.
Alternative Energy Investment Tax Credit (Montana) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory Commercial and net metering alternative energy investments of $5,000 or more are eligible for a tax credit of up to 35% against individual or corporate tax on income generated by the investment. The investment must be depreciable. The credit is applied only against taxes due as a consequence of taxable or net income produced by:


  • A manufacturing plant that is located in Montana and that produces alternative energy generating equipment;
  • A new business facility or the expanded portion of an existing business facility that supplies basic energy needed from the alternative energy generating equipment, on a direct contract sales basis; or
  • The alternative energy generating equipment itself.

This credit is available to taxpayers purchasing an existing facility as well as to those building a new facility. While net metered systems are eligible, the tax credit is only for any income generated by the system.

The tax credit must be taken the year the equipment is placed in service; however, any portion of the tax credit that exceeds the amount of tax to be paid may be carried over and applied against state tax liability for the following 7 years. If a project sized 5 megawatts (MW) or larger is installed on an Indian reservation in Montana, a credit may be extended through the 15th tax year succeeding the tax year of installation, provided that the installation meets other specified criteria.

Taxpayers may not take this credit in conjunction with any other state energy or state investment tax benefits, or with the property tax exemption for non-fossil energy property.
Alternative Energy Investment Tax Credit (Corporate) (Montana) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory Commercial and net metering alternative energy investments of $5,000 or more are eligible for a tax credit of up to 35% against individual or corporate tax on income generated by the investment. The investment must be depreciable. The credit is applied only against taxes due as a consequence of taxable or net income produced by:


  • A manufacturing plant that is located in Montana and that produces alternative energy generating equipment;
  • A new business facility or the expanded portion of an existing business facility that supplies basic energy needed from the alternative energy generating equipment, on a direct contract sales basis; or
  • The alternative energy generating equipment itself.

This credit is available to taxpayers purchasing an existing facility as well as to those building a new facility. While net metered systems are eligible, the tax credit is only for any income generated by the system.

A "net metering system" means a facility for the production of electrical energy that:
(a) uses solar, wind, or hydropower for fuel;
(b) has a generating capacity of 50 kilowatts or less;
(c) is located on the customer-generator's premises;
(d) operates in parallel with the utility's distribution facilities; and
(e) is intended primarily to offset part or all of the customer-generator's requirements for electricity.

The tax credit must be taken the year the equipment is placed in service; however, any portion of the tax credit that exceeds the amount of tax to be paid may be carried over and applied against state tax liability for the following 7 years. If a project sized 5 megawatts (MW) or larger is installed on an Indian reservation in Montana, a credit may be extended through the 15th tax year succeeding the tax year of installation, provided that the installation meets other specified criteria.

Taxpayers may not take this credit in conjunction with any other state energy or state investment tax benefits, or with the property tax exemption for non-fossil energy property.
Alternative Energy Investment Tax Credit (Personal) (Montana) Personal Tax Credit State/Territory Commercial and net metering alternative energy investments of $5,000 or more are eligible for a tax credit of up to 35% against individual or corporate tax on income generated by the investment. The investment must be depreciable. The credit is applied only against taxes due as a consequence of taxable or net income produced by:


  • A manufacturing plant that is located in Montana and that produces alternative energy generating equipment;
  • A new business facility or the expanded portion of an existing business facility that supplies basic energy needed from the alternative energy generating equipment, on a direct contract sales basis; or
  • The alternative energy generating equipment itself.

This credit is available to taxpayers purchasing an existing facility as well as to those building a new facility. While net metered systems are eligible, the tax credit is only for any income generated by the system.

A "net metering system" means a facility for the production of electrical energy that:
(a) uses solar, wind, or hydropower for fuel;
(b) has a generating capacity of 50 kilowatts or less;
(c) is located on the customer-generator's premises;
(d) operates in parallel with the utility's distribution facilities; and
(e) is intended primarily to offset part or all of the customer-generator's requirements for electricity.

The tax credit must be taken the year the equipment is placed in service; however, any portion of the tax credit that exceeds the amount of tax to be paid may be carried over and applied against state tax liability for the following 7 years. If a project sized 5 megawatts (MW) or larger is installed on an Indian reservation in Montana, a credit may be extended through the 15th tax year succeeding the tax year of installation, provided that the installation meets other specified criteria.

Taxpayers may not take this credit in conjunction with any other state energy or state investment tax benefits, or with the property tax exemption for non-fossil energy property.
Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard State/Territory Iowa requires its two investor-owned utilities (MidAmerican Energy and Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light) to own or to contract for a combined total of 105 megawatts (MW) of renewable generating capacity and associated energy production. Eligible resources include solar, wind, waste management, resource recovery, refuse-derived fuel, agricultural crops or residues, woodburning facilities, or small hydropower facilities.

The Iowa Utilities Board has allocated the 105 MW between the two utilities based on each utility's percentage of their combined estimated Iowa retail peak demand in 1990. This breaks down to:

  • MidAmerican Energy: 55.2 MW (52.57% of demand)
  • Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (IPL): 49.8 MW (47.43% of demand)

Compliance and Renewable Energy Credits
The IUB issued an order in November 2007 (in Docket No. AEP-07-1) approving specific generating facilities designated by MidAmerican and IPL for satisfying the utilities’ 105-MW requirement. This order cleared the way for the utilities to participate in renewable energy credit (REC) trading programs by differentiating between renewable electricity production capacity used to comply with Iowa law and that which remains uncommitted. For the present, IPL is fulfilling its entire obligation with wind while MidAmerican is fulfilling its obligation with wind and a small amount of biogas capacity.

In 2001, Iowa's governor established a secondary, voluntary goal of 1,000 MW of wind generating capacity by 2010.

History

Originally, for incentive ratemaking purposes, the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) interpreted the 105 MW specified in the statute as "average capacity" based on kilowatt-hour output. As a result, the IUB's interpretation of the statute mandated the payment of incentive rates for 260 MW of renewable energy -- the nameplate capacity of 105 "average" MW. After the FERC overturned Iowa’s renewable incentive rate program in 1997, the IUB rescinded the "average capacity" rate making concept, which is no longer part of the IUB rules.
Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive State/Territory Note: The exemption may only be taken on taxes levied between December 31, 2002 and January 1, 2013.


In July 2002, the Michigan legislature created a statewide personal property tax exemption designed to promote the development, commercialization, and manufacturing of a broad range of alternative energy technologies. The Michigan Next Energy Authority Act of 2002 subsequently created the Michigan Next Energy Authority which among other things is tasked with certifying alternative energy property tax exemptions within the state on a yearly basis.

Property exempt from personal property tax includes:


  • alternative energy systems less than two megawatts (MW), or an integrated combination of alternative energy systems of no more than 10 MW (except for wind, photovoltaics and fuel cells, which have no capacity limit)
  • alternative energy vehicles
  • the personal property of an alternative energy technology business
  • the personal property of a business not engaged in alternative-energy technology that is used solely for the purpose of researching, developing or manufacturing alternative energy technologies

Alternative energy systems include: fuel cells, PV, solar thermal heating and cooling, wind energy, CHP, microturbines, miniturbines, Stirling engines, electricity storage systems, and clean fuel energy systems powered by methane, natural gas, methanol, ethanol or hydrogen. See MCL § 207.822 for a complete listing of eligible technologies. The exemption may be taken on taxes levied between December 31, 2002 and January 1, 2013.

The exemption applies to companies engaged in the manufacturing or research and development of alternative energy technologies and non-residential alternative technology owners. Property must be new to Michigan; must not have previously been subject to or exempted from Michigan taxation; and be certified by the Michigan Next Energy Authority in order to qualify for the exemption. The exemption does not include real property, such as land and buildings. Local school districts or local tax collecting units may adopt a resolution disallowing exemption of the property from certain taxes.

The NextEnergy Authority legislation was amended in 2006 (SB 583), making additional alternative energy technologies and systems eligible for tax benefits. The amendment expands tax exemption eligibility to include biomass energy systems and thermoelectric energy systems, broadens the scope of companies that can be certified as alternative energy technology companies, expands the definition of alternative energy vehicles to include hydraulic hybrid vehicles, broadens the definition of clean fuels to include renewable fuels such as biodiesel and fuels from biomass, and removes the capacity caps for fuel cell, photovoltaic, and wind energy systems.

Separately, the Michigan Strategic Fund designated a Michigan NextEnergy Zone as a Renaissance Zone in 2002. The Renaissance Zone designation means that businesses within the NextEnergy Zone may be eligible for other tax benefits*. The NextEnergy Zone is located in Detroit at Wayne State University Research and Technology Park. It is home to the NextEnergy Center, which includes laboratory facilities, business incubator space, and other facilities to support Michigan’s alternative energy industry. Contact the NextEnergy Center for more information.


*Public Act 38 of 2011 repealed the Michigan Business Tax (MBT) and implemented the Corporate Income Tax (CIT). Public Act 39 was passed in conjunction with the CIT and allows for credits awarded under the MBT to be retained for the duration of the agreements. Businesses receiving certain credits, including Renaissance Zone credits, may choose to either continue to file under the MBT to continue claiming their credits, or file under the CIT. No additional Renaissance Zone business tax credits will be awarded after 2011.
Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard State/Territory Note: Legislation passed in 2012 (S.B. 289 and S.B. 315) added certain new technologies to the list of eligible Renewable Energy Resources and Advanced Energy Resources. In July 2012, The PUCO opened Docket 12-2156-EL-ORD in order to implement the changes. PUCO is accepting comments on the proposed rules, and comments reviewing OAC 4901:1-10, until January 7, 2013.

In May 2008, Ohio enacted broad electric industry restructuring legislation (S.B. 221) containing advanced energy and renewable energy generation and procurement requirements for the state's electric distribution utilities and electric service companies (hereafter referred to as utilities). This definition encompasses all retail electricity providers except municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. Under the standard, utilities must provide 25% of their retail electricity supply from alternative energy resources by 2025, with specific annual benchmarks for renewable and solar energy resources (see details below). Half of the standard can be met with “any new, retrofitted, refueled, or repowered generating facility located in Ohio,” including fossil fuels, making the renewables portion of the standard 12.5% renewables by 2025.

Eligible Alternative Energy Technologies
In order to qualify under the standard, all advanced energy and renewable energy facilities must have a placed-in-service date of January 1, 1998, or later. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) is authorized to classify any new technology as an advanced energy or renewable energy resource.

Renewable Energy Resources
Eligible renewable resources are defined to include the following technologies: solar photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal technologies used to produce electricity, wind, geothermal, biomass, biologically derived methane gas, landfill gas, certain non-treated waste biomass products, solid waste (as long as the process to convert it to electricity does not include combustion), fuel cells that generate electricity, certain storage facilities, and qualified hydroelectric facilities.* In 2012, S.B. 315 and S.B. 289 added certain cogeneration and waste heat recovery system technologies that meet specific requirements. A waste heat recovery or cogeneration system may qualify for either the Renewable Energy Resource Standard or the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard. Distributed generation systems used by customers to generate electricity using the aforementioned eligible renewable resources are also included.

Advanced Energy Resources
Generally, advanced energy resources are defined as any process or technology that increases the generation output of an electric generating facility without additional carbon dioxide emissions. The definition of advanced energy resources explicitly includes clean coal; generation III advanced nuclear power; distributed combined heat and power (CHP); fuel cells that generate electricity; certain solid waste conversion technologies; and demand side management or energy efficiency improvements. Additionally, new or existing mercantile customer-sited advanced energy resources and renewable energy resources that the customer commits into a utility's demand-response, energy efficiency or peak demand programs are also eligible “advanced energy” resources. This designation generally includes any advanced or renewable technology that would be eligible if it were owned by a utility, but is also specifically includes waste heat resources, energy storage technologies, and resources that improve the relationship between real and reactive power. In 2012, S.B. 315 added a provision that allows any new, retrofitted, refueled, or repowered generating facility in Ohio to qualify as an advanced energy resource.

AEPS Compliance
Annual Obligation
A utility's obligation under the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS) is calculated using the average of a utility's total retail sales (sold under standard service offer) during the preceding three calendar years as a baseline. At least 50% of the renewable energy requirement must be met by in-state facilities, and the remaining 50% with resources that can be shown to be deliverable into the state. The renewable benchmarks begin in 2009 and increase annually towards an eventual target of 12.5% of retail electricity sales (kWh) by 2024 and thereafter. Utilities are required to file a compliance report by April 15 of each year. These reports must allow and consider public comments. PUCO in turn must review reports and report back to the General Assembly on a yearly basis. The 2012 PUCO report is available here and covers compliance years 2009 and 2010.

Solar Carve Out
The requirement also contains a carve-out for solar-energy resources with an ultimate solar target of 0.5% of the total electricity supply in 2024 and thereafter. The total renewable percentage requirement includes the solar specific portion (i.e., the solar requirement is not added on top of the specified renewables requirement). The detailed schedule of annual compliance benchmarks appears below. The law does not identify annual benchmarks for the overall alternative energy standard.


Year Renewable (%) Benchmark Solar (%) Benchmark
2009 0.25 0.004
2010 0.5 0.010
2011 1.0 0.030
2012 1.5 0.060
2013 2.0 0.090
2014 2.5 0.12
2015 3.5 0.15
2016 4.5 0.18
2017 5.5 0.22
2018 6.5 0.26
2019 7.5 0.30
2020 8.5 0.34
2021 9.5 0.38
2022 10.5 0.42
2023 11.5 0.46
2024+ 12.5 0.50
Renewable Energy Credits (RECs)

The annual benchmark obligations may be met through the purchase of qualified renewable energy credits (RECs), which are defined as the environmental attributes associated with one megawatt hour of electricity generated by a renewable energy resource. Under the standard, RECs have a lifetime of five years following their acquisition. The utility utilizing RECs for compliance must be a registered member with PJM’s generation attribute tracking system (GATS) and/or Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) generation attribute tracking system, and/or other credible tracking system PUCO subsequently approves. Only RECs generated after the effective date of S.B. 221 (July 31, 2008) may be used for compliance.

Annual Review and Alternative Compliance Payments (ACP)
PUCO is also tasked with annually reviewing compliance with the renewable and solar energy benchmarks and imposing penalties if the benchmarks are not met. The alternative compliance payment (ACP) for the renewable portion is initially set at $45/megawatt-hour (MWh) but will be adjusted annually by PUCO according to the federal Consumer Price Index, although it will never be less than $45/MWh. The Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) is set at $450/MWh in 2009, reduced to $400/MWh in 2010 and 2011, and will be reduced by $50 every two years thereafter to a minimum of $50/MWh in 2024. Compliance payments will be deposited into the Ohio Advanced Energy Fund, which provides financial support to renewable energy and energy efficiency projects within the state. Utilities may not pass along the cost of compliance payments to their customers.

The law contains clauses for cost limitations and allowances for non-compliance for reasons beyond a utility's control (i.e., force majeure). Utilities are not required to comply with the annual benchmarks if it is "reasonably expected" to raise their costs by 3% or more above what they would have otherwise been.** The PUCO may require the utility to make solicitations for renewable energy resource credits before the utility may request a force majeure determination. PUCO is authorized to reduce a utility's obligation under the standard if it receives a petition for such treatment from the utility and determines that resources sufficient to meet the obligation are not reasonably available. Under these circumstances a utility may be required to make up the shortfall with additional purchases in subsequent years.

Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard
S.B. 221 also requires utilities to implement energy efficiency and peak demand reduction programs that achieve a cumulative energy savings of 22% by the end of 2025, and reduce peak demand by 1.0% in 2009 and 0.75% annually thereafter through 2018. These requirements are separate and distinct from the Alternative Energy Resource Standard.


*In order to be considered a renewable resource for the purposes of the renewable resource standard, a hydroelectric facility must meet a series of requirements regarding its environmental impact. However, these requirements do not include a size limitation (e.g., 30 MW) of the type frequently found in state RPS laws.

**S.B. 232 made a slight amendment to this cost limitation provision.
Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (Pennsylvania) Renewables Portfolio Standard State/Territory Pennsylvania's Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), created by S.B. 1030 on November 30, 2004, requires each electric distribution company (EDC) and electric generation supplier (EGS) to retail electric customers in Pennsylvania to supply 18% of its electricity using alternative-energy resources by 2020.* The law initially exempted EDCs (and EGSs operating within an EDC's service territory) from having to comply with the standard during rate freeze and restructuring cost recovery periods. The exemption periods began expiring in 2007, and as of January 1, 2011 none remain in force. Pennsylvania's standard provides for a solar set-aside, mandating a certain percentage of electricity generated by photovoltaics (PV). Pennsylvania's AEPS also includes demand-side management, waste coal, coal-mine methane and coal gasification as eligible technologies.

In 2007 H.B. 1203 provided a more detailed solar schedule, clarified the force majeure clause, confirmed REC property rights for generators, added solar thermal to Tier I, clarified that AEPS credits (Alternative Energy Credits or AECs) cannot have been retired for other purposes, and expanded the definition of customer-generator. Revised rules addressing these changes and other necessary clarifications became effective in November 2008.

Separate from the PUC rule making that took place during 2008, the Pennsylvania legislature enacted H.B. 2200 in October 2008 further amending the RPS. The amendments added specific low-impact hydropower projects as Tier I resources, and also classified pulping and wood manufacturing by-products as either Tier I (in-state facilities) or Tier II (out-of-state facilities) resources. Prior to this, all facilities of this type were defined as Tier II resources. The Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is required to increase the Tier I percentage (%) requirements on a quarterly basis to reflect these additions to the Tier I resource classification. The PUC subsequently issued an order describing how this will take place, beginning June 1, 2009 (the beginning of the 2009-2010 compliance year). This magnitude of this adjustment has been tiny, amounting to an average increase of 0.004% to the Tier I compliance requirement during CY 2012.

There are two categories of energy sources under the law, termed "Tiers". The standard calls for utilities to generate 8% of their electricity by using "Tier I" energy sources and 10% using "Tier II" sources by May 31, 2021. Generally, eligible resources must originate within Pennsylvania or within the PJM regional transmission organization (RTO) in order to be counted for compliance. However, out-of-state resources located in the MISO (which also serves a portion of Pennsylvania) may be used in areas served by the MISO. This effectively limits the use of out-of-state MISO based resources to the Pennsylvania Power Co. or EGSs operating within its service territory.

Tier I sources include new and existing facilities which produce electricity using the following sources/technologies: photovoltaic energy, solar-thermal energy, wind, low-impact hydro, geothermal, biomass, biologically-derived methane gas, coal-mine methane and fuel cells.

Tier II sources include (new and existing) waste coal, distributed generation (DG) systems, demand-side management, large-scale hydro, municipal solid waste, wood pulping and manufacturing byproducts, and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal technology. (See 73 P.S. § 1648.2 for detailed definitions of eligible alternative-energy sources.) The Technical Reference Manual, first adopted in May 2009 but revised annually, contains a detailed description of how demand-side management will be addressed under the standard. The eligible energy efficiency technologies listed at the top of this page are a selection of specific measured identified in the Technical Reference Manual. Solar thermal technologies that do not produce electricity (e.g., domestic solar water heaters) are considered Tier II demand-side management resources.

The PUC has adopted the following 15-year compliance schedule to implement Pennsylvania's AEPS. The compliance year (CY) for the standard runs from June 1 to May 31 and is followed by a 3-month true-up period. The table below refers to each compliance year according to the year in which it ends (e.g., CY 2008 ran from June 1, 2007 to May 31, 2008). Due to supplier exemptions, CY 2007 did not begin until February 28, 2007. All other compliance years include a full year of time.

Compliance Year (CY) Tier I (including Solar PV)** Tier II Solar PV
CY 2007 1.5% 4.2% 0.0013%
CY 2008 1.5% 4.2% 0.0030%
CY 2009 2.0% 4.2% 0.0063%
CY 2010 2.5% 4.2% 0.0120%
CY 2011 3.0% 6.2% 0.0203%
CY 2012 3.5% 6.2% 0.0325%
CY 2013 4.0% 6.2% 0.0510%
CY 2014 4.5% 6.2% 0.0840%
CY 2015 5.0% 6.2% 0.1440%
CY 2016 5.5% 8.2% 0.2500%
CY 2017 6.0% 8.2% 0.2933%
CY 2018 6.5% 8.2% 0.3400%
CY 2019 7.0% 8.2% 0.3900%
CY 2020 7.5% 8.2% 0.4433%
CY 2021 8.0% 10.0% 0.5000%


Compliance is based on alternative energy credits (AECs). An AEC is equal to a megawatt-hour of qualified generation, and credits are the property of the generator unless expressly transferred. Banking of excess credits is allowed for up to two years, thus an AEC's useful life is three years, the year it was produced and the two subsequent years for which it can be banked. AECs are tracked by the PJM GATS system. Notably, the 2008 rule amendments exempt PV systems of 15 kW or less from a requirement that AEC production be verified by metered data, instead allowing the AEC program administrator to verify system output through alternate means (i.e., an engineering estimate of annual production). All other systems must have AEC production verified by metered data, and the rule has been implemented to only allow such "alternate means" to be used in cases where the system is not equipped with a revenue-grade system production meter.

The law establishes an alternative compliance payment (ACP) of $45 per megawatt-hour for shortfalls in Tier I and Tier II resources. A separate ACP for solar PV is calculated as 200% times the sum of (1) the market value of solar AECs for the reporting period and (2) the levelized value of up-front rebates received by sellers of solar AECs. Monies received through the ACP will be transferred into Pennsylvania's Sustainable Energy Funds and used solely to support alternative-energy projects.

The PUC has determined that electric distribution companies may fully recover "the reasonable and prudently incurred costs of complying" with the AEPS. These include the costs for purchases of alternative energy or alternative energy credits, payments to credit program administrators, and costs levied by RTOs to ensure that alternative resources are reliable. Recoverable costs generally do not include ACPs. The costs will be recovered through an automatic adjustment and are considered to be a cost of generation supply.

The AEPS contains a force majeure clause under which the PUC can make a determination as to whether there are sufficient alternative energy resources in the market for utilities to meet their targets. If the PUC determines that utilities are unable to comply with the standard despite good faith efforts, it may alter the obligation for a given year. The Commission may then require higher obligations in subsequent years to compensate for shortfalls.

Reports summarizing progress and compliance with the standard for 2007 - 2010 are available on the program website.


*Pennsylvania's rural electric cooperatives must offer retail customers a voluntary program of energy efficiency and demand-side management programs to satisfy compliance with the AEPS.

**With the 2008 legislation designating additional Tier I resources and providing for equivalent increases to the Tier I compliance %, the values listed here no longer precisely reflect actual Tier I obligations. As the increases associated with this change will be based on actual generation from the newly designated Tier I resources, it cannot be known precisely in advance how much the values will change for future years. As noted above, the quarterly adjustments averaged 0.004% during CY 2012.
Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers Tax Credit (New Mexico) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory The Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers tax credit may be claimed for manufacturing alternative energy products and components, including renewable energy systems, fuel cell systems, and electric and hybrid-electric vehicles. Alternative energy components include parts, assembly of parts, materials, ingredients, or supplies that are incorporated directly into end-use products. In 2011 S.B. 233 added "products extracted from or secreted by a single cell photosynthetic organism" to the list of eligible alternative energy products.

The total amount of the credit is approved by the Taxation and Revenue Department and is not to exceed 5% of the taxpayer’s qualified expenditures. A qualified expenditure is the purchase of manufacturing equipment made after July 1, 2006.


To be eligible to claim a credit, the taxpayer must employ at least one new full-time employee for every $500,000 of expenditures up to $30,000,000, and at least one new full-time employee for every $1,000,000 of expenditures over $30,000,000.

The alternative energy product manufacturers tax credit may only be deducted from the taxpayer's modified combined tax liability, which is the total liability for the reporting period for the gross receipts, compensating tax, and withholding tax. Any portion of the alternative energy product manufacturers tax credit that remains unused at the end of the taxpayer's reporting period may be carried forward for 5 years.
Alternative Energy Projects by Rural Electric Membership Corporations (Indiana) Industry Recruitment/Support
Performance-Based Incentive
Property Tax Incentive
Corporate Tax Incentive
Grant Program
Personal Tax Incentives
Rebate Program
State/Province This legislation encourages the development of alternative energy projects using clean or renewable resources by rural electric membership corporations. The section establishes the Office of Alternative Energy Incentives within the Office of Energy Development, as well as an alternative energy incentive fund to aid corporations in project implementation. The chapter describes application procedures to this fund and procedures for joint development of projects.
Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program (Montana) State Loan Program State/Territory The Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program (AERLP) provides loans to individuals, small businesses, local government agencies, units of the university system, and nonprofit organizations to install alternative energy systems that generate energy for their own use. The program is funded by air quality penalties collected by the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), and also used funding from The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The program is administered by DEQ, which is responsible for developing the rules.

Alternative energy systems are defined by the Montana Code as "the generation system or equipment used to convert energy sources into usable sources." Technologies included in this definition are fuel cells using non-fossil fuels, geothermal, low emissions wood or biomass, wind, photovoltaics, solar water heating, small hydropower (under 1 megawatt), and other recognized non-fossil forms of generation. DEQ provides a technical review and approval of systems proposed for the loan program.

In 2005, SB 50 added local government agencies, units of the university system, and nonprofit organizations to the list of eligible sectors, and allowed energy conservation measures to be financed when installed with an eligible renewable energy project. Energy conservation measures financed by the loan are limited to 20% of the total loan amount. Interest rates are set annually and are fixed for the term of the loan - the rate for 2014 is 3.25%. Some funding from ARRA temporarily boosted the loan amount in April 2010, but loan amounts have returned to previous levels; the maximum loan amount is $40,000, with a maximum loan term of 10 years. Approximately $1 million in funding is available for the period starting July 2013.

DEQ will accept and process loan applications throughout the year. Approved projects will be ranked according to criteria published in the Administrative Rules of Montana (ARM) Title 17, Chapter 85. This criteria includes items such as system reliability, return on investment and avoided fossil fuel consumption. Once a loan is approved, the applicant will be informed as to whether funds are currently available and when new funds are anticipated if funds are not currently available.
Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) Green Power Purchasing
Siting and Permitting
State/Province Ohio's Alternative Energy Zones are made possible through Ohio's Senate Bill 232, which reduced taxes on alternative energy projects. The Alternative Energy Zones are designated on a county-by-county basis, and provide developers with incentive for projects located in these counties. Incentives include a quicker approval process and set rates for revenue.
Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Corporate) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory

Massachusetts offers a corporate excise tax deduction for (1) any income -- including royalty income -- received from the sale or lease of a U.S. patent deemed beneficial for energy conservation or alternative energy development by the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, and (2) any income received from the sale or lease of personal or real property or materials manufactured in Massachusetts and subject to the approved patent. The deduction is effective for up to five years from the date of issuance of the U.S. patent or the date of approval by the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, whichever expires first.

Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory

Massachusetts offers a personal income tax deduction for any income received from the sale of a patent or royalty income from a patent deemed beneficial for energy conservation or alternative energy development. The Massachusetts commissioner of energy resources determines if a patent is eligible. This deduction is unique among incentives in that it targets patents and not simply real property.

Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Kentucky Economic Development and Finance Authority (KEDFA) provides tax incentives to construct, retrofit, or upgrade an alternative fuel production or gasification facility that uses coal or biomass as a feedstock. Beginning Aug. 1, 2010, tax incentives are also available for energy-efficient alternative fuel production facilities and up to five alternative fuel production facilities that use natural gas or natural gas liquids as a feedstock. Energy-efficient alternative fuels are defined as homogeneous fuels that are produced from processes designed to densify feedstocks such as coal, waste coal, or biomass resources, and have an energy content that is greater than the feedstock. The incentives may consist of: 1) a refund of up to 100 percent of the state sales tax paid on the purchase of personal property used to construct the facility; 2) a credit of up to 100 percent of an approved company's state income tax and limited liability entity tax that is generated by the project; 3) up to 4 percent of the wage assessment of employees whose jobs were created as a result of the construction, retrofit, upgrade or operation of a qualified facility; and 4) a credit for up to 80 percent of the severance tax paid for coal, natural gas, or natural gas liquids used as a feedstock. The incentives expire at the time of receipt of the authorized incentives or 25 years from activation of the project, whichever occurs first. Approved companies may recover up to 50 percent of their capital investment through the authorized tax incentives. The minimum capital investment for incentive eligibility is $25 million for an alternative fuel or gasification facility that uses biomass as the primary feedstock; $100 million for an alternative fuel or gasification facility that uses coal, natural gas, or natural gas liquids as the primary feedstock; and $25 million for an energy-efficient alternative fuel facility.
Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) Loan Program State/Province The Missouri Department of Agriculture offers direct loans through the Agriculture Development Fund to finance the production, processing and marketing needs of an alternative agricultural enterprise. An agricultural alternative project is doing something different from what traditional rural operations are currently doing.

Criteria: - Applicant must be a legal Missouri resident and the project must be located in Missouri - Applicant must be a minimum of 14 years of age - Maximum loan - $20,000 - Interest Rate - 5.9%

- Maximum term of loan - 5 years with semi-annual payments
Alternative Regulation (Vermont) Generating Facility Rate-Making State/Province Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type of regulation, but the common foundation is that rates are set differently from the traditional cost-of-service approach. Sometimes there is a performance-based aspect to rate-setting so that a utility is allowed to earn a larger profit if it meets certain performance goals or increases its efficiency. Other times a utility is allowed to automatically change certain aspects of its rates, without a full-scale review of all its costs (as would occur under a typical cost-of-service review). Sometimes this type of regulation "guarantees" a utility a certain amount of revenue or profit, or it provides a utility with greater flexibility to offer new services. Alternative regulation is generally approved for a specified number of years, after which time it is revisited by the utility and the regulators.
Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Grant Program State/Province In 2008, with the advent of OMAF and MRA's Bioeconomy-Industrial Uses research theme, the Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Development Fund (ARF) was consolidated with the New Directions Research Program. Therefore, Calls for Letters of Intent issued during the fiscal years of 2008-09 and 2009-10 through New Directions included ARF priorities.

Exploration of new markets and new uses for bioproducts, alternative renewable fuels and their co-products will contribute to the long term sustainability of Ontario's agri-food, energy and rural sectors. Investment in research will help position Ontario to take advantage of new technologies in these areas.

The Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund is a discretionary, competitive research fund open to universities, research institutions, industry, governments, organizations or partnership networks. Applicants outside Ontario may also apply if they can demonstrate how the proposed research will provide significant benefits or a unique competitive advantage for Ontario's agri-food industry, energy sector and/or rural communities.

The objectives of the Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund are to fund research that will:

Enable continuous improvement in the alternative renewable fuels industry products and processes; Promote agricultural value-added opportunities in the bioproducts and alternative renewable fuels industries in Ontario; and Assist alternative renewable fuels and biobased production facilities in Ontario to be major participants in these new worldwide markets. The application procedure involves a two stage process: Stage One involves the submission of a letter of intent; Stage Two involves the submission of a full proposal by invitation only to successful Stage One applicants.

The Call for Letters of Intent documents and submission information can be found on the Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund website.

Funding for this program is provided by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and GreenField Ethanol (formerly Commercial Alcohols Inc.).

  • 'Plus' in the fund name indicates the broadening of focus beyond alternative renewable fuels to include agricultural based bioproducts.
Alternative and Clean Energy State Loan Program (Pennsylvania) State Loan Program State/Territory It is important to note that some applicants are only eligible to apply under some aspects of the program. Political subdivisions are only permitted to apply for loans or grants for Clean Energy Projects. Businesses and non-profits may apply for loans for Alternative Energy Production Projects and Clean Energy Projects, but may only apply for grants for Alternative Energy Production Projects and for site preparation for an alternative energy system as a Clean Energy Project.
In July 2008, Pennsylvania enacted a broad $650 million alternative energy bill designed to provide support for a variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Included in this legislation was a provision authorizing the creation of a grant and loan program for alternative energy and clean energy production projects. The program is jointly administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), under the direction of Commonwealth Finance Authority (CFA). The most recent Program Guidelines were issued in January 2013. Incentives are available to businesses (including non-profits), economic development organizations, and political subdivisions (e.g., local governments, schools, etc.). 

The program will offer support for alternative energy and clean energy projects in the form of loans, grants and loan guarantees (i.e., grants to be used in the event of a financing default). Under this program, alternative energy production projects and clean energy production projects are governed by distinct sets of definitions and rules. Eligible activities for each type of project are described briefly below (see program rules for more detailed descriptions).

Clean Energy Projects

  • Construction or renovation of a High Performance Building.
  • Site preparation of a business park consisting exclusively of certified High Performance Buildings.
  • Installation of equipment to facilitate or improve energy conservation or energy efficiency (including but not limited to heating, lighting, and cooling equipment). Equipment must be Energy Star rated if applicable.
  • Installation of an alternative energy system which produces energy from sources defined under the state Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but not including solar energy.*
  • Replacement or enhancement of an existing energy system that utilizes nonrenewable energy with an energy system that utilizes alternative energy (as described above).
  • Modification of the contract terms of an energy service project by a political subdivision pursuant to a new energy savings contract (ESCO) with a qualified provider under the Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) of 1996.

Alternative Energy Production Projects (construction or development of):

  • An alternative energy project which produces energy from sources defined under the state Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but not including solar energy.*
  • A facility that manufactures or produces alternative fuels
  • A facility that manufactures or produces products, including component parts that provide alternative energy (as defined above), improve energy efficiency, or conserve energy
  • An alternative energy or alternative fuel R&D facility
  • A project for the development or enhancement of rail transportation systems that deliver alternative fuels or high efficiency locomotives.

Both types of project allow eligible costs associated with the preparation of plans, specifications, studies, and surveys, necessary or incidental to facilitating or developing an eligible project, and costs (up to 3%) associated with administering a grant. The individual support mechanisms are described in more detail below. For all types of support, there is a general requirement that applicants provide matching funds equivalent to the funding offered under the program (i.e., incentives generally limited to 50% of costs).

Loans Loans are available at a fixed interest rate which varies based on project type. Loans may generally be amortized over a period corresponding to the life of the equipment, not to exceed 25 years, and must be repaid within 10 years. Loans for energy efficiency and energy conservation projects (including geothermal systems) have a 10-year amortization. Loans for manufacturing facilities are limited to $40,000 per job created within three years of loan approval. Failure to create the requisite number of jobs within three years may cause the interest rate to be raised by 3% over the remaining portion of the loan. Loans are also generally limited to $5 million, although higher amounts may be authorized on a case-by-case basis as determined by the DCED.

Grants Grants for manufacturing facilities are available for up to $10,000 per job created within three years of grant approval. Grants are limited to $2 million for other alternative energy, clean energy projects, and high performance building projects; $500,000 for energy savings contracts (ESCOs); and $175,000 for planning and feasibility studies. Grants for green building projects are also limited to 10% of costs (as opposed to the general limit of 50% of costs for other projects).

Loan Guarantees Loan guarantees will take the form of a grant that may be used in the event of financing default on the part of the applicant. Loan guarantees are limited to 75% of the deficiency up to $5 million. The term of the grant may not exceed five years.

Special Session H.B. 1 authorized a total of $165 million for this program. Visit the program web site and review the funding guidelines for additional program details and application procedures.


*While solar energy is in fact eligible under the state AEPS, a specific solar energy program was also authorized as part of the enabling legislation and as a result solar energy projects have been excluded from some other programs created by the same legislation. The program guidelines do not list solar energy as an eligible technology. However, it appears that some solar technologies could qualify if they are incorporated into the broader design of a High Performance Building.
Alternative and Clean Energy Program (Pennsylvania) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory NOTE: It is important to note that some applicants are only eligible to apply under some aspects of the program. Political subdivisions are only permitted to apply for loans or grants for Clean Energy Projects. Businesses and non-profits may apply for loans for Alternative Energy Production Projects and Clean Energy Projects, but may only apply for grants for Alternative Energy Production Projects and for site preparation for an alternative energy system as a Clean Energy Project.


In July 2008, Pennsylvania enacted a broad $650 million alternative energy bill designed to provide support for a variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Included in this legislation was a provision authorizing the creation of a grant and loan program for alternative energy and clean energy production projects. The program is jointly administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), under the direction of Commonwealth Finance Authority (CFA). The most recent Program Guidelines were issued in October 2013 available here. Incentives are available to businesses (including non-profits), economic development organizations, and political subdivisions (e.g., local governments, schools, etc.).


The program will offer support for alternative energy and clean energy projects in the form of loans, grants and loan guarantees (i.e., grants to be used in the event of a financing default). Under this program, alternative energy production projects and clean energy production projects are governed by distinct sets of definitions and rules. Eligible activities for each type of project are described briefly below (see program rules for more detailed descriptions).

Clean Energy Projects


  • Construction or renovation of a High Performance Building.
  • Site preparation of a business park consisting exclusively of certified High Performance Buildings.
  • Installation of equipment to facilitate or improve energy conservation or energy efficiency (including but not limited to heating, lighting, and cooling equipment). Equipment must be ENERGY STAR rated if applicable.
  • Installation of an alternative energy system which produces energy from sources defined under the stateAlternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but not including solar energy.*
  • Replacement or enhancement of an existing energy system that utilizes nonrenewable energy with an energy system that utilizes alternative energy (as described above).
  • Modification of the contract terms of an energy service project by a political subdivision pursuant to a new energy savings contract (ESCO) with a qualified provider under the Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) of 1996.

Alternative Energy Production Projects (construction or development of):


  • An alternative energy project which produces energy from sources defined under the state Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but not including solar energy.*
  • A facility that manufactures or produces alternative fuels
  • A facility that manufactures or produces products, including component parts that provide alternative energy (as defined above), improve energy efficiency, or conserve energy
  • An alternative energy or alternative fuel R&D facility
  • A project for the development or enhancement of rail transportation systems that deliver alternative fuels or high efficiency locomotives.
  • Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fueling stations.

Both types of project allow eligible costs associated with the preparation of plans, specifications, studies, and surveys, necessary or incidental to facilitating or developing an eligible project, and costs (up to 2%) associated with administering a grant. The individual support mechanisms are described in more detail below. For all types of support, there is a general requirement that applicants provide matching funds equivalent to the funding offered under the program (i.e., incentives generally limited to 50% of costs).

Loans

Loans are available at interest rate caculated 250 basis point higher than the 10 year treasury bond (set at 5% for 2014). Loans may generally be amortized over a period corresponding to the life of the equipment, not to exceed 25 years, and must be repaid within 10 years. Loans for energy efficiency and energy conservation projects (including geothermal systems) have a 10-year amortization. Loans for manufacturing facilities are limited to $40,000 per job created within three years of loan approval. Failure to create the requisite number of jobs within three years may cause the interest rate to be raised by 3% over the remaining portion of the loan. Loans are also generally limited to $5 million, although higher amounts may be authorized on a case-by-case basis as determined by the DCED.


Grants


Maximum amount of grant for any alternative energy project or clean energy project is capped at $2 million or 30% of the project cost. Public Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) can get a grant up to 40% of the project costs, while a private CNG or LNG facility can get a grant up to 25% of the cost. Grant for Home Performance Building is capped at 10% of the cost; $500,000 for energy saving contracts (ESCOs); and $175,000 for planning and feasibility studies. Grants for manufacturing facilities are available for up to $10,000 for every job created within three years of grant approval. Total maximum amount of financial incentive including combination of loans and grants for any project is limited to 50% of the total project cost.


Loan Guarantees


Loan guarantees will take the form of a grant that may be used in the event of financing default on the part of the applicant. Loan guarantees are limited to 75% of the deficiency up to $5 million. The term of the grant may not exceed five years.

Special Session H.B. 1 authorized a total of $165 million for this program. Visit the program web site and review the funding guidelines for additional program details and application procedures.


*While solar energy is in fact eligible under the state AEPS, a specific solar energy program was also authorized as part of the enabling legislation and as a result solar energy projects have been excluded from some other programs created by the same legislation. The program guidelines do not list solar energy as an eligible technology. However, it appears that some solar technologies could qualify if they are incorporated into the broader design of a High Performance Building.
Alternative and Clean Energy State Grant Program (Pennsylvania) State Grant Program State/Territory It is important to note that some applicants are only eligible to apply under some aspects of the program. Political subdivisions are only permitted to apply for loans or grants for Clean Energy Projects. Businesses and non-profits may apply for loans for Alternative Energy Production Projects and Clean Energy Projects, but may only apply for grants for Alternative Energy Production Projects and for site preparation for an alternative energy system as a Clean Energy Project.
In July 2008, Pennsylvania enacted a broad $650 million alternative energy bill designed to provide support for a variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Included in this legislation was a provision authorizing the creation of a grant and loan program for alternative energy and clean energy production projects. The program is jointly administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), under the direction of Commonwealth Finance Authority (CFA). The most recent Program Guidelines were issued in January 2013. Incentives are available to businesses (including non-profits), economic development organizations, and political subdivisions (e.g., local governments, schools, etc.).

The program will offer support for alternative energy and clean energy projects in the form of loans, grants and loan guarantees (i.e., grants to be used in the event of a financing default). Under this program, alternative energy production projects and clean energy production projects are governed by distinct sets of definitions and rules. Eligible activities for each type of project are described briefly below (see program rules for more detailed descriptions).

Clean Energy Projects

  • Construction or renovation of a High Performance Building.
  • Site preparation of a business park consisting exclusively of certified High Performance Buildings.
  • Installation of equipment to facilitate or improve energy conservation or energy efficiency (including but not limited to heating, lighting, and cooling equipment). Equipment must be Energy Star rated if applicable.
  • Installation of an alternative energy system which produces energy from sources defined under the state Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but not including solar energy.*
  • Replacement or enhancement of an existing energy system that utilizes nonrenewable energy with an energy system that utilizes alternative energy (as described above).
  • Modification of the contract terms of an energy service project by a political subdivision pursuant to a new energy savings contract (ESCO) with a qualified provider under the Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) of 1996.

Alternative Energy Production Projects (construction or development of):

  • An alternative energy project which produces energy from sources defined under the state Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but not including solar energy.*
  • A facility that manufactures or produces alternative fuels
  • A facility that manufactures or produces products, including component parts that provide alternative energy (as defined above), improve energy efficiency, or conserve energy
  • An alternative energy or alternative fuel R&D facility
  • A project for the development or enhancement of rail transportation systems that deliver alternative fuels or high efficiency locomotives.

Both types of project allow eligible costs associated with the preparation of plans, specifications, studies, and surveys, necessary or incidental to facilitating or developing an eligible project, and costs (up to 3%) associated with administering a grant. The individual support mechanisms are described in more detail below. For all types of support, there is a general requirement that applicants provide matching funds equivalent to the funding offered under the program (i.e., incentives generally limited to 50% of costs).

Loans Loans are available at a fixed interest rate which varies based on project type. Loans may generally be amortized over a period corresponding to the life of the equipment, not to exceed 25 years, and must be repaid within 10 years. Loans for energy efficiency and energy conservation projects (including geothermal systems) have a 10-year amortization. Loans for manufacturing facilities are limited to $40,000 per job created within three years of loan approval. Failure to create the requisite number of jobs within three years may cause the interest rate to be raised by 3% over the remaining portion of the loan. Loans are also generally limited to $5 million, although higher amounts may be authorized on a case-by-case basis as determined by the DCED.

Grants Grants for manufacturing facilities are available for up to $10,000 per job created within three years of grant approval. Grants are limited to $2 million for other alternative energy, clean energy projects, and high performance building projects; $500,000 for energy savings contracts (ESCOs); and $175,000 for planning and feasibility studies. Grants for green building projects are also limited to 10% of costs (as opposed to the general limit of 50% of costs for other projects).

Loan Guarantees Loan guarantees will take the form of a grant that may be used in the event of financing default on the part of the applicant. Loan guarantees are limited to 75% of the deficiency up to $5 million. The term of the grant may not exceed five years.

Special Session H.B. 1 authorized a total of $165 million for this program. Visit the program web site and review the funding guidelines for additional program details and application procedures.


*While solar energy is in fact eligible under the state AEPS, a specific solar energy program was also authorized as part of the enabling legislation and as a result solar energy projects have been excluded from some other programs created by the same legislation. The program guidelines do not list solar energy as an eligible technology. However, it appears that some solar technologies could qualify if they are incorporated into the broader design of a High Performance Building.
Alternative and Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (West Virginia) Renewables Portfolio Standard State/Territory In June 2009, West Virginia enacted an Alternative and Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard that requires investor-owned utilities (IOUs)* with more than 30,000 residential customers to supply 25% of retail electric sales from eligible alternative and renewable energy resources by 2025.

While this law contains some provisions similar to those found in renewables portfolio standards (RPSs) adopted by other states, West Virginia's standard does not require a minimum contribution from renewable energy resources. It is therefore feasible that the standard could be met using only alternative resources and avoid using any renewable resources (as defined in the law). As a result, the renewable energy portion of the standard functions more like a non-binding goal.

Compliance The standard sets the following minimum benchmarks for electric utilities based on their annual electricity sales:

  • 10% from 2015 to 2019
  • 15% from 2020 to 2024
  • 25% by January 1, 2025

Utilities must submit compliance plans to the PSC by January 1, 2011, for review and approval. Within a year of receiving approval from the PSC, utilities must submit annual reports outlining their progress towards compliance. The PSC will evaluate compliance after January 1, 2015 and impose non-compliance assessments if the utility fails to comply with the standard.

Qualifying Alternative and Renewable Energy Resources To qualify, electricity produced by alternative and renewable resources must be generated or purchased from a facility in West Virginia or in the PJM Service Territory (the regional transmission organization which serves the state). The West Virginia Public Service Commission (PSC) is authorized to certify additional resources as either alternative or renewable. Furthermore, projects that reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions and certain demand-side or efficiency projects may be certified and counted towards meeting the standard.

Alternative Energy Resources In West Virginia, "alternative energy resources" include coal technology, coal bed methane, natural gas, fuel produced by a coal gasification or liquification facility, synthetic gas, integrated gasification combined cycle technologies, waste coal, tire-derived fuel, pumped storage hydroelectric projects, and recycled energy (through June 2010).

Renewable Energy Resources The definition of "renewable energy resources" includes solar-electric, solar thermal energy, wind power, run-of-river hydropower, geothermal energy, fuel cells, and certain biomass energy and biologically-derived fuels. S.B. 350 enacted in April 2010 changed "recycled energy" from classification as an "alternative energy resource" to a renewable energy resource (effective in June 2010).

Energy Credits

Compliance is based on alternative energy credits (AECs), and banking of excess credits is allowed. A credit is equal to a megawatt-hour (MWh) of alternative or renewable electricity generation. The PSC will establish a credit-trading system and public registry to track transactions. Credits will be awarded in the following way:

  • One credit for each MWh of electricity generated or purchased from an alternative energy resource facility. It should be noted that utilities may meet no more than 10% of the standard with credits obtained from electricity generated from natural gas.
  • Two credits for each MWh of electricity generated or purchased from a renewable energy resource facility
  • Three credits for each MWh of electricity generated or purchased from a renewable energy resource facility located on a reclaimed surface mine in West Virginia
  • Customer-generators will be awarded one credit for each MWh of electricity generated from an alternative energy resource facility and two credits for each MWh of electricity generated from a renewable energy resource facility.
  • The PSC is authorized to award one credit to an electric utility for each ton of carbon dioxide-equivalent reduced or offset by approved projects.
  • The PSC is also authorized to award one credit to an electric utility for each MWh of electricity conserved by an approved energy efficiency or demand-side management project, provided that the project savings are verified and certified according to PSC rules (to be determined).

In November 2011, the PSC ruled (Case No. 11-0249-E-P) that for PURPA qualifying facility (QF) contracts where AEC ownership is not addressed, the AECs are conveyed to the purchaser of the power.

*Including electric distribution companies or electric generation suppliers selling to retail customers. Municipal utilities, rural electric cooperatives, and other utilities serving fewer than 30,000 residential customers are specifically excluded from the standard, although the Public Service Commission (PSC) will consider adopting, by administrative rule, alternative and renewable requirements that would apply to these utilities.
Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba. Each criterion is classified as an objective, a guideline, or a Canada-wide Standard depending upon several factors. The objective classification is for those air pollutants sufficiently widespread in presence and potential environmental effect that national limits have been developed. The guideline classification is used for those pollutants of a more localized presence for which provincial limits have been developed. A Canada-wide Standard (CWS) is a national standard developed under the Canada-wide Environmental Standards Sub-agreement by the federal, provincial and territorial governments for a contaminant of national priority. This schedule is intended to serve as a guide for the evaluation of air quality and for planning purposes. The selection of the appropriate concentration category will depend upon the degree of protection to be afforded to affected receptors. Maximum Tolerable Levels are only for evaluation purposes to identify the severity of an anthropogenic or natural phenomenon in order to protect human health and institute appropriate corrective action. In general, Maximum Acceptable Levels are not to be exceeded in any urban centre including areas that are in the vicinity of industries with atmospheric emissions. Within rural areas, it is in the goal to maintain pollutant concentrations at or below Maximum Desirable Levels.
Ambient Air Quality Standards (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations set statewide ambient air quality standards for various contaminants. The state code follows the regulations set forth in the National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards as published in 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 50, as amended, with the exception of the annual PM10 standard specified is under the Iowa code that applies it to new source permitting provisions.
Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Siting and Permitting State/Province This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.
Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Environmental Regulations State/Province This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average:  110 ug/m3; 30-day average:  90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean:  60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing air contaminants and for carbon monoxide are also listed.
Ameren Missouri - Photovoltaic Rebate Program (Missouri) Utility Rebate Program Utility Ameren Missouri offers rebates to its customers for the installation of net metered photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The rebate is set at $2.00 per DC watt with a maximum rebate of $50,000. Systems of 100 kW or less (the maximum size allowed under Missouri's net metering rules) qualify for rebates on the first 25 kW of installed capacity. Only systems that become operational after December 31, 2009 are eligible for the rebate. Beginning in July 2014, the incentive rates will decline until they are phased out in July 2020.

In order to qualify for incentives, a customer must have an electric account in good standing with the utility. Eligible systems must use new equipment; be permanently installed on the customer's property; and have module and inverter manufacturer's warranties of at least 10 years. Installations must comply with all applicable federal, state and local codes and standards, including the state of Missouri's Interconnection Standards. Rebate recipients must certify that the system will remain in operation on their property for its useful life (deemed to be a minimum of 10 years). Notably, the customer retains ownership of all solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) generated by the system.

This program arises from 2008 Proposition C, a ballot initiative that established a state renewable portfolio standard in Missouri and required the state's investor-owned utilities to offer solar rebates of at least $2.00 per watt beginning in 2010.
Ameren Missouri - Solar Renewable Energy Credits Performance-Based Incentive Utility Ameren Missouri offers a Standard Offer Contract to customers that generate solar power. The customer must meet Ameren's net metering requirements and submit an application for net metering. The 2013 SREC tariff is $5 per SREC, which is down significantly from the 2012 rate of $50 per SREC.

For systems of less than 10 kW, Ameren will pay an up-front, lump sum payment for the estimated number of Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs) that will be produced for 10 years. The estimated 10-year production will be calculated by Ameren using PVWatts software.

For systems of 10 kW to 100 kW, Ameren offers a 10-year contract for the SRECs, and will make annual payments to the customer based on the number of SRECs produced in the previous year.
An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the Redevelopment of Contaminated Property - The “Brownfields” Act (Massachusetts) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides liability relief and financial incentives aimed to encourage cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated sites. Financial incentives include encouraging private sector lending to developers, low-interest loans and grants for site assessment and cleanup, and tax credits.
An Act to Facilitate Testing and Demonstration of Renewable Ocean Energy Technology (Maine) Siting and Permitting State/Province This law streamlines and coordinates State permitting and submerged lands leasing requirements for renewable ocean energy demonstration projects, aiding Maine's goal to become an international proving ground for testing new technologies in specific locations along the coast in an environmentally responsible manner. This law amended the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act (MWDCA) to establish a new general permit process for tidal energy demonstration projects. To qualify for a general permit as a tidal energy demonstration project, a project must use tidal action as a source of electrical power; must have a total installed generating capacity of 5 megawatts or less; and must be proposed for the primary purpose of testing tidal energy generation technology, including mooring or anchoring systems and transmission lines, and collecting and assessing information on the environmental and other effects of the technology. This law also amended the Natural Resources Protection Act (NRPA) to establish a new general permit process for offshore wind energy demonstration projects, including wave energy test projects. To qualify for this general permit, a wave energy test project must use ocean wave energy to produce electricity; be proposed as part of an offshore wind energy demonstration project and be designed and sited to test production of electricity from wave energy in conjunction with and in a manner that complements electricity produced by an offshore wind energy turbine; employ up to 2 wave energy converters, each of which may use different technology, not already in use in the Gulf of Maine for commercial energy production, for the primary purpose of testing and validating the overall design of the converter and related systems; and may include a mooring or anchoring system and an ocean sensor package.
An Act to Implement the Recommendations of the Governor's Ocean Energy Task Force (Maine) Siting and Permitting State/Province This law was enacted to overcome economic, technical and regulatory obstacles and to provide economic incentives for vigorous and efficient development of promising indigenous, renewable ocean energy resources. The law amended the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act (MWDCA) to provide that it is the policy of the State to encourage the attraction of appropriately sited development related to tidal and wave energy, including any additional transmission and other energy infrastructure needed to transport such energy to market, consistent with all state environmental standards; the permitting and siting of tidal and wave energy projects; and the siting, permitting, financing and construction of tidal and wave energy research and manufacturing facilities. Thus, all applications for tidal and wave energy projects must be processed in keeping with this policy. The Act also made several procedural changes to existing law, including specifying that tidal and wave energy projects are not required to be consistent with Land Use Regulation Commission zoning, even if located in an unorganized territory.
An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) Siting and Permitting State/Province An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and changed the Commission’s name to the Land Use Planning Commission. Under the Act, permitting review for significant projects, such as grid-scale wind projects, in the "unorganized territories" is no longer the responsibility of the Commission, but falls under the jurisdiction of the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). This change enables wind project permitting to have a standard procedure and review process throughout the state.
Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive (New York) Performance-Based Incentive State/Territory NOTE: Previous Program Opportunity Notice (PON) 2276 has been replaced with PON 2828 with updated incentives. The program is now actively accepting applications until December 31, 2015 or until the funds are fully committed.


The Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity program is designed to support small-sized electricity generation where the energy generated is used primarily at the electric customer's location (third party ownership is allowed). This program is a part of New York State Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) Customer Sided Tier and is administered by New York State Energy Research and Development (NYSERDA). Applications for funding are being received until December 31, 2015, or until the funds are fully committed. Any project applications received after the fund has been exhausted will be held in a queue for next round of funding.


Eligibility


Customer eligibility is generally limited to those that that pay the RPS surcharge on their electric bills (i.e., customers of the state's major investor-owned utilities). The electricity generated under the program will be counted towards the Customer-Sited Tier (CST) portion of the state RPS. Potential applicants who are considering building an ADG-to-Electricity project can reach out the program to request free technical assistance for project development.


Program Description


A total of $57 million has been authorized to fund incentive payments for the entire program until 2015. The current PON 2828 has the budget of $10.2 million for 2014 and $10.2 million for 2015. Maximum incentive payment is limited to $2 million per Anaerobic Digester Gas (ADG) system.


The total incentive available under the current PON 2828 includes several elements. Incentives can be calculated through the Incentive Calculation Tool available at NYSERDA website. Capacity based incentives include distinct incentives for the digester and generator components of a system, as well as certain additional system components or capabilities. In summary, the available incentives are as follows (see PON 2828 for further details):


  • Capacity Incentive: Capacity incentive is provided to offset the capital costs of installing a system. Different amount of capacity incentive is available depending on the design, construction, and type of system. Capacity incentive has two components- fixed base element and a variable element. Fixed base element range from $100,000 to $50,000, and is provided as a standard incentive depending on the system type. Variable capacity incentive ranges from $1,500 to $750 per KWh of power generation capacity. Additional capacity incentives are available for other project enhanced components including Black start capability, Hydrogen sulfide reduction, design to accept food waste and others.
  • Performance-Based Incentive: $0.025/kilowatt-hour (kWh) up to 10 years of verified electricity production using a 75% capacity factor. Applicant also have the option for applying for additional incentives available for H2S (Hydrogen sulfide) gas reduction processes. Incentives ranging from $0.0023/kWh- $0.004/kWh may be available depending on the type of system used for H2S reduction.
  • Project Enhancement Incentive: Additional incentives are available for systems designed with additional features such as Black Start Capability, Hydrogen sulfide removal, design to accept food waste, and others.
  • Interconnection Incentive: This incentive is provided to offset the costs related to Coordinated Electric System Interconnection Review (CESIR) process and implementation of grid connection. CESIR process is required for projects with installed capacity of 50kW to 2MW. Incentive is available to cover 75% of the CESIR costs exceeding $5,000 up to $50,000.
NYSERDA counts the environmental attributes associated with energy production by funded systems towards the state RPS target for the life of the system. For further program details, including application materials and information on additional requirements, visit the program web site listed at the top of this page.
Angel Investment Credit (New Mexico) Personal Tax Incentives State/Province A taxpayer who files a New Mexico income tax return and who is a “qualified investor” may take a tax credit of up to $25,000 (25% of a qualified investment of not more than $100,000) for an investment made in a New Mexico company that is engaging in high-technology research or manufacturing. The taxpayer may claim the angel investment credit for up to two qualified investments in a taxable year, provided that each investment is in a different qualified business. Any portion of the tax credit remaining unused at the end of the taxpayer’s taxable year may be carried forward for three consecutive years.
Animal Agriculture Compliance Act (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province Sections of this chapter (311-312) describe the minimum manure management requirements to be followed by owners of livestock confinement feeding operations.
Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland) Grant Program State/Province A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology Fund, which provides funding opportunities for the research, development, implementation, and market development of technology intended to (a) reduce the amount of nutrients in animal waste, (b) alter the composition of animal waste, (c) develop alternative waste management strategies, or (d) use animal waste in a production process. Funds may be granted to individuals or businesses.
Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri) Loan Program State/Province The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan proceeds may be used to finance 100% of the cost of an eligible animal waste treatment system.
Anne Arundel County - High Performance Dwelling Property Tax Credit (Maryland) Property Tax Incentive Local The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if they choose to do so. In October 2010 Anne Arundel exercised this option by enacting legislation (County Bill 78-10) providing a property tax credit for high performance dwellings built on or after July 1, 2010 that meet or exceed USGBC LEED Silver standards. The credit was amended in 2012 (County Bill 03-12) to add the National Green Building Standard (NGBS) as an eligible green building certification system for the tax credit. The tax credit is available for five years and is calculated as a percentage of the county property taxes owed on the dwelling (but not the land). The incentive amount and maximum incentive vary according to the performance level of the building as determined under the applicable rating system, as follows:


  • LEED or NGBS Silver: 40% of taxes owned up to $1,000
  • LEED or NGBS Gold: 60% of taxes owed up to $2,000
  • LEED Platinum or NGBS Emerald: 80% of taxes owed up to $3,000
Those wishing to claim the tax credit must provide documentation proving that the dwelling meets the standard, which must be reviewed and approved by a professional certified in the applicable building standard that is employed or engaged by the county. The applicant must also certify that the dwelling and systems will be regularly maintained to comply with the applicable standard. Properties may be inspected to verify compliance with the tax credit rules.
Anne Arundel County - Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local Includes zoning provisions for small wind systems.
Renewable Operating Permits (ROP,Title V) (Michigan) Fees State/Province The Renewable Operating Permit (ROP) is required by Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The ROP program clarifies the requirements that apply to a facility that emits air contaminants. Any facility in Michigan that has the potential to emit 10 tons per year of any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP), 25 tons per year of any combination of HAPs, or 100 tons per year of any other regulated air contaminant is considered a "major source," and is subject to the ROP program.

The ROP pulls together all of the requirements into a single document giving the facility, state and local regulatory agencies, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), and the public a better picture of air emissions at a facility. Thus all Permits to Install and any other applicable air quality requirements will be incorporated into one permit.

A ROP does not add any new requirements; however, many facilities have to establish new monitoring systems to demonstrate compliance with emission limits and material usage limits. Once an emission source receives a ROP, the burden of proof is shifted from the regulatory agency to the emission source. It becomes the emission source's responsibility to determine whether a violation has occurred and report the findings. Therefore, facilities must track their compliance with state and federal air quality requirements and make reports to the regulatory agencies.
Antidegration Implementation Methods Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province This environmental regulation is an addition to the Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water regulations. It separates Mississippi's water into 3 tiers. Tier 1 waters are those waters in which the existing water quality does not support designated uses. Tier 2 waters are those waters in which the water quality meets or exceeds the mandatory minimum levels to support the Clean Water Act (CWA) goal of propagation of fish, shellfish, and wildlife, and recreation in and on such waters. Tier 3 waters are those high quality waters that constitute Outstanding National Resource Waters (ONRWs). Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) will decide which tier applies to state water based on provided information. All existing uses must be maintained and protected in all water of the State regardless of whether they are considered a Tier 1,2, or 3 water. All waters in Mississippi are considered to be tier 2 waters unless otherwise noted. The methods that the State will use to implement the antidegredation policy include the following components: A determination of the impact of the discharge upon state waters, alternative analysis, socio-economic issues, a preliminary State antidegredation decision, public review/input, and a final State decision. A report regarding compliance with the antidegredation policy shall be conducted for all or new expanding wastewater discharges into Mississippi surface waters that require an NPDES permit. This Notice of Intent (NOI) to discharge will be reviewed by the MDEQ. The applicant must provide the following in their NOI application: Alternative Analysis, Socio-Economic Impacts Analysis.
Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact (Maryland) Environmental Regulations State/Province This legislation authorizes Maryland's entrance into the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, which seeks to promote interstate cooperation for the proper management and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The Commission that administers the compact is also responsible for conducting research and recommending regulations pertaining to radioactive waste. The states of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia are party to this compact. The compact is designed so that each state in turn assumes the responsibility of the host state for the receipt and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. Pennsylvania is currently the host state.
Application Filing Requirements for Natural Gas Pipeline Construction Projects (Wisconsin) Siting and Permitting State/Province Any utility proposing to construct a natural gas pipeline requiring a Certificate of Authority (CA) under Wis. Stat. §196.49 must prepare an application for Commission review.  These regulations list the information needed for all CA applications, which includes detailed route information and potential environmental impacts. More extensive construction projects may require additional information contained in the application filing requirements (AFR) for pipeline projects.  The AFR also includes information requirements for obtaining wetland or waterway crossing permits from the Department of Natural Resources when coordinated reviews are required under Wis. Stat. §30.025.
Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Siting and Permitting Utility Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility.

An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public.

The applicant shall conduct a project area site selection study prior to submitting an application for a wind-powered electric generation facility. The study shall be designed to evaluate all practicable project area sites for the proposed facility. Information on the location, major features, and the topographic, geologic, and hydrologic suitability of the proposed project area site and any proposed alternative project area site(s) shall be submitted by the applicant.

For detailed requirements for the project summary and siting study, please see: http://www.puc.state.oh.us/emplibrary/files/legal/rules/chapters/4906-17.doc
Application Filling Requirements for Transmission Line and Substation Construction Projects (Wisconsin) Siting and Permitting State/Province This page describes application requirements for all projects that involve the installation of an electricity transmission line or substation that also require either a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) or a Certificate of Authority (CA). Applications must include a discussion of general route impacts, distances to sensitive buildings, impacts on residences and commercial and industrial buildings, and impacts on public and tribal lands.
Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) Siting and Permitting Utility An applicant for a certificate to site a major electric power, gas, or natural gas transmission facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public. The applicant shall provide a statement explaining the need for the proposed facility, including a listing of the factors upon which it relied to reach that conclusion and references to the most recent long-term forecast report (if applicable).
Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Siting and Permitting Utility An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public.

The applicant shall state the current and proposed ownership status of the proposed facility, including site(s), rights-of-way, structures, and equipment. Such information shall include type of ownership.

The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. Where appropriate, the applicant may substitute all or portions of documents filed to meet federal, state, or local regulations. Existing data may be substituted for physical measurements.
Appropriation of Water (North Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province This section describes procedures for applications to appropriate water for beneficial uses, including irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. Once granted, water users must continue to seek permission for changes to their specific permit conditions. A permit will be issued if all of the following conditions are met: (1) The rights of a prior appropriator will not be unduly affected. (2) The proposed means of diversion or construction are adequate. (3) The proposed use of water is beneficial. (4) The proposed appropriation is in the public interest. In determining the public interest, all of the following will be considered: (a) The benefit to the applicant resulting from the proposed appropriation. (b) The effect of the economic activity resulting from the proposed appropriation. (c) The effect on fish and game resources and public recreational opportunities. (d) The effect of loss of alternate uses of water that might be made within a reasonable time if not precluded or hindered by the proposed appropriation. (e) Harm to other persons resulting from the proposed appropriation. (f) The intent and ability of the applicant to complete the appropriation.
Appropriation or Use of Waters, Reservoirs, and Dams (Maryland) Environmental Regulations State/Province It is state policy to control the use and appropriation of ground and surface waters of the state. A permit from the Department of the Environment is required prior to the construction or operation of any plant, building, or structure that will appropriate or use any waters of the state. The applicant must provide the Department that the proposed water withdrawal will not jeopardize the State's natural water resources. Some exemptions – including for domestic water use, agricultural use of less than 10,000 gallons per day on average, and groundwater use of 5,000 gallons of water per day or less – apply. Permits from the Department are likewise required prior to the construction, alteration, or repair of any reservoir, dam, or waterway obstruction. Some exemptions apply. This legislation contains additional information on exemptions, required information notices and public hearings, Department considerations in acting on permit applications, measuring and reporting of water use, compliance, and additional regulations.
Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) and the Water Regulations provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to alter the bed, bank or boundary of any water body or water course; to remove or add any material to the bed, bank or boundary of any water body or watercourse; or to remove vegetation from the bed, bank or boundary or any water body or water course. Aquatic Habitat Protection Permits are issued by the Water Security Agency (WSA). Authorizations may also be required from other agencies. Exemptions for some types of work are available, and are being developed by the WSA.
Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut) Siting and Permitting State/Province These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe application procedures for requesting an exemption for a given activity. Regulated activities include the storage of hazardous material; repair or maintenance requiring the use, storage, or disposal of hazardous materials; wastewater discharges other than domestic sewage water and stormwater; generation of electrical power with fossil fuels other than natural gas or propane; and storage, handling, recycling, disposal, reduction, processing, or composting of solid waste.
Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Arkansas Air Pollution Control code is adopted pursuant to Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101). ) By authority of the same State law, the Commission has also adopted Regulation 19, Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Regulation 19) and Regulation 26, Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Regulation 26) which deal exclusively with regulations compelled by federal mandates and which are to some extent federally enforceable. It is the specific intent of Regulation 18 to preclude federal enforceability of Regulation 18 requirements. Regulation 18 permits or permit conditions issued under its authority, or enforcement issues arising from Regulation 18 shall not be deemed to be federally enforceable.

No person shall cause or permit the operation, construction or modification of a stationary source, which actually emits: 75 tons per year or more of carbon monoxide; 40 tons per year or more of nitrogen oxides; 40 tons per year or more of sulfur dioxide; 40 tons per year or more of volatile organic compounds; 25 tons per year or more of particulate matter; 15 tons per year or more of PM100.5 tons per year or more of lead; 2.0 ton per year or more of any single hazardous air pollutant; 5.0 tons per year or more of any combination of hazardous air pollutants; or 25 tons per year or more of any other air contaminant without first obtaining a permit from the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). Application of a permit shall be made on such forms and contain such information as the Department may reasonably require, including but not limited to: (1) information on the nature and amounts of air pollutants to be emitted by the stationary source or by associated mobile sources; and (2) such information on the location, design, and operation of stationary source as the Department may reasonably require.

No person shall cause or permit the operation, construction, or modification of a stationary source, whose actual emissions are: 40 tons per year or more but less than 75 tons per year of carbon monoxide; 25 tons per year or more but less than 40 tons per year of nitrogen oxides; 25 tons per year or more but less than 40 tons per year of sulfur dioxide; 25 tons per year or more but less than 40 tons per year of volatile organic compounds; 15 tons per year or more but less than 25 tons per year of particulate matter; 10 tons per year or more but less than 15 tons per year of PM10; 1.0 ton per year or more but less than 2 tons per year of any single hazardous air pollutant; or 3.0 tons per year or more but less than 5 tons per year of an combination of hazardous air pollutants without first having registered the source with the Department. Such registration shall be made on such forms and contain such information as the Department may reasonably require, including but not limited to: ) the name and address of the facility; an estimate of emissions from the facility; and an explanation of how the emissions estimate was determined.

These regulations also list the monitoring, sampling, and reporting requirements which will be no less stringent than the federally mandated requirements.

If there is any shutdown, startup, breakdown, interruption of fuel supply the operator of the permitted facility must report to the Director within 24 hours.
Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act authorizes the state to develop, adopt, issue and amend rules and regulations pertaining to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. These regulations are consistent with, but no more restrictive that the federal regulations set forth in the Surface Mining and Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) Surface Mining and Reclamation Division (SMRD) is the authority under this act. Regulation No. 20 from the ADEQ sets performance and reclamation standards.

The surface coal mining permit is active for up to five years. Work cannot begin until all the permitting requirements are met, public notice periods are completed and the permit is issued. Operators must complete reclamation upon expiration of the permit. A bond is posted to cover reclamation costs if an operator fails to reclaim the site to standards set in Regulation No. 20. A fee is assessed on coal mined in the United States and is placed in a trust fund that is used for reclamation of pre-law abandoned mine sites. The federal Mine Safety and Health Administration regulates safety and health issues for coal mine employees.

Under this Act an operator of a coal mine must submit the following application materials: Collateral Bond Agreement, Collateral Bond Form, Surety Bond, Irrevocable Letter of Credit, Coal Mining Application/Permit and, Memo from AR Board for Prof. Geologists on Interpretation and Analysis. In addition all coal mining operators must follow the Revegetation Success Standards outlined by the ADEQ.
Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (UIC code) is adopted pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-5-11). It is the purpose of this UIC Code to adopt underground injection control (UIC)

regulations necessary to qualify the State of Arkansas to retain authorization for its Underground Injection Control Program pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended; 42 USC 300f et seq. In order to retain program authorization, it is necessary for the Arkansas Pollution Control and Ecology Commission to have regulations as stringent as the federal program administered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The following regulations are adopted and made part of the UIC code: 40 CFR part 144, 40 CFR part 145, 40 CFR part 12 subpart A, 40 CFR 146 Subparts A, B, D, E, F and G. The Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission (AOGC) has authority over Class II and Class V bromine related wells, and shares enforcement authority with ADEQ of the Class V bromine wells as recognized in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Department, the AOGC and the EPA.

No person shall construct, install, alter, modify, or operate any underground injection facility without a permit from the Department or, as to Class II and Class V bromine-related brine disposal wells, from the Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission. No person shall construct, install, or operate a Class IV well. No person shall construct, install, alter, modify or operate any underground injection facility contrary to the terms and conditions of a permit or of any provision of this UIC Code or the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act, as amended (the Act). Any person who violates any provision of this UIC Code shall be subject to the penalties as provided in the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act, Ark. Code Ann. § 8-4-103.

This Regulation goes onto to classify wells into 5 categories (I-V) based on their function.
Arlington County - Green Building Incentive Program (Virginia) Green Building Incentive Local

The Green Building Density Incentive program allows the County Board of Arlington to consider a modification of use regulations for additional density between .20 and .45 FAR for office buildings and between .25 and .50 FAR for residential buildings and/or additional height up to 3 stories for special exception site plan requests. The site plan proposal must guarantee a minimum level of energy savings and a LEED rating at the Silver, Gold or Platinum level, for the bonus to be approved. An additional 0.10 FAR may be awarded to buildings that commit to LEED certification and minimum energy savings plus either ENERGY STAR building certification or LEED for Existing Buildings (LEED-EB) certification.

The minimum level of energy savings for office and commercial projects is 20% above the baseline ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard as defined under LEED EA Credit 1 – Optimize Energy Performance in the LEED 2009 rating system. The minimum level of energy savings for residential development is 18% above the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 baseline. All project owners will also be asked to provide ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager utility reporting data after occupancy each year for 10 years.

The provision of LEED-certified green building components does not guarantee additional density and/or height, or any particular amount of density or height. The FAR bonuses are the maximum allowed for each level of LEED certification. Site plan requests for bonus density and/or height will be analyzed on a case-by-case basis based on the characteristics of individual sites.

Developers who participate in the site plan process (meaning their projects are special exceptions to the Zoning Ordinance) and do not agree to achieve official LEED certification are required to contribute $0.045/sq ft. The Green Building Fund is used to provide education and outreach to developers and the community on green building issues. If the building later receives LEED certification, the fee will be refunded. Those projects that agree to achieve LEED certification do not have to contribute.

Article 3J Tax Credits (North Carolina) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province Article 3J Tax Credits can be used to offset up to 50% of a taxpayer’s state income and/or franchise tax liability. The credits are offered for businesses which create fulltime jobs, invest in capital infrastructure, or invest at least $10 million in real property and create at least 200 new jobs. Projects located within designated municipalities (Urban Progress Zones) or designated counties (Agrarian Growth Zones) may receive enhanced Article 3J credits.
Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance (North Carolina) Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Local In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained. This policy was adopted in the context of an ongoing debate over the legal interpretation of the 1983 Ridge Protection Act.

For the purposes of this ordinance, wind-energy systems are classified as “large” if they consist of one or more turbines with a rated generating capacity of more than 20 kilowatts (kW) and “small” if a project consists of a single turbine rated at less than 20 kW.* A site permit is required to establish, place, operate, maintain, expand or enlarge a wind energy system.

Height Requirements: The total height of a wind turbine is determined by the height above grade to the tip of the turbine blade as it reaches its highest elevation. Small wind turbines are restricted to a 135-foot height limit and large systems to a 199-foot height limit. This latter height is based on Federal Aviation Administration regulations requiring lighting to warn aircraft of air space hazards. Large wind energy systems are also prohibited from rising above the vegetative canopy of protected mountain ridges by more than 35 feet. Protected ridges are defined as those on mountains rising more than 500 feet above adjacent valley floors.

Visual Appearance: Towers and rotor blades must be painted or finished so as to conform to their surroundings and reduce visual obtrusiveness. Wind systems must also remain free from signage, advertising, flags, streamers, and other decorative items. Electric wiring for the turbines, “insofar as possible,” must be placed underground.

Setbacks: The ordinance generally requires that large wind systems must be set back at least 1,000 feet from neighboring property lines. Wind systems must also be set back from public and private roads a distance of at least 1.5 times the height of the tallest turbine on the property. Large wind-energy systems must comply with state and federal requirements for setbacks from streams, creeks, branches, rivers and other surface waters.

Noise Requirements: The aggregate noise or audible sound of a large wind system must not exceed five decibels above the existing average noise level of the surrounding area and is restricted to a maximum of 45 decibels measured outside the property lines that contain the wind system.

Building Permit Requirements: A building permit is required, and building permit applications for wind-energy systems must be accompanied by standard drawings of the turbine structure, including the tower, base and footings. An engineering analysis of the tower certified by a licensed professional engineer, including standards for ice/wind loading, must also be submitted. (This analysis may be supplied by the manufacturer.)

Impact Analysis, Mitigation, and Planning: Applications for large wind-energy projects must include the following: building and electrical permits; site and design information; construction, operation, maintenance and insurance information; decommissioning information; a comprehensive third-party impact analysis and all other relevant permits and approvals. All applicants must also undergo a public hearing so that the county planning board may receive comments and other information pertinent to the application.

* Multiple small wind energy systems located on farms are considered to be separate small wind-energy systems even if the aggregate rated capacity exceeds 20 kW, provided that the primary intent is to generate power to reduce on-site consumption.
Assessment of Farmland Hosting Renewable Energy Systems (New Jersey) Property Tax Incentive State/Territory In New Jersey, under the Farmland Assessment Act, farmland actively devoted to an agricultural or horticultural use is assessed at its productivity value. This practice generally results in a lower tax burden for farmland owners compared to residential or commercial land owners. In January 2010 New Jersey enacted legislation (S.B. 1538), which among other things clarifies how farmland used for biomass, solar, and wind energy generation should be treated under the Farmland Assessment Act. Ultimately, the law states that the addition of a biomass, solar, or wind energy generating system to land that was assessed and taxed as farmland during the prior tax year does not automatically preclude the land from continuing to qualify for this treatment. Instead, the law sets a series of conditions that must be met in order for the land to continue to be assessed as farmland, as follows:*


  • The land must be part operating farm for the current year and have been part of an operating farm during the preceding year.
  • The power and heat generated by the system must generally, but not exclusively, be used to serve farm energy needs.
  • A conservation plan must be filed with and approved by the conservation district.
  • For solar energy systems, the property under the panels must be used to the greatest extent practical for shade crops, pasture, or grazing.
  • The ratio land devoted to energy production to land devoted to agricultural operations may not exceed 1:5 acres (i.e., maximum 1 acre devoted to energy production for every 5 acres devoted to agricultural operations).
  • Facilities are limited in size to the lesser of 10 acres or 2 megawatts (MW) of generating capacity.
  • For biomass generation, the property owner must obtain approval from the New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

Income generated from the sale of heat or power generated by solar, wind, biomass facilities is not considered income for the purposes of meeting eligibility requirements for assessment, valuation, and taxation under the Farmland Assessment Act. However, there is no income requirement for land assessed according to the terms described in the law. Any qualifying generation equipment installed in pinelands remains subject to the Pinelands Protection Act.

For the purposes of this law, the definition of land used for energy production does not include land devoted to the production of biomass fuels used in a biomass energy generation facility. Biomass is defined as "an agricultural crop, crop residue, or agricultural byproduct that is cultivated, harvested, or produced on the farm, or directly obtained from a farm where it was cultivated, harvested, or produced, and which can be used to generate energy in a sustainable manner." Any farmland used for solar, wind, or biomass energy generation that does not meet the criteria defined in the law may not be assessed as land devoted to agricultural or horticultural use under the Farmland Assessment Act.


*It is also important to note that S.B. 1538 prescribes several other criteria for determining whether it is permissible to construct energy generation facilities on preserved farmland. Among these criteria are requirements that energy production facilities not interfere with farm production; be limited in size to that needed to meet no more than 110% of on-site energy needs; and not occupy more than 1% of the total area of the farm, including both preserved and non-preserved portions.
Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (Multiple States) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the region. The states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and South Carolina are party to this compact.
Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program (Tennesse) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials section of the Tennessee Code covers all of the regulations, licenses, permits, siting requirements, and practices relevant to a nuclear energy development. In addition to the Tennessee Code the Department of Environment and Conservation has a rule pertaining to the licensing and registration of sources of radiation. The Department's rules state that any contractor or subcontractor of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is exempt from the Department's rules to the extent that such contractor or subcontractor under his contract receives, possesses, uses and transfers or acquires sources of radiation. Thus, due to the DOE's heavy involvement in the licensing, permitting and compliance of nuclear power plants, any project being considered is most likely to be exempt from the Department’s rule. The licenses required are pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 compiled at (42 U.S.C. § 2011).

Every person receiving ownership or possession of one (1) or more radiation machines shall register with the radiological health service within ten (10) days of such receipt on forms to be provided for this purpose.

Any change in ownership, location, or use of any radiation machine, or any extension, modification, alteration or termination of such machine for any person required to register under this part, constitutes a revocation of such existing registration. Such person will then be required to register with the radiological health service.

These rules and regulations give the Director of the Department he power to change any of the rules if necessary. It also requires that all forms submitted to the DOE or Nuclear Regulatory Commission be submitted to the Department as well.
Atomic Energy and Radiation Control Act (South Carolina) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Division of State Development within the Department of Commerce is responsible for the promotion and development of atomic energy in the state, and is authorized to enact relevant rules and regulations. The South Carolina Budget and Control Board may finance projects or lease lands for atomic energy development. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for the control and regulation of radiation sources that are not licensed by the Federal Government, as well as for the transportation of radioactive materials.
Atomic Radiation (Illinois) Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
State/Province This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.
City of Austin - Green Power Purchasing (Texas) Green Power Purchasing Local Under the Austin Climate Protection Plan, the City Council has set numerous goals for renewable energy, energy efficiency, and carbon emission reductions with the overall goal of making Austin a national leader in local climate change mitigation policy. Included in this larger goal is a goal of powering all city facilities with renewable energy by 2012. According to the EPA Green Power Partners, the city of Austin procures 100% of its electricity from green power (374,086,079 kilowatt hours). Interestingly, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) is one of the largest subscribers to the Austin Energy GreenChoice program since 2003, when it made a commitment to purchase 30% of its electricity from renewable sources, totaling 45,000-48,000 MWh annually. According to the October 2012 EPA Green Power Partner update, the AISD's most recent renewable energy purchase of 20,080 MWh comprises 13% of its total electricity consumption, and ranks 2nd nationally among K-12 school purchases. In comparison, the City of Austin's renewable energy purchase ranks 3rd nationally. As an independent entity, the AISD green power purchases are separate from those made by the city of Austin and the AISD is not governed by the City municipal facility goal.
City of Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard (Texas) Renewables Portfolio Standard Local The City of Austin, Texas, has been an early adopter of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) regulatory incentive. Using long term planning strategies, the City has set annual benchmarks for the percentage of renewable energy it uses annually. In February 2007, the Austin City Council approved Resolution 20070215-023, adopting the mayor's Climate Protection Plan. The Resolution increased Austin's renewable portfolio goal to 30% by 2020, with 100 MW required to come from solar. The resolution also sets a green power procurement goal, with the plan to power municipal buildings and facilities using 100% renewable energy by 2012. In February 2011, the city council approved Austin Energy's updated Resource, Generation and Climate Protection Plan, thereby increasing the portfolio goal to 35% by 2020 and doubling the solar requirement from 100 MW to 200 MW. See the Final Report on Austin Energy’s Strategy for 200 MW of solar generation per Resolution No. 20110804-027 from November 2011 for updated information on how Austin plans to meet its ambitious goals.

Other requirements established by the Climate Protection resolution include:

Other requirements established by the Climate Protection resolution include:

  • Making the entire City fleet of vehicles carbon neutral by 2020,
  • Developing and implementing departmental climate protection plans,
  • Developing an employee climate protection education program,
  • Achieving 700 MW of new savings through energy efficiency and conservation efforts by 2020,
  • Establishing a CO2 cap and developing a reduction plan for existing utility emissions,
  • Achieving carbon neutrality on any new carbon-based generation facilities, and
  • Implementing aggressive building codes to maximize energy efficiency.
History

The City of Austin has a long history of supporting the development of renewable energy resources. In February 1999, the Austin City Council adopted Resolution No. 990211-36, which set a goal for Austin Energy to achieve 5% of the energy in its portfolio mix from renewable resources by December 31, 2004. Renewable resources include those that rely on energy derived directly from the sun, on wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, wave or tidal energy, or on biomass or biomass-based waste products, including landfill gas. Funding to achieve the 5% increase in renewable energy resources was authorized to be provided by Austin Energy's green pricing program -- GreenChoice -- initiated in 2000. Residential and business customers can opt to have the standard (fossil) fuel charge on their electric bill replaced entirely by the GreenChoice power charge, which will remain fixed for 10 years.

In September 2003, the Austin City Council approved a resolution to ensure that Austin Energy continues to meet the community's demand for clean energy beyond 2004. Resolution 030925-02 directed the utility to execute a Memorandum of Understanding with the World Wildlife Fund that included a goal to achieve a 20% renewable energy component in its energy mix, an increase in energy efficiency of 15% by 2020, and support of binding limits on national power sector CO2 emissions. Subsequently, in December 2003, the Austin City Council unanimously approved Austin Energy’s 10-year Strategic Plan, which among other initiatives, included elements to comply with the council’s energy policy resolutions. Objective 5 of the plan sets a renewables portfolio standard of 20% by 2020. Austin Energy also committed to develop 15 megawatts (MW) of solar generating capacity by 2007, increasing to 100 megawatts by 2020, increasing it again in 2011 to 200 MW by 2020.
Austin Energy - Commercial Solar PV Incentive Program (Texas) Performance-Based Incentive Utility Austin Energy offers a performance-based incentive to customers with a commercial account number for electricity generated by qualifying photovoltaic (PV) systems of up to 200 kilowatts (kW)-AC. The incentive rate is currently set at $0.09 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) locked for a 10-year term, but the maximum incentive cannot exceed 80% of the PV system invoice cost. Systems rated up to 20 kW-AC are also eligible for net metering.


In order to qualify for this program, PV modules must be new and be listed on the California Energy Commission's Go Solar web site. In addition, all solar panels must have a 20-year manufacturer warranty, all inverters must have a 10-year manufacturer warranty, and all systems must have a 10-year installer's warranty. Licensed electrical contractors must obtain the appropriate permits and perform all electrical connections.
Austin Energy - Net Metering (Texas) Net Metering Utility Austin Energy, the municipal utility of Austin Texas, offers net metering for renewable energy systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) to its non-residential retail electricity customers. The definition of renewable includes solar*, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, wave and tidal energy, biomass, and biomass-based waste products, including landfill gas. Systems must be used primarily to offset a portion or all of a customer's on-site electric load. Metering is accomplished using a single meter capable of registering the flow of electricity in both directions (delivered and received) to determine net energy flows.

Customers that generate more electricity than they consume during a monthly billing period will receive a credit for net excess generation (NEG) at the appropriate avoided cost rate. The amount of the credit is calculated by multiplying the net kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity fed into the grid by the current fuel charge; or, if the customer participates in the utility's GreenChoice program, each kWh delivered by the customer to the utility's electric system in excess of the kWh delivered by the utility is multiplied by the appropriate Green Power Charge. See the Austin Energy Rates Summary for more information.

All systems must meet the requirements of Austin Energy's interconnection guidelines and the customer is responsible for all interconnection costs. Interconnection agreements have a minimum term of one year, unless the customer is a participant in the Austin Energy Solar PV Rebate Program, in which case the minimum term is five years. Agreements will be renewed automatically each year unless terminated by either party (requires 60-day written notice).

*Austin Energy offers the Value of Solar rate for residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. This tariff replaces net billing for residential solar PV systems no larger than 20 kilowatts (kW) and provides a larger annual cost savings to customers than if they had net metering available.
Austin Energy - Residential Solar Loan Program (Texas) Utility Loan Program Utility Austin Energy offers two types of loans for residential customers to finance solar energy systems in eligible homes:


  • Solar water heater loans are available for up to $5,000 for single family and $10,000 for duplexes. (A customer can choose either the loan or the rebate incentive for solar water heaters, but not both.)
  • Solar PV loans are available for up to $20,000, which may be combined with Austin Energy solar PV rebates.

Terms for Austin Energy solar loans are 3, 5, 7, or 10 years. All work must be done by a program-approved contractor.


For loan pre-approval with Austin Energy's financing partner, customers can contact Velocity Credit Union.
Austin Energy - Residential Solar PV Rebate Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility Austin Energy's Solar Rebate Program offers a $1.10 per watt incentive to eligible residential customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their property. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per home installation (not to exceed 80% of the total invoice) and a lifetime maximum of $50,000 per residential site. Residential customers are billed for their whole house energy consumption at standard residential rates and then credited at the current Value of Solar Rate ($0.107 per kilowatt-hour), with monthly net excess generation rolled over to the next month.

Rebates will only be paid for approved systems installed by approved solar contractors according to the established technical requirements. All systems must conform to the utility's equipment and installation standards in order to qualify for a rebate. These standards include the use of pre-approved equipment; equipment warranty requirements; and the use of a program-approved, NABCEP-certified, and appropriately insured solar installer. Participants must meet a detailed set of home energy efficiency requirements in order to qualify for a solar rebate.


Renewable Energy Credits and other environmental credits associated with renewable energy generated from the system belong to Austin Energy.
Austin Utilities - Solar Rebate Program (Minnesota) Utility Rebate Program Utility Austin Utilities provides incentives for their residential and commercial customers to install photovoltaic (PV) and solar water heating systems. Qualifying PV systems can earn 50¢ per watt; eligible solar water heating systems can earn $15 per square foot of collector area. Incentives are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Austin Utilities obtains the right to withdraw the program at any time without notice.

In order to obtain eligibility, customers must agree to a net-metering and interconnection contract with Austin Utilities. An energy audit must be performed prior to system installation and results shared with Austin Utilities.

Application forms with additional information are available on the program web site.
Authorization of Line Extension (Nebraska) Line Extension Analysis State/Province Any entity permitted to establish an electric light and power plant, and/or transmission or distribution lines within a city, village, or public electric light and power district, may also extend said power plant and transmission or distribution lines beyond the boundaries of the municipality or district. Some exemptions apply. The remainder of this section provides additional regulations for the operation and interconnection of electric light and power plants and distribution lines.
Baltimore County - Property Tax Credit for High Performance Buildings and Homes (Maryland) Property Tax Incentive Local The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if they choose to do so. Baltimore County exercised this option in 2006 by creating property tax credits for new and existing multi-family residential (50+ units) and commercial buildings that meet certain high performance building standards. In 2008, the county also adopted a similar provision creating property tax credits for newly constructed high performance homes, and in 2010 added provisions for energy efficiency improvements in existing homes.

The credit is formulated as a percentage (%) reduction in total county real property taxes assessed on the property over the course of several years. The level and duration of the allowable credit varies according to building type and level of performance. The non-residential property tax credits are based wholly on achieving a specified rating and certification under the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED green building rating system. The property tax credit for homes also uses green building rating systems as a qualification standard, but includes an additional track that allows a home to qualify for a credit based on its level of efficiency as compared to an energy use baseline. The credit for high performance homes originally required a minimum LEED for Homes rating, but the law was amended during 2012 to allow homes rated under the the International Code Council (ICC) NGBS to qualify. Both standards include not only single-family homes, but also attached housing, and low-rise (up to 6 stories), multi-family condominiums and rental housing. The table below summarizes the different tax credit levels and durations for different building types.

Commercial and Multi-family Residential (income producing, 50+ units)


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Baltimore County - Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credit (Maryland) Property Tax Incentive Local The allocated budget for this program has been met. There is now a wait list for new credits. The wait for applications not yet received is expected to last until at least July 2015. Md. Property Tax Article § 9-203 allows local governments to offer property tax credits for energy conservation devices if they choose to do so. This credit, available only for residential buildings, is set at the lesser of 50% of the cost of the system or $5,000 for heating devices and $1,500 for devices that supply hot water. There is no dollar limit on credits for PV or cooling systems, although the credit claimed each year cannot exceed the amount of county property taxes owed during that year. Excess credits can be carried over for 2 years.
Baltimore County - Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local Provides permitting process for anemometers only (not turbines)
Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota) Environmental Regulations Local The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to provide for an equitable division of such waters. Water use and development projects on lands inside the basin are subject to this compact.
Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Grant Program State/Province The Ben Franklin Technology Partner's Challenge Grant and Alternative Energy Development Program (AEDP) provides funds to businesses through the four Ben Franklin Technology Partners for access to capital, business expertise, technology commercialization services to advance the development of new technologies and for the generation, conservation, and transportation of alternative and clean energy. The BFTDA Centers receive funding to award to entrepreneurs, start-up and early-stage companies, established companies, investors, higher education and research and BFTP alumni companies. Grants may be used for direct company investments, business and technical support, technology and entrepreneurial infrastructure, and administrative expenses. For further information and program requirements, please see the guidelines: BenFranklinTechnologyPartners_Guidelines_10-2.pdf.
Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Grant Program State/Province The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal government on behalf of any business may apply. The funding limit of the program is $5,000 per new qualifying job created or $7,500 per qualifying job created in a high poverty county. A dollar for dollar match (or 50% match in a high poverty county) is required of businesses looking to qualify for program funds.
Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Corporate) (Maryland) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory Maryland allows individuals and corporations to take an income tax credit of $0.03/gallon for purchases of biodiesel used for space heating or water heating. The maximum credit is $500 per year. It may not be refunded or carried over to subsequent years. In order to qualify for the tax credit, the heating oil must be at least 5% biodiesel sourced from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved feedstocks or be accepted under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard. As originally enacted, the credit was only available for purchases made during the 2008 - 2012 tax years, but this was extended by 5 years through 2017 by S.B. 959 in May 2011. This legislation also modified the definition of qualifying heating oil to insert the language described above pertaining to approved feedstocks and the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard.


Please see the program web site for an application and instructions on claiming this tax credit.
Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal) (Maryland) Personal Tax Credit State/Territory Maryland allows individuals and corporations to take an income tax credit of $0.03/gallon for purchases of biodiesel used for space heating or water heating. The maximum credit is $500 per year. It may not be refunded or carried over to subsequent years. In order to qualify for the tax credit, the heating oil must be at least 5% biodiesel sourced from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved feedstocks or be accepted under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard. As originally enacted, the credit was only available for purchases made during the 2008 - 2012 tax years, but this was extended by 5 years through June 2018 by S.B. 959 in May 2011. This legislation also modified the definition of qualifying heating oil to insert the language described above pertaining to approved feedstocks and the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard.

Please see the program web site for an application and instructions on claiming this tax credit.
Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit (Kentucky) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province blended biodiesel does not qualify. The biodiesel tax credit is applied against the corporation income tax imposed under KRS 141.040 and/or the limited liability entity tax (LLET) imposed under KRS 141.0401. The amount of the tax credit claimed against the corporation income tax and LLET can be different. The total amount of credit for all biodiesel producers may not exceed the annual biodiesel tax credit cap of $10 million. Unused credits may not be carried forward. For the purpose of this credit, biodiesel must meet ASTM specification D6751. Renewable diesel is defined as a renewable, biodegradable, non-ester combustible liquid derived from biomass resources that meets ASTM specification D975 or D396. The Kentucky Administrative regulation KAR 15:140. Biodiesel tax credit outlines the credit information administered byKentucky Department of Revenue.
Bioeconomy Crop Initiative (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Rebate Program State/Province The Bioeconomy Crop Initiative was being offered by the P.E.I. Department of Agriculture through the Agricultural Flexibility Fund, a cost-sharing agreement between the Government of Canada and the Province of Prince Edward Island. The Bioeconomy Crop Initiative was an approximate $2.9 million dollar initiative that allowed Island farmers to pursue emerging market opportunities by producing crops for the bioeconomy while working to improve the environmental sustainability of the Province.

This initiative is part of the overall effort to increase the competitiveness of the agriculture sector.

The purpose of the Bioeconomy Crop Initiative is to identify the economic and environmental benefits of crops that will serve as platforms for the development of the provincial bioeconomy. Fall rye, perennial grasses, hybrid willows and other potential bioeconomy crops will be evaluated to progress towards the commercialization stage through a series of trials, demonstrations and pilot projects. Assistance is available through this program for producers, agri-businesses and agricultural industry organizations.

Perennial Biomass Development The preliminary evaluation of certain perennial grass and hybrid willows under P.E.I. conditions is necessary for the development of these two bioeconomy crops. It is anticipated that by the time the preliminary evaluations are complete, the particular role of these two crops in the bioeconomy will be more clearly defined. Technical assistance may be provided by staff from the Department of Agriculture for site preparation and monitoring of results. This program is not intended for crops to be planted in buffer zones and funding will not be provided for such activity.

Eligibility: • Applications will be accepted from primary producers, agriculture industry organizations and agribusinesses. • Applications are to be submitted at least sixty (60) days in advance of the intended date of planting the proposed crop. Late applications may be accepted if funding is not fully committed. • Applicants must agree to maintain the plantation site(s) until the end of the program in 2014. In the event of a crop failure or loss, a project may be terminated early upon mutual agreement of the applicant and the Department of Agriculture. • Applicants must agree to follow a management protocol that is mutually agreed upon by the applicant and the Department of Agriculture. This protocol may be modified upon mutual consent. Rate of assistance*: Funding will be provided on an annual basis. The level of funding differs for primary producers/agribusinesses and agriculture industry organizations. • 50% for primary producers and agribusinesses • Up to 100% for agriculture industry organizations Eligible expenses will include, but may not be limited to, the documented costs for:

• Site preparation, cost of seed, planting, crop maintenance and harvesting.
Bioenergy Grant Program State Grant Program State/Territory Note: This program is currently not accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future funding opportunities.

The Minnesota Legislature appropriated $2.5 million to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture for bioenergy grants in FY 2012. Eligible projects include:
1. Facilities that produce bioenergy, or that will produce bioenergy by June 30, 2013, including biomass-based transportation fuels, biomass-based commercial heat, industrial process heat, or electrical power.
2. Organizations that provide on-station, on-farm field-scale research and outreach, including those that develop and test crops used for bioenergy systems.
3. Non-governmental entities that provide business development services and structures for community ownership of bioenergy facilities.

Grants are limited to 50% of the total project cost, or $500,000. Applications for the third project type are limited to $150,000. Applicants must provide at least 25% of their cost match in cash. Applications for FY 2012 were due November 4th, 2011.
Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program (Illinois) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: The program is accepting applications until 5:00 pm on December 1, 2014.

The Renewable Energy Resources Program (RERP) promotes the development of renewable energy in Illinois. This program is funded by the Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund (RERTF)-- the state's public benefits fund -- and is administered by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO), with assistance from the Energy Resources Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The focus of the Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program, through the RERP, is to demonstrate the use of biogas and biomass for on-site energy generation at facilities in Illinois. Projects designed to use biogas or biomass as a source of fuel to produce electricity with combined heat and power (CHP) through gasification, co-firing or anaerobic digestion technologies are being targeted. The biogas and biomass grant program will provide a 50% cost-share for energy feasibility studies or for the installation of equipment for these purposes. The maximum grants available for feasibility studies, biogas projects, and biomass projects are $2,500, $225,000, and $500,000, respectively. All projects must be located in Illinois within the service areas of utilities that contribute to the RERTF (through a Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge). Applications are available on the program web site.
Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities. This legislation exempts biomass anaerobic digestion and biomass gasification facilities from regulation as a solid waste processing facility, unless otherwise determined by the Department.
Biomass Energy Production Incentive (South Carolina) Performance-Based Incentive State/Territory Note: New claimaints are only eligible to receive this credit through June 30th, 2018 and will not be eligible to receive the credit for a full five year term.


In 2007 South Carolina enacted the Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act, which provides production incentives for certain biomass-energy facilities. Eligible systems earn $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for electricity generated or $0.30 per therm (100,000 Btu) for energy produced from biomass resources. These incentives are available to systems that did not produce energy from biomass resources before June 30, 2008, or systems that increase production by at 25% over their greatest three-year average before June 30, 2008. The incentive payment is also applicable to energy from a qualifying facility placed in service and first producing energy on or after July 1, 2008. The maximum incentive is $100,000 per taxpayer per year. Incentives will be paid beginning on the date the system was placed in service. No incentives will be awarded after June 30, 2018. All claims will be paid from the state's general fund, and total claims may not exceed $2.1 million per fiscal year. As of August 2009, the South Carolina Department of Revenue had distributed $300,000 in payments. The incentive payment for the production of electricity or thermal energy may not be claimed for both electricity and energy produced from the same biomass resource.

For the purposes of this incentive, a biomass resource is defined as "wood, wood waste, agricultural waste, animal waste, sewage, landfill gas, and other organic materials, not including fossil fuels."

For more information about how to apply for the incentive, review the program application.
Biomass Energy Program (Alabama) State Grant Program State/Territory The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on loans to install approved biomass projects. Technical assistance is also available through the program.

Industrial, commercial and institutional facilities; agricultural property owners; and city, county, and state government entities are eligible. Interested parties must obtain loans from commercial lending institutions and submit repayment data to the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) for interest payment assistance. ADECA pays the borrower directly, based on documentation of payment. The interest rates on loans should be no greater than 2% above the prime rate.

With an initial emphasis on wood waste, the program also promotes landfill gas as a potential source of energy for industrial processes and other uses. Several landfill waste disposal facilities across Alabama have been identified as prime candidates for landfill gas recovery and utilization.
Biomass Energy Tax Credit (Corporate) (South Carolina) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory In 2007 South Carolina enacted the Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act (S.B. 243), which amended previous legislation concerning a landfill methane tax credit. The original legislation, enacted in 2006, allows a 25% corporate tax credit for costs incurred by a taxpayer for the use of landfill methane gas to provide power for a manufacturing facility. The 2007 amendments allow taxpayers a credit against the income tax and/or license fees for 25% of the purchasing and installation cost of equipment used to create heat, power, steam, electricity, or another form of energy. Fuels used by the equipment must be for commercial use and consist of at least 90% biomass resources.


In 2011, the South Carolina Department of Revenue issued a private ruling that the tax credit could be applied to an individual's income taxes. Specifically, a limited liability company (LLC) utilizing the biomass tax credit is allowed to pass through the credit to the shareholders of an S Corporation owning 60% of the parent LLC, provided there are at least four shareholders and all are residents of South Carolina. Costs incurred by a taxpayer must be certified by the State Energy Office, in consultation with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture and the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, in order to qualify for the credit.

The tax credit for all expenditures is limited to $650,000 per taxpayer year and may not exceed 50% of a taxpayer's liability for that year. Unused credits may be carried forward for 15 years. For a fiscal year, all claims may not exceed $650,000 and must apply proportionately to all eligible claimants. To obtain the maximum amount of credit available, the taxpayer must submit a request for credit to the State Energy Office by January 31st for all qualifying equipment placed in service in the previous calendar year. The State Energy Office must notify the taxpayer that it qualifies for the credit and the amount of credit allocated to the taxpayer by March 1st of that year.

For purposes of this credit, a biomass resource means non-commercial wood, by-products of wood processing, demolition debris containing wood, agricultural waste, animal waste, sewage, landfill gas, and other organic materials, not including fossil fuels. "Commercial use" means a use intended for the purpose of generating a profit. A "manufacturing facility" means an establishment where tangible personal property is produced or assembled.
Biomass Energy Tax Credit (Personal) (South Carolina) Personal Tax Credit State/Territory In 2007 South Carolina enacted the Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act (S.B. 243), which amended previous legislation concerning a landfill methane tax credit. The original legislation, enacted in 2006, allows a 25% corporate tax credit for costs incurred by a taxpayer for the use of landfill methane gas to provide power for a manufacturing facility. The 2007 amendments provide that, for taxable years beginning after 2007, taxpayers are allowed a credit against the income tax and/or license fees for 25% of the costs incurred by the taxpayer for the purchase and installation of equipment used to create heat, power, steam, electricity or another form of energy for commercial use from a fuel consisting of at least 90% biomass resources.

In 2011, the South Carolina Department of Revenue [1] issued a private ruling that the tax credit could be applied to an individual's income taxes. Specifically, a limited liability company (LLC) utilizing the biomass tax credit is allowed to pass through the credit to the shareholders of an S Corporation owning 60% of the parent LLC, provided there are at least four shareholders and all are residents of South Carolina. Costs incurred by a taxpayer must be certified by the State Energy Office, in consultation with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture and the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, in order to qualify for the credit.

For taxable years beginning after 2007, the tax credit for all expenditures is limited to $650,000 per taxpayer year, and may not exceed 50% of a taxpayer's liability for that year. Unused credits may be carried forward for 15 years. For a fiscal year, all claims may not exceed $650,000 and must apply proportionately to all eligible claimants. To obtain the maximum amount of credit available, the taxpayer must submit a request for credit to the State Energy Office by January 31st for all qualifying equipment placed in service in the previous calendar year. The State Energy Office must notify the taxpayer that it qualifies for the credit and the amount of credit allocated to the taxpayer by March 1st of that year.

For purposes of this credit, a biomass resource means non-commercial wood, by-products of wood processing, demolition debris containing wood, agricultural waste, animal waste, sewage, landfill gas, and other organic materials, not including fossil fuels. "Commercial use" means a use intended for the purpose of generating a profit. A "manufacturing facility" means an establishment where tangible personal property is produced or assembled.
Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction (New Mexico) Sales Tax Incentive State/Territory In 2005, New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels, or biobased products in determining the amount of Compensating Tax due.

New Mexico's Compensating Tax is an excise, or "use" tax, which is typically levied on the purchaser of the product or service for using tangible property in the state. The tax applies to imports of factory and office equipment, and other items. The rate is 5.125% on certain property used in New Mexico and 5% on certain services used in New Mexico. Compensating Tax is designed to protect New Mexico businesses from unfair competition from out-of-state business not subject to a sales or gross receipts tax. This biomass Compensating Tax deduction is analogous to a sales tax exemption for renewable energy equipment available in some other states.

Deductions from compensating tax do not have to be reported to the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department but records substantiating the deduction should be kept in the taxpayer's records.
Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive State/Territory Michigan exempts certain energy production related farm facilities from real and personal property taxes. Among exempted property are certain methane digesters, biomass gasification equipment, thermal depolymerization systems, and equipment used to harvest crop residues or dedicated crops used for energy production.

In order to be eligible for the exemption, methane digester equipment must be certified by the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) and the farm must be verified as compliant under theMichigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP). In addition, the facility owner must allow "access for not more than 2 universities to collect information regarding the effectiveness of the methane digester and the methane digester electric generating system in generating electricity and processing animal waste and production area waste". The exemption includes equipment used to generate electricity from methane digester systems and equipment used to generate heat or electricity from biomass gasifiers.
Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Environmental Regulations State/Province PEI Biomass Guidelines identify two major pathways that biomass projects may follow: No Public Investment, and Public Investment. Projects with Public Investment include any project that has:

• Grants or loans for start-up, capital, or operating costs;

• Silvicultural or other land management incentives provided through Departmental programs (e.g. Forest Enhancement Program, ALUS); or

• Green credits or certification from Government.

Guidelines for No Public Investment projects must only comply with existing legislation such as the Environmental Protection Act, Wildlife Conservation Act, and other applicable laws.

For Public Investment projects, the following guidelines must also be met:

• All harvest sites require a pre-harvest management plan meeting the standards set out in the Forests, Fish and Wildlife Division’s Ecosystem-based Forest Management Manual;

• All harvests must be in compliance with the standards set out in the Forests, Fish and Wildlife Division’s Ecosystem-based Forest Management Manual;

• For clearcut harvests, only the tree bole may be removed, with branches and foliage to be spread throughout the harvest site (i.e. no whole tree removal);

• For commercial thinnings and other non-clearcut harvests, whole tree harvest is allowed, but stumps must be left in situ; and

• All biomass harvest sites must be mapped via GPS and the map files submitted to the Forests, Fish and Wildlife Division.

Clearcut harvests on sites being converted to agriculture or other non-forest uses are exempt from the management plan requirement and other standards of the Ecosystem-based Forest Management Manual.
Biomass Sales and Use Tax Exemption (Georgia) Sales Tax Incentive State/Territory Georgia enacted legislation in April 2006 (HB 1018) creating an exemption for biomass materials from the state's sales and use taxes. The term "biomass material" is defined as "organic matter, excluding fossil fuels, including agricultural crops, plants, trees, wood, wood wastes and residues, sawmill waste, sawdust, wood chips, bark chips, and forest thinning, harvesting, or clearing residues; wood waste from pallets or other wood demolition debris; peanut shells; pecan shells; cotton plants; corn stalks; and plant matter, including aquatic plants, grasses, stalks, vegetation, and residues, including hulls, shells, or cellulose-containing fibers." To qualify for the exemption, the biomass material must be utilized in the production of energy, including the production of electricity, steam, or both electricity and steam. Pellets and fuels derived from biomass are generally eligible.
Bond Financing (New Jersey) Bond Program State/Province Bond financing is available to eligible businesses through the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, in the amount of $500,000 to $10 million. The bonds can be used to finance capital improvements and expansions, equipment and machinery, construction, and renovations. Taxable bonds can be used for debt refinancing.
Bond Financing Program (New Hampshire) Bond Program State/Province BFA’s Bond Financing Program offers tax-exempt and taxable bonds for fixed-asset expansion projects. Industrial development revenue bonds can be used by manufacturers for the acquisition, renovation, and construction of new buildings, and for the purchase of land or new equipment.
Bond and Loan Program (Arkansas) Bond Program
Loan Program
State/Province The Bond and Loan programs of Arkansas are four programs designed to attract small business development within the state.

The Minority Business Loan Mobilization Revolving Fund is restricted to sustaining the business, economic growth and development of the minority businesses in the state of Arkansas. The proceeds may be used for job creation, expansion, repairs, acquisition of machinery and equipment, inventory purchase, and working capital. To be eligible for the program the Business Owner must be a member of the following minority groups: African American, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic American, Pacific Islander American, Service Disabled Veteran.

The Capital Access Program makes funds available to borrowers who might otherwise have difficulty in obtaining conventional bank loans. The LLR fund is available on a pooled basis to be applied to any of the lenders Capital Access Program loans.

The Capital Access Program states that a portion of the SSBCI (State Small Business Credit Initiative) allocation has been set aside to provide direct co-investments in Arkansas companies that have received commitments for an institutional venture capital investment from qualified venture capital entities. The source of money for these AIF investments has been borrowed capital from banks. With the advent of the SSBCI funding, ADFA now has an ability to support Arkansas businesses directly with venture capital investments without having to borrow the money.

The Bond Guaranty Program is open to businesses that qualify for taxable and/or tax-exempt financing but do not have the financial strength to access national capital markets. The Arkansas Development Finance Authority acts as a guarantor of the bond issue and this guarantee provides the necessary credit enhancement for the bondholder and takes the place of a Line of Credit or Bond Insurance.
Bonding Assistance Program (Louisiana) Bond Program State/Province The Bonding Assistance Program provides assistance with new bond guarantees to small businesses. The bond underwriting is accomplished by a surety company, and the surety company has final bonding approval authority. Once the surety has given final bonding approval, the Bonding Assistance Program provides collateral up to 25% of the base contract amount, up to $200,000, on a project specific basis.
Boundary Waters Canoe Area (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Boundary Waters Canoe Area occupies a large section of northern Minnesota, and is preserved as a primitive wilderness area. Construction and new development is prohibited. A map of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area can be found here: http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5130164.pdf
Brainerd Public Utilities - Renewable Incentives Program (Minnesota) Utility Rebate Program Utility Brainerd Public Utilities offers a rebate program for customers that install solar photovoltaic systems. Rebates are $2 per watt, up to $4,000. Systems are limited to 40 kW, in compliance with Minnesota's net metering policy. For more information, contact Scott Sjolund below.
Broward County Online Solar Permitting (Florida) Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Local Broward County now offers Go SOLAR Online Permitting*, for rooftop solar photovoltaic system permitting. This online permitting system may be used for residential or low commercial properties that are governed by a participating municipality.

The online permitting system is designed to provide a one-stop solar permitting process with a single application form, electronic review and approval, and flat fee. Applicants can use this system to choose from pre-approved and pre-engineered solar panel mounting installation designs, and then apply for permits using those designs. Applicants must apply in person to request permits for installations that are NOT typical to one of the listed and pre-approved installation designs.

*The Go SOLAR Online Permitting System was made possible by the Go SOLAR Broward Rooftop Solar Challenge. The Rooftop Solar Challenge supports the goals of the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program and the SunShot Initiative, which seek to make solar electricity cost competitive without subsidies by the end of the decade.
Brownfields Assistance Matching Grants (Delaware) Grant Program State/Province The Brownfield Assistance Program, administrated by the Delaware Economic Development Office (DEDO) and funded from Delaware Strategic Fund, provides matching grants to owners and developers to encourage the redevelopment of environmentally distressed sites within the state. Brownfield redevelopment is an important tool for Delaware's livable growth, recycling the state's land and cleaning up the environment within areas designed for growth. However, these sites cannot be revitalized without the help of developers, commercial real estate firms, lenders, and property owners. In the past, concerns over liability and the added cost of cleaning up a site have hindered the redevelopment of Brownfields. The state of Delaware understands the risks are higher for these projects and, in response, provides financial incentives and a fast track cleanup process.

The program is administered in collaboration with the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and offers the lesser of up to $100,000 or 50 percent of the costs associated with the investigation and remediation of a Brownfield site. Phase I costs are excluded from the Program and unlike the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC)’s Program, each project must have an employment impact of a minimum of five permanent full-time jobs. To be eligible for DEDO’s Program, the owner, prospective owner or developer must first obtain a Brownfield Certification through DNREC that recognizes the site as a Brownfield. After Certification has been obtained, an application can be sent to DEDO for evaluation and processing. Eligibility for Brownfield assistance will be based on the project’s potential to serve a public purpose by maintaining or expanding employment in the State, by maintaining, expanding, or diversifying business and industry in the State, and/or maintaining or increasing its tax base.

Associated with the program is the Delaware Brownfields Marketplace, a list of Brownfield sites available for redevelopment in Delaware.
Brownfield Development Tax Abatements (Alabama) Corporate Tax Incentive
Property Tax Incentive
Sales Tax Incentive
Local The Brownfield Development Tax Abatements gives cities and counties the ability to abate, non-educational city and county sales and use taxes, non-educational state, city and county property taxes – up to 20 years, and mortgage and recording taxes. The brownfield development property must equal the lesser of 30 percent of the original cost of the property as remediated or $2,000,000 for companies expanding facilities. For new businesses, there is no such requirement. The property must be in the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's voluntary cleanup program to qualify for Brownfield abatements.
Brownfield Grants (Wisconsin) Grant Program State/Province WEDC provides Brownfield Grants to local governments and businesses for redeveloping Brownfield sites. The maximum grant award is $1.25 million and a 20-50% match is required, depending on the grant awarded.
Brownfield Redevelopment Program (Missouri) Personal Tax Incentives State/Province Brownfield Redevelopment Program provides financial incentives for the redevelopment of commercial/industrial sites that are contaminated with hazardous substances and have been abandoned or underutilized for at least three years. The Department of Economic Development(DED)may issue tax credits for up to 100% of the cost of remediating the project property. DED will issue 75% of the credits upon adequate proof of payment of the costs; the remaining 25% will not be issued until a clean letter has been issued by DNR. The tax credit may also include up to one hundred percent of the costs of demolition that are not directly part of the remediation activities. State tax credits may also be issued for non-remediation demolition costs. The total state costs for providing tax credits must be less than the projected economic impact, as determined by the DED.
Brownfield/Grayfield Tax Credit Program (Iowa) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Brownfield/Grayfield Tax Credit Program offers qualifying projects tax credits of 24% for qualifying costs of a Brownfield project and 30% if the project meets green building requirements. Grayfield is also included in the tax credit program. A Grayfield project can receive tax credits of 12% of qualifying costs and 15% if the project meets green building requirements. Tax credits are available on a first come first served basis, with a maximum tax credit per project of $1,000,000 and a $10,000,000 maximum.
Brownfields Revitalization and Economic Development Program (South Dakota) Enterprise Zone State/Province The South Dakota Brownfields Program aims to encourage cleanup and business development of contaminated sites. Currently, entities can apply for cleanup funds through the Ground Water Quality Program to assist with the redevelopment of brownfields. The 2004 session of the South Dakota State Legislature passed HB 1175 authorizing the establishment of a brownfields revitalization and economic development program including two funds - the brownfields cleanup revolving loan fund and the brownfields assessment and cleanup fund. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources has been directed to develop rules for the administration of these funds which will be funded through grants from the Environmental Protection Agency's Brownfields Program.
Business Development Loan Program (North Dakota) Loan Program State/Province The Business Development Loan Program assists new and existing businesses in obtaining loans that would have a higher degree of risk than would normally be acceptable to a lending institution. Business may use the loan for a variety of purposes, including establishing or purchasing a business, financing the acquisition of real property, expanding a business, or for working capital.
Business Employment Incentive Program (BEIP) (New Jersey) Grant Program State/Province Economically viable expanding or relocating businesses that create jobs in New Jersey are eligible to secure annual incentive grants via the Business Employment Incentive Program (BEIP) of up to 80% of the total amount of employees' state income taxes withheld by the company during the calendar year from the new employees hired, awarded for up to 10 years, to a maximum of $50,000 per employee over the course of the grant. Approved businesses receive annual cash grants based on the number of new jobs they have created in the State of New Jersey.
Business Energy Efficiency Rebates (Offered by 5 Utilities) (North Dakota) Utility Rebate Program Utility Bright Energy Solutions offers energy efficiency cash incentive programs to residential and business customers of municipal utilities that are members of Missouri River Energy Services. In North Dakota, this includes:

Cavalier Municipal Utilities Hillsboro Municipal Utilities Lakota Municipal Light Plant Northwood Municipal Utilities Valley City Public Works

For commercial customers, rebates are available for compressed air system efficiency, heating and cooling, lighting, and VFDs and pumps. Applications are available on the program web site.
Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit Federal The federal business energy investment tax credit available under 26 USC § 48 was expanded significantly by the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (H.R. 1424), enacted in October 2008. This law extended the duration -- by eight years -- of the existing credits for solar energy, fuel cells and microturbines; increased the credit amount for fuel cells; established new credits for small wind-energy systems, geothermal heat pumps, and combined heat and power (CHP) systems; allowed utilities to use the credits; and allowed taxpayers to take the credit against the alternative minimum tax (AMT), subject to certain limitations. The credit was further expanded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, enacted in February 2009.



In general, the following credits are available for eligible systems placed in service on or before December 31, 2016*:


  • Solar. The credit is equal to 30% of expenditures, with no maximum credit. Eligible solar energy property includes equipment that uses solar energy to generate electricity, to heat or cool (or provide hot water for use in) a structure, or to provide solar process heat. Hybrid solar lighting systems, which use solar energy to illuminate the inside of a structure using fiber-optic distributed sunlight, are eligible. Passive solar systems and solar pool-heating systems are not eligible.
  • Fuel Cells. The credit is equal to 30% of expenditures, with no maximum credit. However, the credit for fuel cells is capped at $1,500 per 0.5 kilowatt (kW) of capacity. Eligible property includes fuel cells with a minimum capacity of 0.5 kW that have an electricity-only generation efficiency of 30% or higher. (Note that the credit for property placed in service before October 4, 2008, is capped at $500 per 0.5 kW.)
  • Small Wind Turbines. The credit is equal to 30% of expenditures, with no maximum credit for small wind turbines placed in service after December 31, 2008. Eligible small wind property includes wind turbines up to 100 kW in capacity. (In general, the maximum credit is $4,000 for eligible property placed in service after October 3, 2008, and before January 1, 2009. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 removed the $4,000 maximum credit limit for small wind turbines.)
  • Geothermal Systems. The credit is equal to 10% of expenditures, with no maximum credit limit stated. Eligible geothermal energy property includes geothermal heat pumps and equipment used to produce, distribute or use energy derived from a geothermal deposit. For electricity produced by geothermal power, equipment qualifies only up to, but not including, the electric transmission stage. For geothermal heat pumps, this credit applies to eligible property placed in service after October 3, 2008. Note that the credit for geothermal property, with the exception of geothermal heat pumps, has no stated expiration date.
  • Microturbines. The credit is equal to 10% of expenditures, with no maximum credit limit stated (explicitly). The credit for microturbines is capped at $200 per kW of capacity. Eligible property includes microturbines up to two megawatts (MW) in capacity that have an electricity-only generation efficiency of 26% or higher.
  • Combined Heat and Power (CHP). The credit is equal to 10% of expenditures, with no maximum limit stated. Eligible CHP property generally includes systems up to 50 MW in capacity that exceed 60% energy efficiency, subject to certain limitations and reductions for large systems. The efficiency requirement does not apply to CHP systems that use biomass for at least 90% of the system's energy source, but the credit may be reduced for less-efficient systems. This credit applies to eligible property placed in service after October 3, 2008.

In general, the original use of the equipment must begin with the taxpayer, or the system must be constructed by the taxpayer. The equipment must also meet any performance and quality standards in effect at the time the equipment is acquired. The energy property must be operational in the year in which the credit is first taken.

Significantly, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 repealed a previous restriction on the use of the credit for eligible projects also supported by "subsidized energy financing." For projects placed in service after December 31, 2008, this limitation no longer applies. Businesses that receive other incentives are advised to consult with a tax professional regarding how to calculate this federal tax credit.


* A number of changes to this credit are scheduled to take effect for systems placed in service after December 31, 2016. The credit for equipment that uses solar energy to generate electricity, to heat or cool (or provide hot water for use in) a structure, or to provide solar process heat will decrease from 30% to 10%. The credit for geothermal heat pumps, hybrid solar lighting, small wind, fuel cells, microturbines, and combined heat and power systems will expire. The credit amount for equipment which uses geothermal energy to produce electricity will remain at 10%.
Business Incentive Loans and Bonds (Georgia) Bond Program
Loan Program
Non-Profit The Strategic Industries Loan Fund (SILF) is a program offered by the OneGeorgia Authority. The purpose of SILF is to provide financing, through loan assistance, for the purchasing of fixed assets for companies that are considered as a relocation or expansion site for an emerging or development-stage company in a strategic industry targeted by Georgia. SILF is only to be used when needed to fill a financing gap that is unmet by the private sector. The State of Georgia has identified energy as a strategic target industry because it produces commercially viable technologies and will create higher quality jobs.
Business Opportunity Loan Fund (Wisconsin) Loan Program State/Province WEDC may provide financing options through loans or loan guaranties to businesses that are investing funds to expand or relocate to Wisconsin. WEDC investments generally range between $200,000 and $1 million based on need, quality and quantity of jobs and other program, statute, and policy requirements. Recipients may also be eligible for loan guaranties in addition to or in lieu of loan financing.
Business Retention and Relocation Assistance Grant (BRRAG) (New Jersey) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province A business relocating operations within New Jersey and retaining jobs, or a business maintaining jobs at a current location and making a qualified capital investment is eligible for corporate business tax credits through the Business Retention and Relocation Assistance Grant (BRRAG) program. Eligible businesses can receive credits up to $2,250 per year for up to six years, per job retained in the State.
Business and Market Development Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Grant Program State/Province This policy is no longer active. In 2013 the Business and Market Development Program will be absorbed into the new Business Development Fund.

The Business and Market Development Program provides new entrepreneurs and expanding small businesses with funding to help them acquire the necessary expertise to pursue new business ideas and new markets for their products or services. The program supports new growth opportunities in the economy, such as value-added manufacturing activities and export-oriented opportunities.

The program will provide assistance of up to $25,000 in the form of a non-repayable contribution. These funds must be matched on an equal basis by the applicant.

Small businesses (those with less than 50 employees and less than $5 million in annual sales) located and operating in Newfoundland and Labrador, including corporations, cooperatives and other similar structures, are eligible to apply. The applicant must demonstrate that it has the appropriate financial structure and management ability to carry out the project.

Applications will be considered for the following projects: • Developing new markets or researching new product development opportunities. • Technical feasibility research relating to potential new business opportunities.

• Acquiring external expertise on production processes, marketing, financial management or other internal company needs for growth and expansion.
Businesses that Create New Jobs Tax Credit (Maryland) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province Businesses located in Maryland that create new positions and establish or expand business facilities in the state may be entitled to a Businesses that Create New Jobs Tax Credit. To be eligible, businesses must first have been granted a property tax credit by a local government for creating the new jobs. The credit may be taken against corporate income tax, personal income tax or insurance premium tax. The business must create at least 25 new positions as part of the new or expanded business facility, 5,000 square feet or more, in Maryland.
CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and Nabors Well Services. Pre- and post-test data are being analyzed to assess the results of the experiment. Additionally, a request for proposals was issued for drilling and testing a deep well on property owned by Hanson Aggregates, Carter County, east Kentucky. Contracts are being finalized with site construction and drilling expected to begin in January, 2013. As proposed, the well will be drilled to a total depth of 4,800 feet to test the Cambrian Knox Group dolomite and Mt. Simon sandstone and identify the primary seals to ensure stored CO2 will remain in deep reservoirs (no CO2 will be used in this test well). Reservoir data will also be acquired for other potential storage zones and sealing units. The Division of Carbon Management’s goal is to investigate, develop, and promote technical solutions for carbon capture, storage and reuse; and to engage with state, regional and federal agencies in the development of state policy designed to man¬age greenhouse gas emissions, especially carbon dioxide, in a carbon constrained environment. The division has oversight in implementing Strategy 6 of the Governor’s energy plan.
CPS Energy - Solar PV Rebate Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility CPS Energy, San Antonio's municipal utility, offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes, schools, or businesses. There are four rebate "tiers" available depending on customer type and whether or not the customer is using a "local" registered CPS Energy Installer.* Third-party owned systems (e.g., leased PV systems) are not eligible for rebates (a customer must make the upfront financial investment). In all tiers, final rebate levels will be determined upon a final inspection from the utility. Unfavorable shading, angles or direction may influence the final rebate amount. The rebate is available to all CPS Energy customers for systems of at least 1 kilowatt (kW)-AC. CPS Energy will offer special considerations for systems larger than 100 kW, but such systems remain eligible for rebates. The following "tiers" are in place:


  • Tier One
    Eligibility: Schools (private or public; must be accredited and nonprofit) who use local, registered CPS Energy Installers
    Amount: $2.00 per watt-AC for the first 25 kilowatts (kW) and $1.30 per watt for any additional capacity, with a maximum rebate of $80,000.
  • Tier Two
    Eligibility: Residential customers who use local certified CPS Energy Installers
    Amount: $1.60 per watt-AC up to $25,000 maximum or 50% of rebated equipment installation labor and material costs, whichever value is less.
  • Tier Three
    Eligibility: Commercial customers who use local certified CPS Energy Installers
    Amount: $1.60 per watt-AC for the first 25 kW-AC and $1.30 per watt-AC for any additional capacity up to $80,000 maximum or 50% of rebated equipment installation labor and material costs, whichever value is less.
  • Tier Four
    Eligibility: Residential and commercial customers who do not use local, registered CPS Energy Installers
    Amount: $1.30 per watt-AC up to $25,000 maximum for residential and $80,000 for commercial

On an individual basis, rebate eligibility will be determined by a pre-inspection of the site. In order to ensure that rebated systems are efficient, safe, and productive, numerous equipment and installation requirements apply. System owners are responsible for obtaining all applicable permits and permissions required to install and operate the system and all work must be performed in accordance with all applicable federal, state, local, and manufacturer codes and standards. CPS publishes interconnection guidelines for systems smaller than 25 kW. Rules for larger systems will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Rebate recipients will be required to sign an agreement handing over all of the renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by the system to CPS Energy.


*CPS defines "local" as being located in CPS Energy territory with a CPS Energy electric account.
CT Clean Energy Communities (Connecticut) Green Power Purchasing Local The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their support for energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy.

In order to participate in the program, a municipality must meet three requirements:

1. The municipality must make the Municipal Energy Efficiency Pledge and reduce municipal building energy consumption 20% from baseline levels by 2018.

2. Commit to the Municipal Clean, Renewable Energy Pledge and purchase 20% of municipal buildings’ energy use by 2018 from renewable sources;

3. Achieve milestones in support of energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy. Communities receive energy efficiency points or renewable energy points depending on the milestones achieved.

Once communities earn 100 energy efficiency points, they are eligible for a Bright Idea Grant ranging from $5,000 to $15,000. Once they earn 100 renewable energy points, they are eligible for a clean energy system equivalent to 1 kilowatt (kW) of solar PV.

* Additional criteria apply. See the program web site for details.
CT Solar Loan (Connecticut) State Loan Program State/Territory NOTE: Solar Loan program is being updated and not currently offered.


The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials.
Calvert County - Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local Zoning regulations for wind power systems
Camden County - Wind Energy Systems Ordinance (North Carolina) Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Local In September 2007, Camden County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained.

For the purposes of this ordinance, wind-energy systems are classified as “large” if they consist of one or more turbines with a rated generating capacity of more than 20 kilowatts (kW) and “small” if a project consists of a single turbine rated at less than 20 kW. A site permit is required to establish, operate, and maintain any wind-energy system rated over 20 kW.

Height Requirements: The total height of a wind turbine is determined by the height above grade to the tip of the turbine blade as it reaches its highest point of rotation. The height limit for small wind turbines is 150 feet. Large systems may be taller if recommended as necessary by the Planning Board and subsequently approved by the Board of Commissioners.

Visual Appearance: Towers and rotor blades must maintain a galvanized finish or be painted so as to conform to their surroundings and reduce visual obtrusiveness. Wind-energy systems must also remain free from signage (except that of the manufacturer), advertising, flags, streamers, and other decorative items.

Setbacks: The ordinance requires that the base of the wind turbine must not be closer to surrounding property lines than its height unless a professional engineer (registered in North Carolina) certifies that the fall zone of the turbine will be within the proposed setback area. Small wind-energy systems must be set back from inhabited structures on adjacent property at least 1.5 times the height of the turbine unless the applicant can secure a permanent easement from the adjoining property owner(s) providing for a fall zone. Large wind-energy systems must be set back from inhabited structures on adjacent property at least two times the height of the turbine.

Building Permit Requirements: A building permit shall be required and building permit applications for small wind energy systems shall be accompanied by standard drawings of the wind turbine structure, including the tower, base, and footings. An engineering analysis of the tower, certified by a licensed professional engineer. This includes standards for ice/wind loading. This analysis may be supplied by the manufacturer. Wet stamps shall not be required.

Impact Analysis, Mitigation, and Planning: Applications for site permits for large wind-energy projects must include the following: building and electrical permits; site and design information; construction, operation, maintenance and insurance information; decommissioning and site restoration information; a comprehensive impact analysis and all other relevant permits and approvals. All applicants must also undergo a public hearing so that the county planning board may receive comments and other information pertinent to the application.
Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Environmental Regulations
Equipment Certification
Fees
Generating Facility Rate-Making
Generation Disclosure
Industry Recruitment/Support
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
Federal The purpose of this Act is to promote safety, the protection of the environment, the conservation of oil and gas resources, joint production arrangements, and economically efficient infrastructures.

The act sets up a regulatory structure for licensing, permitting, equipment certification, safety and operational regulations and standards, land owner rights and the rights of access for exploratory and extraction operations, as well as prohibited areas.

The act also addresses the fee structures, the development plan approval process, employee benefits and training standards, financial obligations, pipeline and transmission tariffs, purchasing agreements and sales, and legal recourse.
Canada Small Business Financing Program (Canada) Loan Program Federal Since 1961, the Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) seeks to increase the availability of loans for establishing, expanding, modernizing and improving small businesses. It does this by encouraging financial institutions to make their financing available to small businesses. By sharing the risk with a financial institution, the program may help businesses secure up to $500,000.

Small businesses or start-ups operating for profit in Canada, with gross annual revenues of $5 million or less.

Not eligible under this program are farming businesses (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has a similar program for the farming industry — for information, visit www.agr.gc.ca), not-for-profit organizations, or charitable and religious organizations.

Up to a maximum of $500,000 for any one borrower is available, of which no more than $350,000 can be used for purchasing leasehold improvements or improving leased property and purchasing or improving new or used equipment.

Financial institutions deliver the program. The decision to grant a loan rests entirely with the financial institution.

Loans can be used for financing up to 90% of the cost of:

- purchasing or improving land, real property or immovables - purchasing new or existing leasehold improvements - purchasing or improving new or used equipment

The interest rate is determined by individual financial institutions. The interest rate may be variable or fixed:

Variable rate: The maximum chargeable is the lender's prime lending rate plus 3%.

Fixed rate: The maximum chargeable is the lender's single family residential mortgage rate plus 3%.

A registration fee of 2% of the total amount loaned under the program must also be paid by the borrower to the lender. It can be financed as part of the loan.

The registration fee and a portion of the interest are submitted to Industry Canada by the lender to help offset the costs of the program for the government.

Lenders are required to take security in the assets financed. Lenders also have the option to take an additional unsecured personal guarantee, which cannot exceed 25% of the total amount loaned.
Canada-Saskatchewan Western Economic Partnership Agreement (Saskatchewan, Canada) Grant Program State/Province All funds have been committed for the current Canada-Saskatchewan Western Economic Partnership Agreement and no new applications are being accepted.

The Canada-Saskatchewan Western Economic Partnership Agreement (WEPA) is a four-year, $50-million federal/provincial agreement designed to encourage economic development and growth in the Saskatchewan economy. Signed in January 2009, this agreement is administered through Western Economic Diversification Canada and Enterprise Saskatchewan. This agreement replaces the former five-year, $50-million WEPA that expired in 2008. Through joint federal and provincial support, WEPA provides funding for projects that build and sustain economic growth and opportunity in Saskatchewan through the following strategic theme areas:

Business Productivity and Competitiveness: Includes investments to increase small- and medium-sized business productivity; increase export readiness; assist in business growth and viability; and strengthen national and international competitiveness of Saskatchewan business.

Technology Commercialization: Includes investments to increase collaboration with local research institutions to successfully develop, commercialize, market and distribute technologies, products and services; or enhance industry or community capacity to invest in technologies, products and services to improve industry or community adoption and commercialization of new technologies, products or services.

Community and Regional Development and Diversification: Increase the capacity of Saskatchewan communities to implement strategies that promote sustainable development; create greater collaboration and integration between and among government and communities; increase investment and business opportunities; or increase the economic infrastructure for the further development of leading industries, including internationally significant tourism initiatives.

Trade and Investment: Increase national and international awareness of Saskatchewan products and services.

Eligible applicants must be:

Legal entities and include non-profit organizations; post-secondary institutions, hospitals or regional health care centres engaged in research; or other provincial agencies or legal entities created by the provincial government.

Any organization, agency, university or group that requires funding for a project, which would have a measurable impact on the economic development of the province.

Individual commercial businesses or commercial activities will not be eligible for support.
Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999 (Canada) Environmental Regulations Federal The Canadian Environmental Protection Act of 1999 (CEPA 1999) provides the legislative framework for Environment Canada, and outlines the provisions for the prevention and management of risks posed by toxic and other harmful substances.

The CEPA 1999 implements pollution prevention, procedures for the investigation and assessment of substances, and requirements with respect to substances that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have determined to be toxic or capable of becoming toxic, and provisions regarding animate products of biotechnology. The enactment also contains provisions respecting fuels, international air and water pollution, motor emissions, nutrients whose release into water can cause excessive growth of aquatic vegetation and environmental emergencies, provisions to regulate the environmental effects of government operations and to protect the environment on and in relation to federal land and aboriginal land, disposal of wastes and other matter at sea, and the export and import of wastes.

The enactment provides for the gathering of information for research and the creation of inventories of data, which are designed for publication, and for the development and publishing of objectives, guidelines and codes of practice.
Canadian River Compact (Multiple States) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently ratified by the respective state legislatures, approved by Congress, and was signed into law by the President in 1952. The interstate Canadian River Commission includes one state commissioner appointed by the governor of each member state and one federal commissioner appointed by the President. The major purposes of the Compact are to promote interstate comity; to remove causes of present and future controversy; to make secure and protect present developments within the States; and to provide for the construction of additional works for the conservation of the waters of Canadian River.
Capacity and Energy Payments to Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Green Power Purchasing
Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals
State/Province Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) that was enacted to promote conservation and to encourage use of alternative sources of power generation. PURPA established a class of non-utility generators comprised of small power producers and cogenerators, referred to as Qualifying Facilities (QFs). Docket No. 4822, and subsequently Docket No. 19279, approved methodologies for full-avoided cost payments made by Georgia Power Company (GPC) to QFs pursuant to PURPA. Avoided costs are the “incremental costs to an electric utility of electric energy or capacity or both which, but for the purchase from the qualifying facility or qualifying facilities, such utility would generate itself or purchase from another source”. Standard firm (average capacity factor of at least 90%) and non-firm (energy only) contracts were established for QFs up to 80 MWs. Capacity payments are determined by the needs stated in the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP). RFPs are conducted to address the capacity needs. Commission Rule 515-3-4-.04(3)(f) exempts QFs up to 30 MWs from having to bid into RFPs. Instead, QFs must notice in to receive a proxy-price set by the last winning bidder of the RFP. QFs must operate at 96% availability to receive the proxy-price. QFs shall bear the cost of interconnections and any resulting changes to the transmission system.
Capital Access Program (CAP) (Michigan) Loan Program State/Province The Capital Access Program (CAP), utilizes public resources to generate private financing for small business in Michigan seeking access to capital. Funding from the Michigan Strategic Fund is joined with private banking participants to enable more favorable loan access for small businesses. To date, the private/public ratio of funding has been approximately 28 to 1. Eligible businesses must have no more than 500 workers and the maximum loan amount which may be enrolled in CAP is $5 million.
Capital Access Program (Vermont) Loan Program State/Province The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund a reserve account which insures loans enrolled in the program. Borrowers with gross annual sales of $5 million or less are eligible for the program.
Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Grant Program
Rebate Program
State/Province The Capital Investment Incentive (CII) is part of the Productivity Investment Program as outlined in the economic growth plan for Nova Scotia, jobsHere.

This incentive can contribute up to 20% toward the cost of technologically-advanced machinery, clean technology, equipment, software and hardware with preference given to exporters in qualified industries.

The CII is limited to corporations in the following industries: - Advanced manufacturing and processing - Development of non-traditional sources of energy - Life-sciences - Aerospace and defense - Information and communication technology (ICT) - Ocean technology - Professional, Scientific and Technical Services excluding the following: Legal Services; Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping and Payroll Services; Advertising and Related Services; Photographic Services; Veterinary Services; Translation and Interpretation Services

Under certain circumstances, strategic gateway and trade related activities may be eligible under the Capital Investment Incentive.

The CII helps companies make investments in their future by offsetting the cost of incremental capital purchases. These are the kinds of purchases that would result in cost savings and productivity improvements, and increase competitiveness in international markets.

If deemed eligible under the guidelines of the incentive, companies can receive reimbursement of 20% of the cost of its equipment, up to a maximum of $1 million. Acquisitions less than $25,000 will not be considered.

Please note the following changes to the Capital Investment Incentive Guidelines are retroactive April 1, 2011. An application must be submitted to the Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism (ERDT), prior to any commitment to purchase the Qualified Property.
Capital Investment Tax Credit (Florida) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Capital Investment Tax Credit is an annual credit, provided for up to twenty years, against the corporate income tax. Eligible projects are those in designated high-impact portions of the following sectors: clean energy, biomedical technology, financial services, information technology, silicon technology, transportation equipment manufacturing, or be a corporate headquarters facility. Projects must also create a minimum of 100 jobs and invest at least $25 million in eligible capital costs. Eligible capital costs include all expenses incurred in the acquisition, construction, installation, and equipping of a project from the beginning of construction to the commencement of operations. The level of investment and the project's Florida corporate income tax liability for the 20 years following commencement of operations determines the amount of the annual credit.
Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth’s utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), and the Department for Energy Development and Independence (DEDI), continues by the division. The program is broken into 9 project areas with 6 projects devoted to fundamental research, 2 projects devoted to pilot scale research and one project for a semi-commercial slip stream CO2 capture system. The 9 projects are geared towards addressing the most pertinent issues facing the wide scale deployment of CO2 capture systems for post-combustion applications. In 2011, CAER was awarded a U.S. DOE cooperative agreement which will allow CMRG to pursue the project for a semi-commercial slip stream CO2 capture system, with substantial federal funding and involvement.
Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction allows a taxpayer a deduction to adjusted gross income with respect to the amortization of the amortizable costs of carbon dioxide capture, sequestration or utilization machinery and equipment based upon a period of 10 years. Such amortization deduction shall be an amount equal to 55% of the amortizable costs of such machinery and equipment for the first taxable year in which such machinery and equipment are in operation and 5% of the amortizable costs of such machinery and equipment for each of the next nine taxable years.
Carbon Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) Environmental Regulations
Fees
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The purpose of this law is to:
  1. Establish a legal and regulatory framework for the permitting of carbon dioxide sequestration operations;
  2. Designate a state agency responsible for establishing standards and rules for the permitting of carbon dioxide sequestration operations including, but not limited to, rules pertaining to:
    1. Environmental surveillance of carbon dioxide sequestration operations;
    2. The monitoring of geologic migration of carbon dioxide and the detection of carbon dioxide excursions;
    3. Construction standards for carbon dioxide sequestration operations;
    4. Bonding or other financial assurances; and
    5. The closure of carbon dioxide sequestration operations, including post-closure monitoring, verification and maintenance; and to
  3. With the aid of a carbon dioxide sequestration working group, develop a long-term strategy for the regulation of carbon dioxide sequestration.
Carbon Dioxide Transportation and Sequestration Act (Illinois) Equipment Certification
Safety and Operational Guidelines
State/Province This Act applies to the application process for the issuance of a certificate of authority by an owner or operator of a pipeline designed, constructed, and operated to transport and to sequester carbon dioxide produced by a clean coal facility, by a clean coal substitute natural gas (SNG) facility, or by any other source that will result in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from that source. No person or entity may construct, operate, or repair a carbon dioxide pipeline unless the person or entity possesses a certificate of authority. Inasmuch as the regulation of the construction, maintenance, and operation of pipelines transporting carbon dioxide, whether interstate or intrastate, falls within the statutory and regulatory jurisdiction of the Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration of the federal Department of Transportation, each carbon dioxide pipeline owner shall construct, maintain, and operate all of its pipelines, related facilities, and equipment in this State in a manner that complies fully with all federal laws and regulations governing the construction, maintenance, and operation of pipelines transporting carbon dioxide, as from time to time amended, and which otherwise poses no undue risk to its employees or the public.
Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Environmental Regulations State/Province This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

Included in the chapter are rules governing emissions from biomass treatment facilities, natural gas, and any facility that emits steam or particulates into the air.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Division of Air Pollution Control has more information on regulatory programs, air monitoring, and permitting.
Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) Climate Policies State/Province Under this statute, the Director of Natural Resources will document and quantify carbon sequestration and greenhouse emissions reductions associated with agricultural practices, management systems, and land uses. This information will be used by the Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee to recommend policies or programs to aid Nebraska agricultural landowners in participating in systems of carbon trading, including potential policies or programs designed to optimize economic benefits to agricultural producers participating in carbon trading transactions, among other duties.
Caroline County - Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local This ordinance amends Chapter 175 of the Code of Public Local Laws of Caroline County, Maryland to provide for the erection, maintenance, and operation of small wind energy systems, as well as outlining guidelines and requirements for these systems.
Carroll County - Green Building Property Tax Credit (Maryland) Property Tax Incentive Local The state of Maryland permits Carroll County (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-308(e)) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if it chooses to do so.* Carroll County has exercised this option by offering property tax credits on buildings used for business, commercial, or industrial purposes that meet certain green building standards. The tax credits apply to green buildings that meet the requisite standards and are certified as such after May 5, 2009. The tax credit sunsets June 30, 2014 and no new credits will be issued after this date.

The tax credit uses the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED rating system and the Green Building Institute's Green Globe rating system as a metric for determining how "green" a building is. Buildings must receive a minimum LEED Silver or two Green Globes certification in order to be eligible for any tax credit. An equivalent certification under a county recognized system may also be used to qualify for the property tax credit. The property tax credit is determined as a percentage of county property taxes levied against the improved real property, and may be claimed for five consecutive years. Tax credit levels are as follows:


  • 25% for LEED Silver or equivalent
  • 50% for LEED Gold or equivalent
  • 75% for LEED Platinum or equivalent
No limitations on credit amounts per building or in aggregate are contained in the county legislation. Tax credit applications must be filed on or before May 1 of the year immediately preceding the taxable year for which the tax credit is sought. The tax credit program is administered by the Department of Economic Development, Department of Management and Budget, Department of the Comptroller, and Department of Planning.


*The state authorization contained in Md Code: Property Tax § 9-308(e) applies specifically to Carroll County. Several other counties in Maryland have adopted property tax credits for high performance buildings under another more generally applicable portion of the state code which makes a similar allowance (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242).
Carroll County - Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local This ordinance sets forth regulations for the zoning, erection, and operation of small wind energy systems in Carroll County, Maryland.
Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance (North Carolina) Solar/Wind Permitting Standards State/Territory Carteret County passed an ordinance to specify the permitting process and establish siting requirements for wind energy systems. There are different rules and a different permitting process depending on the size and location of a system. Small systems up to 25 kilowatts (kW) are considered to be an accessory use and do not require the approval of a Wind Energy Permit Application. Small systems attached to a house can have a maximum height of 60 feet and are not subject to minimum setbacks. Small systems not attached to a house can have a maximum height of 75 feet, but must be set back 1 foot for each foot of height from any property line and any vacant or occupied dwelling unit on the same property.

Larger systems over 25 kW must have a Wind Energy Permit Application approved by the Planning Commission before a building permit can be submitted. The ordinance goes into detail about the information required for the Wind Energy Permit Application. Systems over 25 kW and less than 1,000 kW can have a maximum height of 199 feet, and must be setback at least 1,300 feet from any adjacent property line. Systems 1,000 kW or more can have a height of 550 feet and must be setback 6 feet for each foot of height from any adjacent property line.

See ordinance for more details.
Cavern Protection (Texas) Siting and Permitting State/Province It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, “cave” means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and includes or is synonymous with cavern, pit, pothole, well, sinkhole, and grotto. No person may excavate, remove, destroy, injure, alter in any significant manner, or deface any part of a cave owned by the State of Texas, unless the person possesses a valid permit under this section. A permit may be obtained following the receipt of an application giving the reasons and objectives for the excavation, removal, or alteration and the benefits expected to be obtained from the contemplated work.
Central Georgia EMC - Photovoltaic Rebate Program (Georgia) Utility Rebate Program Utility In June 2008, Central Georgia Electric Membership Corporation (CGEMC) began offering a rebate of $450 per kilowatt (kW) to residential members who install photovoltaic (PV) systems that are interconnected and net-metered. To qualify, PV systems must have a warranty of five or more years and must be installed by a licensed contractor. In addition, PV systems are limited to 10 kW in capacity and must be installed in accordance with all applicable building and national electric codes.

Because Central Georgia EMC reserves the right to modify or cancel the program at any time without prior notification, interested members should contact Central Georgia EMC to ensure that a specific project is eligible for this incentive.
Certificate of Public Good--Gas and Electric (Vermont) Siting and Permitting State/Province This Public Service Board rule limits the construction of electric and natural gas facilities and restricts the amounts that companies can buy from non-Vermont sources. No company, as defined in section 201 of this title, may in any way purchase electric capacity or energy from outside the state; invest in an electric generation or transmission facility located outside this state unless the public service board first finds that the same will promote the general good of the state and issues a certificate to that effect.
Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) Equity Investment State/Province Certified Capital Companies (CAPCO), the creation of the Department of Economic Development (DED,) are venture capital firms which have certain requirements to make equity investments in eligible businesses in Missouri. To qualify for CAPCO funding, businesses must be independently owned, headquartered in Missouri and employ less than 200 persons before the investment is made. The annual revenue of the business in its last fiscal year must be less than $4 million, or, if the business is more than 3 years old, the revenue limit is $3 million. Service companies must also demonstrate that more than 33% of its revenue would be from outside the state of Missouri. At this point, all credits allowed under the law have been authorized.
Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) Siting and Permitting
Training/Technical Assistance
Local Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation has created, in partnership with Deloitte Consulting (Site Selector Consultant) and community partners, the Ready! Set! Build! Program, which provides consistent standards for industrial site certification in Wisconsin. Certification means that the key approvals, documentations, and assessments most commonly required for industrial uses will already be in place to assist businesses quickly locate on site. Wisconsin communities, organizations, or individuals with a site which has a minimum of 50 contiguous acres that can be developed are eligible for this funding.
Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and establishes a methodology to implement the antidegradation policy. The regulation establishes water quality standards that consist of designated legitimate uses of the surface waters of the commonwealth and the associated water quality criteria necessary to protect those uses. These water quality standards are minimum requirements that apply to all surface waters in the commonwealth of Kentucky in order to maintain and protect them for designated uses.
Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province The waste management administrative regulations apply to the disposal of solid waste and the management of all liquid, semisolid, solid, or gaseous waste defined or identified as hazardous in KRS Chapter 224 or the appropriate administrative regulations by all persons and state and federal agencies who engage in the generation, treatment, storage, or disposal of wastes, including hazardous substances spilled into the environment, that meet the criteria of hazardous waste. The regulation also sets forth the minimum environmental performance standards with which all waste sites or facilities shall comply. According to KRS Chapter 224, "Hazardous waste" means any discarded material or material intended to be discarded or substance or combination of such substances intended to be discarded, in any form which because of its quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may cause, or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible, or incapacitating reversible, illness or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, or disposed of, or otherwise managed. 
Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and the criteria for listing a hazardous waste. "Hazardous waste" means any discarded material or material intended to be discarded or substance or combination of such substances intended to be discarded, in any form which because of its quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may cause, or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible, or incapacitating reversible, illness or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, or disposed of, or otherwise managed. 
Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also establishes recordkeeping and reporting standards. This administrative regulation is equivalent to corresponding federal requirements except an annual report is required rather than a biennial report.
Chapter 37 Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province This administrative regulation establishes requirements for land disposal of hazardous waste. These include- surface impound exemptions, prohibitions on disposal and storage and treatment standards. This administrative regulation differs from the corresponding federal regulation in Section 8 of this administrative regulation, which has Kentucky specific information regarding standards to control metal emissions.
Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks, surface impoundments, waste piles, equipment and air emissions control for tanks, surface impoundments and containers.
Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations
Fees
Siting and Permitting
State/Province This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or facilities, and the standards for certification of operators. This administrative regulation sets forth the classification of solid waste sites or facilities for permitting purposes. The regulation applies specifically to landfills. It also provides information about permits, solid waste permit fees from the Kentucky Division of Waste Management and the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection. By-products from coal mining are excluded from the definition of solid waste.
Chapter 50 Division for Air Quality: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province Chapter 50 of the Division of Air Quality section within Energy and Environment Cabinet Department For Environmental Protection outlines the general administrative procedures for maintaining air quality standards. These procedures are created in adherence to 42 USC 7410 which requires the state to implement standards for national primary and secondary ambient air quality. All major sources of VOCs located in a county or portion of a county which is designated ozone nonattainment, for any nonattainment classification except marginal, under 401 KAR 51:010, shall install and use control technology which is reasonable and available. If no Control Techniques Guidelines Document is appropriate, the lowest emission limit that a particular source is capable of meeting by the application of control technology that is reasonably available considering technological and economic feasibility. The cabinet may require technology that has been applied to similar, but not necessarily identical source categories. In the absence of a standard specified in these administrative regulations, all major air contaminant sources shall as a minimum apply control procedures that are reasonable, available, and practical. Nothing in these administrative regulations is intended to permit a practice which is in violation of a statute, ordinance, or administrative regulation. These administrative regulations shall be complementary to each other, and to other administrative regulations adopted by the cabinet. If a provision of these administrative regulations or the application thereof to a person or circumstance is held to be invalid, the invalidity shall not affect other provisions or application of another part of these administrative regulations and to this end each provision of these administrative regulations and the various applications thereof are declared to be severable. Except as provided by 401 KAR 50:055, nothing in these administrative regulations shall allow a source to remove control equipment or discontinue procedures previously required in a nonattainment area to achieve the national ambient air quality standards until a state implementation plan containing different requirements has been approved by the U.S. EPA. For the purpose of applying the definition of modification, an increase in the amount of an air pollutant shall be determined as in 40 CFR 60.14.
Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department for Environmental Protection. This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions as related to new air pollution sources with respect to the prevention of significant deterioration of air quality and construction of stationary sources impacting on nonattainment areas. The purpose of chapter 51 is to prevent the significant deterioration of air quality in areas of the state where the air quality is better than the ambient air quality standards outlined in 401 KAR 53:010; and to provide conditions for the construction of new or modified sources which would impact on nonattainment areas in order that major or new or major modified sources will not exacerbate existing violations of the ambient air quality standards. These regulations state that the owner of an affected facility subject to this chapter shall be subject to the performance testing regulations found in 401 KAR 59:005, section 2. The owner or operator of an affected facility subject to this chapter is also subject to the notification and recordkeeping provisions found in 401 KAR 59:0005, Section 3. The Cabinet, as defined by KRS 224.01-010(9), may require the owner or operator of an affected facility subject to this chapter to install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems. All such emission monitoring systems shall be subject to the provisions of 401 KAR 59:005, Section 4, and other provisions as the cabinet deems necessary. "Affected facility" means an apparatus, building, operation, road, or other entity or series of entities that emits or may emit an air contaminant into the outdoor atmosphere. These regulations also cover the NOx requirements for stationary internal combustion engines, NOx requirements for large utility and industrial boilers, NOx credits for early reduction and emergency, Banking and trading if NOx allowances, NOx opt-in provisions, CAIR Ox Annual Trading Program, CAIR NOx ozone season trading program and the CAIR SO2 Trading Program.
Chapter 52 Air Quality: Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 52, entitled Air Quality: Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 52 outlines the permitting requirements for all air pollution sources within the state; the chapter includes application procedures, the application review process, the necessary steps to maintain and renew permits, and the monitoring, notification and maintenance standards for all air pollution sources. The following permits are covered in chapter 52: Title V permits, Federally enforceable permits for nonmajor sources, State-origin permits, Permit Applications Forms and Acid rain permits. Chapter 52 also outlines the review process which has public, state and EPA (federal) phases.
Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
State/Province Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the primary ambient air quality standards is to define levels of air quality that the cabinet judges are necessary, with an adequate margin of safety, to protect the public health. Secondary ambient air quality standards define levels of air quality which the cabinet judges necessary to protect the public welfare from any known or anticipated adverse effects of a pollutant. Chapter 53 implements the federal standard for all air pollutants and requires that Within sixty (60) days of promulgation or revision of any ambient air quality standard by the U.S. EPA, the cabinet shall initiate proceedings to promulgate or review this administrative regulation in conformance with the federal ambient air quality standards.
Chapter 63 Air Quality: General Standards of Performance (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations State/Province Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 63, entitled Air Quality: General Standards of Performance, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department for Environmental Protection.

Chapter 63 adopts the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) codified in 40 C.F.R. 63.1 through 63.56, 63.70 through 63.81, and 63.100 through 63.11434. Delegation of implementation and enforcement authority for the federal NESHAP program from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to the Commonwealth of Kentucky is provided under 42 U.S.C. 7412(l).

Reasonable precautions must be taken to prevent particulate matter from becoming airborne from any material handled, processed, transported, or stored; or from a building or its appurtenances to be constructed, altered, repaired, or demolished, or a road to be used.

When dust, fumes, gases, mist, odorous matter, vapors, or any combination escape from a building or equipment that cause a nuisance or violate any administrative regulation, the Secretary may order that the building or equipment in which processing, handling and storage are done be tightly closed and ventilated in such a way that all air and gases and air or gas-borne material leaving the building or equipment are treated by removal or destruction of air contaminants before discharge to the open air.

Persons responsible for a source from which hazardous matter or toxic substances may be emitted must provide the utmost care and consideration, in the handling of these materials, to the potentially harmful effects of the emissions resulting from such activities.

Facilities may not emit potentially hazardous matter or toxic substances in such quantities or duration as to be harmful to the health and welfare of humans, animals and plants. Evaluation of such facilities as to adequacy of controls and/or procedures and emission potential will be made on an individual basis by the cabinet.
Charles County - Agricultural Preservation Districts - Renewable Generation Allowed (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.
Chesapeake Bay Preservation Programs (Multiple States) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Chesapeake Bay Program is a unique regional partnership that has led and directed the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay since 1983. The Chesapeake Bay Program partners include the states of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia; the District of Columbia; the Chesapeake Bay Commission, a tri-state legislative body; the Environmental Protection Agency, representing the federal government; and participating citizen advisory groups.

The Chesapeake Executive Council was established by the Chesapeake Bay Agreement of 1983. Under the 1987 Chesapeake Bay Agreement, membership changed from cabinet secretaries to the governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia; the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; the mayor of the District of Columbia; and the chair of the Chesapeake Bay Commission, a legislative body serving Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

The Council: (a) Establishes the policy direction for the restoration and protection of the Bay and its living resources; (b) Exerts leadership to marshal public support for the Bay effort; (c) Signs directives, agreements and amendments that set goals and guide policy for Bay restoration; and (d) Is accountable to the public for progress made under the Bay agreements.

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality administers complementary programs and regulations to prevent future pollution and degradation of the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding lands. More information can be found here: http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/ChesapeakeBay.aspx
Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries (Maryland) Environmental Regulations Local This legislation sets limits on development near Chesapeake Bay as well as on dredging and the deposition of dredged material into the bay. The legislation establishes the Cox Creek Citizens Oversight Committee (now mostly defunct); the Hart-Miller-Pleasure Island Oversight Committee, which provides oversight and monitoring of the future development, use, and maintenance of the Hart-Miller-Pleasure Island chain, and the water quality in the area immediately surrounding the islands; the Kent Island Citizens Oversight Committee (now defunct).
Chesapeake Bay, Drilling for Oil or Gas Prohibited (Virginia) Environmental Regulations Local Drilling for oil or gas in the waters or within 500 hundred feet from the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay or any of its tributaries is prohibited. If a person or entity desires to drill for oil or gas in any area of Tidewater Virginia where drilling is not prohibited, an environmental impact assessment is required as part of the permit to the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy. Other provisions under the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality then apply. No permits for oil production wells will be issued until the Governor has had an opportunity to review the report and make recommendations, in the public interest, for legislative and regulatory changes, and that legislation has become effective.
Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These lands make up 12 percent of the productive forests in the region, which in the past produced 15-20 percent of the region's annual timber harvest.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources manages the land, and periodically updates the Sustainable Forest Management Plan. The plan includes information on powerline right-of-ways, protected areas, and acceptable uses for the area.

The state bought the land for the purpose of supporting the Eastern Shore's forest products industry, the second largest industry on the Eastern Shore, which adds $349 million to the State's economy and employs more than 2,100 people. The purposes is also to maintain the ecological integrity of the area, including water quality and habitat.

The Department involves the public in the management plan development, which is reviewed every couple of years. The public's comments will be considered as plans are developed for resource management, watershed enhancement, facility development or public use.
Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program (Massachusetts) Utility Rebate Program Utility Chicopee Electric Light offered rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per installation.

Customers are required to follow Chicopee Electric Light's Distributed Generation Policy and should refer to the solar rebate application for additional requirements.
City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program (Illinois) Utility Rebate Program Utility City Water, Light and Power (CWLP) is offering residential and commercial customers a $1,500 per kilowatt (kW) rebate for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems with a maximum rebate of up to $7,500 per household and $15,000 per business. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per customer account. In order to obtain an application, contact the CWLP Energy Services Office directly using the email or phone number below. Applicants must have CWLP metered electric service and must obtain pre-approval from the CWLP before purchasing equipment. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis, until the program funds are exhausted.SOLAR REWARDS Application Packet
City of Ann Arbor - Green Power Purchasing (Michigan) Green Power Purchasing Local In May 2006, the Ann Arbor City Council adopted a resolution that established a goal of 30% renewable energy for all municipal operations by 2010, with an associated 20% reduction in greenhouse gases. The resolution also established a goal of 20% renewable energy for the entire Ann Arbor community by 2015. In July 2009, the EPA announced that the city of Ann Arbor was among the top-20 users of on-site renewable energy in the nation. The city generates and uses roughly 8.9 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually from green energy sources, primarily biogas, solar, and small hydroelectric facilities. This amounts to roughly 20% of the annual electricity consumption in city facilities. The city came short of its 2010 goal, achieving 19.8% renewables by 2010. In April 2011, the City Council passed a new goal to reach 30% renewables by 2015 (compared to 2000 levels) in municipal operations, and 5% renewables community-wide. The resolution also encourages the city staff to reach this goal using long-term, fixed-rate contracts with in-state wind generation.
City of Austin - Zoning Code (Texas) Solar/Wind Access Policy Local The Zoning Code (Chapter 25-2) of the Austin City Code provides a height limitation exemption for solar installations. Solar installations may exceed the zoning district height limit by 15% or the amount necessary to comply with a federal or state regulation, whichever is greater. The Zoning Code also allows for preservation plan in historic districts to incorporate sustainability measures such as solar technologies and other energy generation and efficiency mechanisms.
City of Bloomington - Sustainable Development Incentives (Indiana) Green Building Incentive Local The City of Bloomington offers fee waivers and other design incentives for developers that incorporate the city's sustainability goals. The city's four goals include:


  • Energy and resource efficiency including green roofs, improved building performance rating, non-polluting energy resources, renewable on-site energy sources, recycling and/or salvaging at least 50% of non-hazardous construction and demolition debris, and utilizing building materials and products sourced within a 500 mile radius.
  • Landscape and site design including vegetation, storm water, recycled greywater, and permeable pavement technologies.
  • Public policy including policies that incorporate mixed-use development and promote alternative transportation.
  • Public transportation including locating projects near transit stops, downtown, multi-use trails, public schools, parks, or activity centers.

Incentives are based on a tier system with three different levels:


  • Level 1 Requirements: At least 2 energy and resource efficiency projects, 1 landscape and site design project, 1 public policy project, and 1 public transportation project.
  • Level 2 Requirements: At least 3 energy and resource efficiency projects, 2 landscape and site design projects, 2 public policy projects, and 2 public transportation projects.
  • Level 3 Requirements: At least 4 energy and resource efficiency projects, 2 landscape and site design projects, 2 public policy projects, 2 public transportation projects. In addition, at least 15% of housing must be allocated for affordable housing units.

All 3 levels are eligible for fee waivers of filing fees with the plan commission and/or board of zoning appeals, fees associated with right-of-way excavation permits, and sewer hook-on fees. In addition, projects may be subject to less strict development standards.


  • Level 1 Residential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased to 6 feet and rear building setbacks decreased to 20 feet.
  • Level 1 Nonresidential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased by 25%, rear building setbacks decreased by 25%, and maximum residential density increased by 25%.
  • Level 2 Residential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased to 5 feet and rear building setbacks decreased to 15 feet.
  • Level 2 Nonresidential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased by 50%, rear building setbacks decreased by 50%, and maximum residential density increased by 50%.
  • Level 3 Residential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased to 5 feet and rear building setbacks decreased to 15 feet.
  • Level 3 Nonresidential Incentives: Side building setbacks decreased by 50%, rear building setbacks decreased by 50%, and maximum residential density increased by 75%.
City of Boston - Green Power Purchasing (Massachusetts) Green Power Purchasing Local In April 2007, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino issued an executive order that established a green power purchasing goal of 11% for the city government, effective immediately, and a goal of 15% by 2012. The executive order also requires all existing municipal properties to be evaluated for the feasibility of installing solar, wind, bio-energy, combined heat and power (CHP), and green roofs. (The executive order updated an announcement by Mayor Menino in 2006 that the city government would purchase 8.6% of its power from renewable energy sources as part of its EPA Green Power Partnership.)

The executive order also contains goals for greenhouse gas emissions reductions, recycling, green building, vehicle fuel efficiency, biofuels use, and the development of the Boston Energy Alliance, a non-profit corporation dedicated to implementing large-scale energy efficiency, renewable energy, and demand response projects citywide.

In April 2008, Mayor Menino announced that the city will install over $1 million of solar thermal and PV on four municipal buildings by 2009. This announcement is part of the Solar Boston program to promote the development of large-scale solar energy market growth throughout Boston, and to position the city to increase the amount of installed solar capacity from 500 kilowatts (kW) at the time of the announcement to 25 megawatts (MW) by 2015.
City of Brenham - Net Metering (Texas) Net Metering Utility In September 2010, the City of Brenham passed an ordinance adopting net metering and interconnection procedures. Customer generators up to 10 megawatts (MW) are eligible to participate, although customer generators with systems 20 kilowatts (kW) or less are eligible for a separate rider and expedited interconnection. The utility will install and maintain a meter capable of measuring flow of electricity in both directions. Any net excess generation (NEG) is credited on a monthly basis at the utility's avoided cost rate.

The ordinance includes a standard form interconnection application and agreement as well as standard riders. Customers must provide all equipment necessary to meet applicable safety, power quality and interconnection requirements established by the National Electric Code (NEC), the National Electrical Safety Code, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Underwriters Laboratories (UL), and any applicable local and state agencies.

Net-metered customers with systems greater than 20 kW must maintain general liability insurance for personal injury and property damage of at least $500,000 per occurrence and $1,000,000 aggregate; systems 20 kW or less are exempt from the insurance requirements as long as the system's inverter is UL 1741 listed and meets IEEE 1547 requirements. A disconnect switch that is easily visible and accessible to City of Brenham employees is required for all systems. The customer generator is responsible for paying related interconnection costs (including interconnection studies, if required) and must pass a field inspection prior to generating.
City of Chicago - Green Permit Program (Illinois) Green Building Incentive Local The City of Chicago encourages building design, construction and renovation in a manner that provides healthier environments, reduces operating costs and conserves energy and resources through their Green Permit Program. The Chicago Department of Buildings (DOB) Green Permit Program provides developers and owners with an incentive to build green by streamlining the permit process timeline for projects which are designed to maximize indoor air quality and conserve energy and resources.

Green Permit Program Incentives

Projects accepted into the Green Permit Program can receive permits in less than 30 business days or in as little as 15 business days. The number of green building elements included in the project plans and project complexity determines the length of the timeline. In addition, projects which meet the most stringent sustainability guidelines may also qualify for a partial waiver of consultant code review fees, up to $25,000.

Application Procedure
Interested applicants must involve DOB early in the design process. DOB will help to guide the applicant through the process to ensure the shortest permitting process time.

Acceptance into the Green Permit Program is based on a series of requirements that qualifies the project for one of two different Benefit Tiers of green building certification:


  • Commercial projects must earn certification within the appropriate Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council.
  • Smaller residential projects must earn a two-star or greater rating under the Chicago Green Homes program.
Both commercial and small residential projects are also required to earn from one to three menu items, or additional green design strategies above and beyond certification prerequisites, in order to be eligible for permitting privileges.
City of Chicago - Green Power Purchasing (Illinois) Green Power Purchasing Local In June 2001, the City of Chicago signed an agreement with Commonwealth Edison and the Environmental Resources Trust to purchase 20% of its electricity from clean, renewable resources by the end of 2005. The city reached this goal in 2008, the city with a purchase of 215 million kWh of wind and biomass energy from MidAmerican Energy. The city's plan is to maintain that 20% level for the foreseeable future. As of October 2011, the City was purchasing 20% of their power from renewables. For more green power purchasing program listings, visit the U.S. Department of Energy Green Power Network.
City of Chicago - Small Business Improvement Fund (Illinois) Local Grant Program Local SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund for the City of Chicago. The fund utilizes revenue from Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and supports commercial and industrial properties, as well as tenants, within specific TIF districts to upgrade their facilities. Certain energy efficient upgrades, such as energy efficient windows, HVAC systems, and roofs may qualify for funding under this program and are encouraged.

The grants can cover up to 75% of the costs of the upgrades and are paid after the work is completed and expenses paid-up.


Commercial applicants are eligible if they have a maximum of $5 million in gross sales for each of the past three years. New commercial businesses must use projected sales. Industrial applicants may not employ more than 100 full-time equivalent employees. Landlord applicants may not have more than a net worth of $6 million, with total liquidity of no more than $500,000. Tenant applicants may not have more than $5 million in gross sales, and must have a leasehold interest in the property with at least 3 years remaining on the lease term. Additional eligibility requirements applicable, interested parties should contact SomerCor 504 Inc for additional details.
City of Dallas - Green Energy Purchasing (Texas) Green Power Purchasing Local In September 2007, the City of Dallas finalized purchase contracts for more than 333 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green electricity for city facilities during 2008. The city has elected to continue its green power purchasing program through 2013. The purchase amounts to roughly 40% of total expected electricity consumption by municipal facilities for the year and will be supplied completely by wind generated electricity. It puts Dallas in the fourth spot on the EPA's Green Power Partner listing of local government green energy purchases (as of January 2011). Prior to this, Dallas engaged in a separate purchase of roughly 30 million kWh of green energy for the street lighting component of city electricity consumption for 2007. The City of Dallas also has green building requirements for new municipal structures and adopted green building standards for private developments in April 2008 for new construction as of 2009.
City of Danville - Net Metering (Virginia) Net Metering Local For a renewable fuel generator with a capacity of 25 kilowatts (kW) or less, a notification form shall be submitted at least 30 days prior to the date the customer intends to interconnect their renewable fuel generator to the Utility's facilities. Renewable fuel generators with capacity over 25 kW are required to submit forms no later than 60 days prior to planned interconnection. The Utility will review and determine whether the requirements for Interconnection have been met. More information on this process may be found in the Danville Utility Commission's Electric Rate Schedule and Riders.

A customer may begin operation of their renewable energy generator once the conditions of interconnection have been met. These include:

   * Notification to utility of intent to interconnect
   * Installation of a lockable, utility accessible, load breaking manual disconnect switch
   * Certification of manual disconnect switch by a licensed electrician
   * Compliance with IEEE Standard 1547, Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems, certified by vendor
   * Utility inspection of static and nonstatic inverter-connected renewable fuel generators
   * Requirements specific to systems generating over 25kW are held to further requirements available in the Electric Rate Schedule and Riders

Interconnection of a net metering system will not be allowed if installation will cause the total generated AC current capacity of all interconnected renewable energy generators within the utility service to exceed 1.0% of the most recent peak load.

Renewable fuel generators with a rated capacity less than 10kW shall maintain homeowners, commercial, or other insurance providing coverage in the amount of at least $100,000 for the liability of the insured against loss arising out of the use of a renewable fuel generator, and for a renewable fuel generator with a rated capacity exceeding 10kW such coverage shall be in the amount of at least $300,000.
City of Grand Rapids - Green Power Purchasing Policy (Michigan) Green Power Purchasing Local In 2005, the City of Grand Rapids established a goal of purchasing 20% of its municipal power demand from renewable energy by 2008. In November 2007, the city signed a three-year agreement with a three-year renewable with Consumers Energy to purchase Green-e Certified blocks of renewable energy valued at a reduced rate. This purchase agreement is equivalent to roughly 15% of municipal electricity consumption, which, coupled with the 5% renewable-energy component of Consumer's Energy base load generation, met the 20% goal established in 2005. The city offset the additional cost of this green electricity purchase by exploring energy and cost savings opportunities in cooperation and through energy efficiency efforts with support from grant funds and capital projects. The Mayor has also established a further goal of purchasing 100% of the city's municipal electricity consumption from renewable energy by 2020. Due to significant energy efficiency efforts, and energy consumption reduction, as of November 2011, the city is purchasing 22% of its energy from renewable sources.
City of Houston - Green Power Purchasing (Texas) Green Power Purchasing Local In 2007, the City of Houston negotiated a 5-year contract with Reliant Energy for up to 80 MW or 700 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually of renewable energy credits (RECs). These RECs will be generated almost exclusively from wind power. The purchase began in July 2008 at 40 MW, equivalent to roughly 350 million kWh annually or 25% of the annual electricity consumption of the city's municipal facilities. Additional 10 MW increments of renewable energy are authorized to be stepped in over time up to the 80 MW specified in the contract. As of January 2012, the purchase had been increased to 50 MW, equivalent to roughly 438 million kWh annually approximately 35% of annual electricity consumption in city facilities. This diversification of Houston's energy portfolio is expected to help insulate the city from price shocks such as those that occurred in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Between January 2009 and December 2012, Houston has captured the second spot on the EPA's Green Power Partner list of green energy purchases by local governments.
City of Lansing - Green Power Purchasing Policy (Michigan) Green Power Purchasing Local By an executive order from the Mayor's Office, City of Lansing facilities are now required to procure 10% of their energy consumption from renewable sources by 2010, escalating to 15% in 2015 and 20% in 2020. This green power purchasing policy is part of a broader initiative designed to reduce the contribution that city facilities make to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Several additional provisions apart from green power procurement are contained in the order, among them a goal of reducing energy use in city facilities by 10% as soon as it is practical and mandates that city facilities purchase EPA Energy Star certified appliances and hybrid/renewable fuel vehicles unless an otherwise demonstrable need exists.
City of Lauderhill - Revolving Loan Program (Florida) Local Loan Program Local The City of Lauderhill offers insterst free loans for EnergyStar appliances through a municipal revolving loan program. Loans from $400 to $2,000 are available to homeowners purchasing new Energy Star certified appliances from eligible retailers. Tankless water heaters, solar photovoltaic systems and solar water heating systems are also eligible for the loan program. Loan funds must be repaid within a two year period. Eligibility will be determined within 10 business days.


Loan funds are made payable directly to the retailer within a week of the time the final loan documents are signed. A check will be made payable to retailer, must have quote or invoice from retailer with name of retailer and address. For Solar Powered Systems, the check will be made payable to the contractor with a 10% holdback. The holdback check will be released upon submittal of a Completion Certificate signed by both the borrower and the contractor and copies of all required city permits (if applicable). Any costs in excess of the contractors bid/quote will be the customer’s responsibility.


Loan applications are available through the program web site.
City of Longwood - Raising Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Florida) Local Rebate Program Local The City of Longwood offers the Raising Energy Efficiency Program (REEP) to owner occupied residences within the City of Longwood for making energy efficiency improvements to their properties while supporting local businesses.


In order to qualify, applicants must utilize contractors, suppliers or other businesses located in the City of Longwood to make their improvements eligible for the rebate program. Rebate amounts vary based upon efficiency upgrade with a maximum rebate amount of $500 a year per household. A full list of eligible improvements and application instructions can be found on the REEP web site.
City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program Local Loan Program Local Green Madison is a revolving loan program for residential energy efficiency improvements. Loans are available for owner-occupied single family residences or owner-occupied multi-family residences of up to three units. Property must be located within the City of Madison. To sign up for the program, interested residents should use the sign up form on the program web site. Residents may also receive cash incentives in addition to the loans through the Residential Incentives Program.
City of Madison - Green Power Purchasing (Wisconsin) Green Power Purchasing Local In 1999, Madison’s Metro Maintenance and Administration Facility began purchasing 25% of its electricity from Madison Gas and Electric’s wind power program. The additional cost to purchase the wind power is approximately $26,000 per year. Metro officials estimate that their wind power purchase is equivalent to running ten buses per year with no carbon monoxide emissions. In 2005, the city established a goal to increase the entire city’s electricity purchases to 10% renewable energy by 2006 and 20% renewable energy by 2010.

In March 2007, the City of Madison Common Council passed a resolution to purchase 10% of its electricity from renewable sources in 2007 and 20% by 2011. The city budget was amended to make available $17,000 for the purchase of renewable energy credits (RECs), with a stated preference for those originating in Dane and Madison counties. The Council also resolved to encourage community participation in renewable energy programs through its own Clean Energy Challenge Program, with a goal of being recognized as an EPA Green Power Partner (consumer purchases of green electricity amounting to 2% of total consumption). In 2011, the City now purchases 22% of renewable energy through the Madison Gas and Electric's Green Power Tomorrow program.

In November 2009, the City passed a resolution to join the Wisconsin Energy Independent Community Partnership and become and Energy Independent Community. In joining the Partnership, the City resolved to procure 25% of the City's electricity and transportation fuels from renewable resources by 2025. According to the 2011 Madison Sustainability Plan, the City plans to continue increasing its purchases.
City of Milwaukee - Milwaukee Shines Solar Financing (Wisconsin) Local Loan Program Local Beginning July 28, 2011, the City of Milwaukee will be offering low-interest loans for solar energy under its Milwaukee Shines Solar Financing program. Loans are available to homeowners of 1-3 unit, owner-occupied homes in Milwaukee. Interest rate maximum is prime rate plus 2.5%, and as low as prime plus 1.5%. Loans are limited to $20,000 and 15 years. Eligible equipment includes solar electric systems of up to 6 kilowatts (kW) and solar hot water systems of up to 8 panels. Projects must be installed by a Focus on Energy Residential Ally installer. Installers can be found here.


The Milwaukee Shines program is also offering a $1,000 cash-back reward to the first 20 participants in the loan program.


Application information is available on the Milwaukee Shines web site.
Net Metering (New Orleans, Louisiana) Net Metering Local In May 2007, the New Orleans City Council adopted net-metering rules that are similar to rules adopted by the Louisiana Public Service Commission (PSC) in November 2005. The City Council's rules require Entergy New Orleans, an investor-owned utility regulated by the city, to offer net metering to customers with systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, geothermal or biomass resources. Fuel cells and microturbines that generate electricity entirely derived from eligible renewable resources are also eligible. The City Council's rules apply to residential facilities with a maximum capacity of 25 kilowatts (kW), and to commercial and agricultural systems with a maximum capacity of 300 kW. In June 2008, Louisiana SB 359 increased the maximum capacity of commercial and agricultural systems to 300 kW. In September 2009, the New Orleans City Council formally adopted this change and it is now effective for customers of Entergy New Orleans. (These limits and other details are specified in Louisiana’s net-metering law, which applies to all utilities in the state.) Applications and other relevant information are located on the Entergy Net Metering website.

Utilities must provide customer-generators with a meter capable of measuring the flow of electricity in both directions, or, if the existing meter is incapable of registering bi-directional electricity flow, an additional meter or meters capable of registering bi-directional electricity flow. Utilities must pay for the cost of the meter itself, but utilities may assess a “one-time customer charge” to cover the installation costs. The “customer charge” may include the cost of a mandatory accuracy test of the customer's meter or meters, performed by the utility. Net metering customers are required to have a manual disconnect located on the outside of their building and accessible to Entergy New Orleans 24 hours a day.

Customers must pay for “interconnection costs,” which are defined as “the reasonable costs of connection, switching, metering, transmission, distribution, safety provisions and administrative costs incurred by the [utility] directly related to the installation and maintenance of the physical facilities necessary to permit interconnected operations” with a net-metered system, “to the extent the costs are in excess of the corresponding costs which the [utility] would have incurred if it had not engaged in interconnected operations, but instead generated an equivalent amount of electric energy itself or purchased an equivalent amount of electric energy or capacity from other sources.” In addition, the City Council may authorize the utility to assess a customer “a greater fee or customer charge, of any type,” if the utility's “direct costs of interconnection and administration of net metering outweigh the distribution system, environmental and public policy benefits of allocating the costs among the ... utility’s entire customer base.”

Net excess generation (NEG) is credited at the utility's retail rate and carried over to the customer’s next bill indefinitely. For the final month in which the customer takes service from the utility, the utility will pay the customer for the balance of any credit at the utility’s avoided-cost rate.

Customers must notify the utility at least 90 days prior to the date of interconnection. The utility must use a standard interconnection agreement approved by the City Council. Systems must meet all safety and performance standards established by local and national electric codes and performance standards, including the NEC, IEEE, UL, NESC and any other relevant codes specified by the City Council. An external disconnect switch is required.
City of Philadelphia - Green Power Purchasing (Pennsylvania) Green Power Purchasing Local Philadelphia has committed to purchasing green power to supply 20% of the city's electricity by 2015.* In doing so, the city is exceeding the Pennsylvania Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard, which requires 11.2% renewables and "alternative" energy resources by 2015. Philadelphia also has a goal of producing 57.7 megawatts (MW) of solar power by 2021, of which 3.8 MW is currently on-line. The city's 2012 Greenworks Progress Report indicates that through the end of 2011, 12.2% of the electricity used in Philadelphia was sourced from alternative energy resources. The city is exploring a variety of complementary policies and programs to help achieve this goal, including solar power purchase agreements for public buildings, revised solar zoning and permitting guidelines, and an aggregate electricity purchasing program for local businesses (Philly Buying Power).


*In contrast to renewable energy purchasing goals of many local governments, Philadelphia's initiative targets total electricity use within the city as opposed to only purchases made by the city itself. This distinction is significant because the city itself is already making alternative energy purchases equivalent to 20% of municipal government needs.
City of Philadelphia - Streamlined Solar Permitting and Fee Reduction (Pennsylvania) Green Building Incentive Local Photovoltaic systems of 10 kW or less installed on 1- or 2-family residential units are eligible for streamlined permitting and a fee reduction. PV projects can use a combined electrical and building permit instead of filling out two separate permits if the project meets certain installation and electrical requirements (as outlined on the combined permit form). In addition, electrical and building permit fees for all PV projects are reduced to $25 per $1,000 labor - lowered from the standard $25 per $1,000 of labor and equipment costs. This treatment was established by separate bills relating to electrical permits and building permits enacted in late 2011. Philadelphia has a Solar Installation Guidebook to assist residents and builders in Philadelphia through the process of obtaining the necessary permits and installing solar.
City of Riverhead - Energy Conservation Device Permitting Fees (New York) Green Building Incentive Local In 2006 the Town of Riverhead on Long Island enacted a special allowance in its building permit fee structure to provide a discount to people wishing to install energy conservation devices on residential or commercial buildings. The provision in the town code applies to any energy conservation device "installed in or on a structure which qualifies for any federal, state or local tax exemption, tax credit or tax rebate", but explicitly mentions solar panels as eligible for favorable treatment. The original law authorized a flat permitting fee of $150, which still generally applies, but the law was amended in December 2011 to create a "Fast-Track" process for residential systems that meet certain technical requirements (e.g., maximum roof loading, mounting orientation). The fee for Fast-Track applications is set at $50 and the process also entitles the applicant to expedited review (14 days). Applicants subject to review by the Landmarks Preservation Commission or the Architectural Review Board are not eligible for the Fast-Track process. Prior to the code revision permitting fees for solar panel installations often approached $1,000.
City of San Marcos - Distributed Generation Rebate Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility The City of San Marcos offers a Distributed Generation Rebate Program for the installation of grid-tied renewable energy systems. The Distributed Generation Rebate Program is offered on a first-come/first-serve basis and is open to all City of San Marcos electric utility customers with an account in good standing.


Qualifying Solar PV systems are eligible for a $2.50 per Watt (W) rebate up to $5,000. Qualifying Wind Generation systems are eligible for a $1.00 per W rebate up to $5,000. Neither rebate amount can exceed 50% of the system installation costs. Renewable energy systems are required to be warranted for minimum time periods as follows:


  • Installation - 1 year
  • Wind Generator - 5 years
  • PV Modules - 20 years
  • Inverter - 5 years

Rebated products must be installed within the San Marcos electric utility service area, and must remain in use at the originating address for the lifetime of the product. Should the system be removed, the customer will be billed a pro-rated amount of the original rebate based on 80% after 1 year, 60% after 2 years, 40% after 3 years, and 20% after 4 years.


Rebate funds are not applicable to used equipment, maintenance agreements, warranties, re-roofing or structural work, batteries, or leases.
City of Sunset Valley - PV Rebate Program (Texas) Local Rebate Program Local The City of Sunset Valley offers rebates to local homeowners who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The local rebate acts as an add-on to the PV rebates that are offered by Austin Energy to its electric customers.

The Sunset Valley rebate is $1.00 per watt (W) up to 3,000 W. In order to qualify for the Sunset Valley rebate, the system must first qualify for an Austin Energy rebate. In addition, the system installation cost must be $6 per 1,000 W or less.


The Sunset Valley rebates are in addition to the Austin Energy rebate of $2.50 per watt AC up to $15,000 per installation. In order to participate in the program, local residents must first be approved for a rebate through the Austin Energy program and meet the corresponding equipment, warranty, and installation requirements. This means that local residents of utilities other than Austin Energy are not eligible to participate in the Sunset Valley program.

Please see the program website or use the contact information below to obtain more information about this offer.
City of Tallahassee Utilities - Solar Loans (Florida) Utility Loan Program Utility The City of Tallahassee Utilities offers loans with an interest rate of 5% for a variety of energy-saving measures, including photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water-heating systems. Under this program, customers may borrow up to $20,000 for PV systems and $10,000 for solar water-heating systems (including pool heating). Loan payments are to be made on monthly utility bills. Customers must first get a vendor price or a contractor's proposal and send it to the utility Energy Services. A city energy audit is required for all solar technology installations. Installation work should not begin until after a signed Loan Promissory Note has been received.


Solar water heating systems must be Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) certified indirect or drain-back systems. Loans will not be awarded if the system is replacing a natural gas water heater. PV systems must also be FSEC certified. An energy audit is required for all solar measures.


For detailed information on the loan process, see the loan handbook or call the utility's energy services department at (850) 891-4968.
Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana) Siting and Permitting State/Province The purpose of the Clean Air Act of Montana is to achieve and maintain levels of air quality to "protect human health and safety and, to the greatest degree practicable, prevent injury to plant and animal life and property, foster the comfort and convenience of the people, promote the economic and social development of this state, and facilitate the enjoyment of the natural attractions of this state." It is also the purpose of the Act to achieve these goals without unduly compromising individual freedoms. The Act supports the establishment of local and regional air pollution control programs, and provides for a coordinated statewide program of air pollution prevention, abatement, and control. The Act addresses emissions from electricity generating facilities, fossil fuels, and small business stationary sources; ambient air quality standards, monitoring, and reporting; permitting and operating requirements for sources of air pollution; and local air pollution control programs.
Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) Siting and Permitting State/Province Michigan implements the federal requirements of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) through state regulations. Michigan's Rule 821 requires subject sources to obtain and operate in compliance with a CAIR Annual NOx Budget permit and/or CAIR Ozone NOx Budget permit. Rule 420 requires subject sources to obtain and operate in compliance with a CAIR SO2 Budget permit. All CAIR Budget permits must be issued and renewed in keeping with Michigan's Renewable Operating Permit program procedures.
Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky) Property Tax Incentive State/Province Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit provides for a property tax credit for new clean coal facilities constructed at a cost exceeding $150 million and used for the purposes of generating electricity. Before the credit is given, the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet must certify that a facility is reducing emissions of pollutants released during electric generation through the use of clean coal equipment and technologies. The amount of the allowable credit is $2 per ton of eligible coal purchased that is used to generate electric power at a certified clean coal facility. The credit shall not be carried forward and must be used on the tax return filed for the period during which the eligible coal was purchased.
Clean Coal Projects (Virginia) Siting and Permitting State/Province This legislation directs the Virginia Air Pollution Control Board to facilitate the construction and implementation of clean coal projects by expediting the permitting process for such projects.
Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Siting and Permitting State/Province A public utility may not use clean coal technology at a new or existing electric generating facility without first applying for and obtaining from the Utility Regulatory Commission a certificate that states that public convenience and necessity will be served by the use of clean coal technology. Some exemptions apply. This statute describes the requirements for obtaining a certificate of necessity.
Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) Grant Program
Industry Recruitment/Support
Federal The Clean Electrical Power Generation (CEPG) SSA consists of research and development (R&D) and late-stage development and demonstration of technologies for promoting clean, reliable and efficient power generation, both centrally and distributed, including the production of energy from renewable sources and the integration of these resources into the grid. It addresses the reduction of GHG emissions and toxic pollutants from the production of energy from fossil fuels, including through the development of clean coal and carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, and it provides support for Canada’s participation in the treaty of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) to develop advanced nuclear based energy systems. The CEPG distributed more than $117 million (Canadian) of NRCan funding for the period from 2003-04 to 2008-09. The total estimated CEPG funding from all sources for this period was $250.5 million.
Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF) (Vermont) Public Benefits Fund State/Territory NOTE: The Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund has issued its Five Year Strategic Plan. See the web site for details.

Vermont's Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF) was established in 2005 to promote the development and deployment of cost-effective and environmentally sustainable electric power and thermal energy resources -- primarily renewable energy, combined heat and power (CHP), thermal, and geothermal energy.

From its establishment to 2012, the CEDF has been supported via annual payments from Entergy (which owns the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant). In return, under terms of two memoranda of understanding between Entergy and the Vermont Department of Public Service (DPS) that expire in March 2012, Entergy is permitted to store its own spent nuclear fuel at the Vermont Yankee. Historically, the CEDF received approximately $7 million from Entergy annually. However, in 2010 the fund received only $4.5 million from Entergy and approximately $3.9 million in 2011 through the end of the fund (March 2012). Balances in the CEDF are carried forward and may not be used for general obligations of Vermont's government. In addition, the Vermont Recovery and Reinvestment Act mandated that all funding received from the State Energy Program (SEP) and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program from the Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 be included in CEDF (approximately $31 million in total). Legislation enacted in 2012 authorized $3 million in appropriations from the Vermont general fund to the CEDF as long as the general fund is in the black. That transfer should take place after May 1, 2013.

The CEDF is authorized to support renewable-energy resources, and CHP systems. Eligible renewable-energy systems include photovoltaics; solar-thermal; wind; geothermal heat pumps; farm, landfill and sewer methane recovery; low-emission, advanced biomass; and CHP systems using biomass fuels such as wood, agricultural or food wastes, energy crops and organic refuse-derived waste. (Municipal solid waste is not eligible.) CHP systems must have a design system efficiency of at least 65% and must meet Vermont's air-quality standards in order to qualify. H.B. 781 (June, 2010) authorized the CEDF to support natural gas vehicles and/or fueling infrastructure as well, although no programs have been developed to do so.

The CEDF may be used to support projects that sell power in commercial quantities (especially those projects that sell electricity to Vermont utilities), projects to benefit publicly owned or leased buildings, renewable-energy projects on farms, small-scale renewable energy for homes and businesses, and "effective projects that are not likely to be established in the absence of funding." Super-efficient buildings were included until 2009. The CEDF has provided funding for the Vermont Solar and Small Wind Incentive Program, the CEDF Loan Program, the Business Solar Energy Tax Credits (since expired), the Grant in Lieu of Business Solar Energy Tax Credits (special provision, 2011 only) and the CEDF Grant Program.

The DPS, which originally managed the CEDF, issued a strategic plan for the fund in May 2007. Legislation in 2009 created the Clean Energy Development Board to manage the fund. Legislation in 2011 mandated that the DPS take back administration of the fund, but that Clean Energy Development Board maintans decision-making and approval powers for plans, budgets, and overall program designs and serve in an advisory role on the fund's administration.

The CEDF's 2011 Annual Report is a comprehensive review of the fund's history as well as 2011 activity.
Clean Energy Investment Program (Florida) Bond Program State/Province The Florida Opportunity Fund's Clean Energy Investment Program is a direct investment program created to promote the adoption of energy efficient and renewable energy (EE/RE) products and technologies in Florida. The Fund will increase the availability of capital in Florida through both loan and equity investment instruments, and is designed to help Florida businesses and promote the adoption of commercialized clean energy technology. Fund investments must comport to the State Energy Program statute which requires that funds be used primarily for: (1) facility and equipment improvement with EE/RE products; (2) acquisition or demonstration of renewable energy products; and (3) improvement of existing production, manufacturing, assembly or distribution processes to reduce consumption or increase the efficient use of energy in such processes. The Office of Energy is working with the Grantee – Florida Opportunity Fund (staffed by Enterprise Florida) – and their contracted investment manager Florida First Partners to administer the program.
Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program (Virginia) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory In April 2011, Virginia created the Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program. The program is meant to replace the Solar Photovoltaic Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program and the Biofuels Production Incentive Grant Program, which will be phased out by 2013 and 2017, respectively. Money is appropriated to the fund at the discretion of the General Assembly.


"Clean energy manufacturer" is defined as a biofuel producer, a manufacturer of renewable energy or nuclear equipment/products, or "products used for energy conservation, storage, or grid efficiency purposes." Renewable energy is defined in the statutes (§ 56-576) to include solar, wind, hydro, biomass, waste energy, municipal solid waste, wave, tidal, and geothermal. It may also include thermal or electric energy from biomass co-firing facilities. Public service corporations are not eligible for the grants.


A clean energy manufacturer can receive a grant for up to six years if it:


  • Begins or expands its operations in Virginia on or after July 1, 2011
  • Makes a capital investment of more than $50 million in Virginia on or after July 1, 2011
  • Creates 200 or more new full-time jobs on or after July 1, 2011
  • Enters a memorandum of understanding setting forth the requirements for capital investment and the creation of new full-time jobs

The governor may reduce the capital investment and full-time job minimums if the manufacturer is located in an area with an unemployment rate of 1.25 times the statewide average unemployment rate of the previous year. For wind manufacturers, the capital investment minimum is $10 million and the job minimum is 30.


Full guidelines for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program can be found here.


The state will begin awarding grants on July 1, 2012.
Clean Energy On-Bill Financing (Connecticut) State Loan Program State/Territory By April 1, 2014, the Energy Conservation Management Board and the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) must consult with electric distribution companies and gas companies to develop a residential clean energy on-bill repayment program. The program will be financed by third-party, private capital and managed by CEFIA. The program will prioritize projects by cost-effectiveness, and the repayment term of any project cannot exceed the expected life of the improvements. Monthly payments cannot exceed the amount of the customer's bill before the project was installed. Residential customers of any electric distribution company or gas company will be eligible for the program.
Clean Energy Portfolio Goal Renewables Portfolio Standard State/Territory In May 2011, Indiana enacted SB 251, creating the Clean Energy Portfolio Standard (CPS). The program sets a voluntary goal of 10% clean energy by 2025, based on the amount of electricity supplied by the utility in 2010. The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted emergency rules (RM #11-05) for the CPS in December 2011. Final rules were adopted in June 2012, effective July 9, 2012.

Utility Participation

In order to participate in the program, electric utilities must apply directly to the IURC no later than 2 years after the beginning of Goal Periods I or II, as outlined below. Only public utilities may participate in the program; municipally-owned utilities, rural electric cooperatives, or electric cooperatives with at least one rural electric cooperative member may not participate in the program. Applications must include a plan to meet the goals, including a detailed business plan and the identification of specific projects and resources.

  • Goal Period I: Between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2018, an average of at least 4% of electricity supplied must be from clean energy
  • Goal Period II: Between January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2024, an average of at least 7% of electricity supplied must be from clean energy
  • Goal Period III: Between January 1, 2025 and December 31, 2025, an average of at least 10% of electricity supplied must be from clean energy

Utilities that participate in the program and meet the program goals are eligible for incentives which are used to pay for the compliance projects. A utility may apply to the commission to increase its Return on Equity by as much as 50 basis points over its current rate of return, or request a periodic rate adjustment mechanism. Applications to receive incentives must be filed no later than 6 months after the end of each Goal Period.

Program reports from each utility are due annually on March 1 beginning in 2014. Reports must include a detailed explanation and supporting documentation of any requests for rate adjustments for cost recovery associated with the CPS program.

Eligible Resources Clean energy technologies include wind; solar energy; photovoltaic cells and panels; dedicated crops grown for energy production; organic waste biomass, including agricultural crops, agricultural wastes and residues, wood residues, forest thinnings, mill residue wood, animal wastes, animal byproducts, aquatic plants and algae; hydropower; fuel cells; hydrogen; energy from waste to energy facilities, including energy derived from advanced solid waste conversion technologies; energy storage systems or technologies; geothermal energy; coal bed methane; industrial byproduct technologies that use fuel or energy that is a byproduct of an industrial process; waste heat recovery from capturing and reusing the waste heat in industrial processes for heating or for generating mechanical or electrical work; and demand side management or energy efficiency initiatives.

Up to 30% of the goal may be met with clean coal technology; nuclear energy; combined heat and power systems; natural gas that displaces electricity from coal; clean coal technology; and net-metered distributed generation facilities. Fifty percent of qualifying energy obtained by Indiana utilities participating in the CPS must come from within the state. Thermal energy used for heating, cooling, or mechanical work is eligible for the goal. In order to measure thermal energy for the purpose of goal compliance, it may be measured directly through a meter, calculated using an equation set forth in IAC 17.1, or a utility may seek approval from the commission to use an alternative equation.

Utilities may purchase, sell, or trade Clean Energy Credits, which are defined as 1 MW of clean energy (as defined above) or 3,412,000 BTUs. Any excess amounts of clean energy supplied during a specific goal period, or any Clean Energy Credits purchased from another supplier, may be counted toward the next goal period. Other than this exception, all clean energy sources must be in service, purchased, or contracted for by the effective dates of the CPS program goals.
Clean Energy Procurement (Maryland) Green Power Purchasing State/Territory Maryland's Governor issued an executive order on March 13, 2001 calling for at least 6% of the electricity consumed by state-owned facilities to be generated from "green" energy sources, such as wind, solar, landfill gas, and other biomass resources. The order specifies that no more than 50% of the power procured to meet the requirement come from municipal solid waste facilities.

Subsequently in 2009 the state embarked upon an initiative with the University System of Maryland, termed "Clean Energy Horizons", to contract for renewable energy through long-term power purchase agreements with clean energy developers. In December 2009 the Maryland Department of General Services (DGS) approved four contracts (see press release) that are anticipated to eventually supply up to 20% of the electricity needs of state agencies and the university system. The long-term agreements include both electricity and renewable energy credits (RECs), with a stipulation that the facilities come on-line by the end of 2014. The state reportedly intends to allow county, university and municipal partners access to the contracts to make their own renewable electricity purchases. The DGS has also installed renewable energy systems at several state buildings and in October 2011 issued an RFP (see press release) for up to 10 MW of electricity from animal waste energy facilities (e.g., poultry litter, livestock manure).

In another area, the order calls for a reduction in energy use in state buildings of 10% by 2005 and 15% by 2010, and requires all new energy-using products to carry the "Energy Star" label or "be in the top 25% of energy-efficiency when labeled products are unavailable." The Executive Order also makes it easier for the State to purchase alternative-fuel and low-emission vehicles for its fleet.
Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) (Maryland) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass resources include anaerobic digestion, landfill gas, wastewater-treatment gas, and cellulosic material derived from forest-related resources (excluding old-growth timber and mill residues consisting of sawdust or wood shavings)*, from waste pallets and crates, or from agricultural sources. The list of eligible resources is generally the same as those eligible for the federal renewable electricity production tax credit (PTC), except the Maryland law contains added provisions related to biomass and biogas technologies.


The tax credit has been in place since 2000, but has been amended several times since the initial enactment. The most recent substantive amendments were made in May 2010 by H.B. 494 (effective July 1, 2010), which extended the facility in service deadline from 2010 to 2015; set a minimum tax credit limit of $1,000; and made excess tax credits refundable. In May 2011, the definition of eligible waste materials was amended slightly by S.B. 958 to remove language requiring that such materials be "solid" and "cellulosic".


To qualify, a facility that "primarily uses" eligible resources to generate electricity must (1) be placed in service on or after January 1, 2006, but before January 1, 2016, or (2) generate electricity from an eligible resource that is co-fired with coal and initially begins co-firing an eligible resource on or after January 1, 2006, but before January 1, 2016, regardless of when the original facility was placed in service.

An individual or corporation that applies for and receives certification from the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) may claim a credit equal to 0.85 cents per kilowatt-hour ($0.0085/kWh) against the state income tax, for a five-year period, for electricity generated by eligible resources. The credit for electricity generated by co-firing is 0.5 cents per kilowatt-hour ($0.005/kWh). As a result of H.B. 494, effective July 1, 2010 the MEA is no longer permitted to issue initial credit certificates for amounts of less than $1,000. At the general renewable energy credit rate of $0.0085/kWh, a facility would need to produce 23,530 kWh annually to meet this minimum. The electricity generated must be sold to an unrelated person during the taxable year. The MEA indicates that a net metering or interconnection agreement is sufficient documentation for this requirement.

Certificates issued by the Maryland Energy Administration will state the maximum amount of credit over a five-year period; the earliest tax year for which the credit may be claimed; and the five-year period during which qualifying electricity generation qualifies for the tax credit. The maximum amount of credit is based on estimated annual energy production during a five-year period, or $2.5 million. The sum of all credits statewide may not exceed $25 million. Formerly, credits exceeding a taxpayer's state income tax for a taxable year could be carried forward to succeeding taxable years for up to 10 years. However, as a result of H.B. 494, credits in excess of income tax for a taxable year are now refundable.

Applications for credit certificates will be approved on a first-come, first-served basis. Certificates may not be issued after December 31, 2015. If, over a three-year period, a taxpayer does not claim on average at least 10% of the maximum credit amount stated in the certificate, the Maryland Energy Administration may cancel part of the certificate. Through March 2010 initial credit certificates totaling roughly $5.1 million had been issued to 10 qualifying facilities. Certificates for three landfill gas facilities and one commercial wind facility made up the vast majority of approvals, with the balance coming from several small scale wind and solar facilities. Further information on certificate applications and other program rules is available from the program website link at the top of this page.


* Eligible mill residues include bark, chips, slabs, and edging, although slabs and edging are usually made into chips.
Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal) (Maryland) Personal Tax Credit State/Territory Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass resources include anaerobic digestion, landfill gas, wastewater-treatment gas, and non-hazardous segregated waste material derived from forest-related resources (excluding old-growth timber and mill residues consisting of sawdust or wood shavings)*, from waste pallets and crates, or from agricultural sources. The list of eligible resources is generally the same as those eligible for the federal renewable electricity production tax credit (PTC), except the Maryland law contains added provisions related to biomass and biogas technologies.


The tax credit has been in place since 2000, but has been amended several times since the initial enactment. The most recent substantive amendments were made in May 2010 by H.B. 494 (effective July 1, 2010), which extended the facility in service deadline from 2010 to 2015; set a minimum tax credit limit of $1,000; and made excess tax credits refundable. In May 2011, the definition of eligible waste materials was amended slightly by S.B. 958 to remove language requiring that such materials be "solid" and "cellulosic".


To qualify, a facility that "primarily uses" eligible resources to generate electricity must (1) be placed in service on or after January 1, 2006, but before January 1, 2016, or (2) generate electricity from an eligible resource that is co-fired with coal and initially begins co-firing an eligible resource on or after January 1, 2006, but before January 1, 2016, regardless of when the original facility was placed in service.

An individual or corporation that applies for and receives certification from the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) may claim a credit equal to 0.85 cents per kilowatt-hour ($0.0085/kWh) against the state income tax, for a five-year period, for electricity generated by eligible resources. The credit for electricity generated by co-firing is 0.5 cents per kilowatt-hour ($0.005/kWh). As a result of H.B. 494, effective July 1, 2010 the MEA is no longer permitted to issue initial credit certificates for amounts of less than $1,000. At the general renewable energy credit rate of $0.0085/kWh, a facility would need to produce 23,530 kWh annually to meet this minimum. The electricity generated must be sold to an unrelated person during the taxable year. The MEA indicates that a net metering or interconnection agreement is sufficient documentation for this requirement.

Certificates issued by the Maryland Energy Administration will state the maximum amount of credit over a five-year period; the earliest tax year for which the credit may be claimed; and the five-year period during which qualifying electricity generation qualifies for the tax credit. The maximum amount of credit is based on estimated annual energy production during a five-year period, or $2.5 million. The sum of all credits statewide may not exceed $25 million. Formerly, credits exceeding a taxpayer's state income tax for a taxable year could be carried forward to succeeding taxable years for up to 10 years. However, as a result of H.B. 494 credits in excess of income tax for a taxable year are now refundable.

Applications for credit certificates will be approved on a first-come, first-served basis. Certificates may not be issued after December 31, 2015. If, over a three-year period, a taxpayer does not claim on average at least 10% of the maximum credit amount stated in the certificate, the Maryland Energy Administration may cancel part of the certificate. Through March 2010 initial credit certificates totaling roughly $5.1 million had been issued to 10 qualifying facilities. Certificates for three landfill gas facilities and one commercial wind facility made up the vast majority of approvals, with the balance coming from several small scale wind and solar facilities. Further information on certificate applications and other program rules is available from the program website link at the top of this page.


* Eligible mill residues include bark, chips, slabs, and edging, although slabs and edging are usually made into chips.
Clean Energy Resource Teams (Minnesota) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTs) are community-based groups stemming from a state, university, and nonprofit partnership to encourage community energy planning and clean energy project development. CERTs are tasked with developing and implementing community-based energy programs, and are meant to give citizens a voice in the implementation process and provide a broad-based resource and communications network that links local, county, and regional energy efficiency and renewable energy project efforts around the state. There are seven CERT regions, covering the entire state.
Clean Energy Tax Credit (Corporate) (Georgia) Corporate Tax Credit State/Territory
NOTE: Due to a high level of interest, the Clean Energy Tax Credit annual funding of $5 million for years 2012, 2013 and 2014 has been fully allocated to compensate applicants wait listed from previous years. The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority is continuing to accept and process applications. If denied by the Georgia Department of Revenue, these applications will be added to a waiting list, prioritized by postmark, for possible credit allocation in a future year.

In May 2008, Georgia enacted legislation establishing personal and corporate tax credits for renewable energy equipment and certain energy-efficient equipment installed and placed into service. For renewable energy property used for any purpose other than single-family residential purposes, the tax credit is equal to 35% of the cost of the system (including installation), $0.60/square foot for lighting retrofit projects, and $1.80/square foot for energy-efficient products installed during construction. The credit is subject to various ceilings depending on the type of system or project. The maximum credit amount is the lesser of 35% of the system cost or the maximum dollar cap specified for the technology. The following credit limits for various technologies apply:

  • A maximum of $100,000 per installation for domestic solar water heating
  • A maximum of $500,000 per installation for photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal electric applications, active space heating, biomass equipment and wind energy systems
  • A maximum of $100,000 per installation for Energy Star-certified geothermal heat pumps
  • A maximum of $100,000 for lighting retrofit projects
  • A maximum of $100,000 for energy-efficient products installed during construction.

Leased systems are eligible for the credit. (In the case of a leased system, the cost is considered to be eight times the net annual rental rate, which is the annual rental rate paid by the taxpayer less any annual rental rate received by the taxpayer from sub-rentals.)

Before claiming the credit, the taxpayer must submit an application to the Georgia Department of Revenue for tentative approval, as the aggregate amount of tax credits -- both personal and corporate credits -- taken may not exceed $2,500,000 in any calendar year through December 31, 2011. The aggregate annual limit in 2012, 2013 and 2014 is $5 million. Tax credits are granted on a first-come, first-served basis and may not exceed the taxpayer's liability for that taxable year. Taxpayers who do not receive a full credit for an eligible system will be placed on a "priority list" for access to this credit in future years.

The credit must be taken for the taxable year in which the property is installed. For credits allowed through the end of 2011, any excess credit may be carried forward for five years from the close of the taxable year in which the clean energy property was installed. Credits allowed for 2012, 2013 or 2014 must be taken in four equal installments over four successive taxable years beginning with the taxable year in which the credit is allowed.

Solar hot water systems must be certified for performance by the Solar Rating Certification Corporation (SRCC), the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) or a comparable entity approved by the tax authority. The equipment must meet the certification standards of SRCC OG-100 or FSEC-GO-80 for solar thermal collectors and/or SRCC OG-300 or FSEC-GP-5-80 for solar thermal residential systems.

This tax credit took effect July 1, 2008, and is scheduled to expire December 31, 2014.

Clean Energy Tax Credit (Maryland) Personal Tax Incentives State/Province The Clean Energy Tax Credit is 0.85 cents for each kilowatt hour of electricity sold that was produced from a Maryland qualified energy resource during the 5-year period specified in the initial credit certification. The annual tax credit may not exceed one-fifth of the maximum amount of credit stated in the initial credit certificate.

The business must produce electricity during the tax year using primarily "qualified energy resources" (see Internal Revenue Code Section 45) which includes any solid, non-hazardous, cellulosic waste material that is segregated from other waste materials and is derived from the following:

• Forest-related resources, including mill residues (except sawdust and wood shavings), forest thinnings, slash, or brush, but excluding old-growth timber.

• Waste pallets, crates, dunnage, landscape or right-of-way trimmings.

• Agricultural sources (orchard tree crops, vineyard, grain, legumes, sugar, and other crop by-products or residues).

"Qualified energy resources" also includes methane gas or other combustible gases resulting from the decomposition of organic materials from an agricultural operation or from a landfill or a wastewater treatment plant using either anaerobic or thermal decomposition, or a combination of both, and solar, geothermal or hydropower energy sources.
Clean Energy Technology Device Manufacturers' Credits (Delaware) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province Qualified manufacturers can apply for a tax break equal to 75% of the corporation income tax. The incentive is an increase from the Investment and Employment Credit Against Corporation Income Tax, raising the multiplier of the credit for the number of employees from $500 to $750. The business must have made an investment of at least $200,000 in the past 12 months, and must employ at least five people.
Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) (Federal) Federal Loan Program Federal Note: The IRS is not currently accepting applications for New CREB bond volume. The deadline for New CREB applications from electric cooperatives under IRS Announcement 2010-54 expired November 1, 2010. Bond volume for other eligible sectors (government entities and public power providers) was fully allocated in October 2009.

Readers should also note that the terms "New" and "Old" CREBs are used in the following summary to distinguish between prior CREB allocations and the New CREB authorizations made by the U.S. Congress in 2008 and 2009. The use of the term "New CREBs" has legal significance in that New CREBs authorized under 26 USC § 54A and 54C have substantially different rules than prior CREB allocations authorized under 26 USC § 54.

Clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) may be used by certain entities -- primarily in the public sector -- to finance renewable energy projects. The list of qualifying technologies is generally the same as that used for the federal renewable energy production tax credit (PTC). CREBs may be issued by electric cooperatives, government entities (states, cities, counties, territories, Indian tribal governments or any political subdivision thereof), and by certain lenders. The bondholder receives federal tax credits in lieu of a portion of the traditional bond interest, resulting in a lower effective interest rate for the borrower.* The issuer remains responsible for repaying the principal on the bond.

The Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (Div. A, Sec. 107) allocated $800 million for new Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs). In February 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Div. B, Sec. 1111) allocated an additional $1.6 billion for New CREBs, for a total New CREB allocation of $2.4 billion. The Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 also extended the deadline for previously reserved allocations ("Old CREBs") until December 31, 2009, and addressed several provisions in the existing law that previously limited the usefulness of the program for some projects. A separate section of the law extended CREBs eligibility to marine energy and hydrokinetic power projects.

Participation in the program is limited by the volume of bonds allocated by Congress for the program. Participants must first apply to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for a CREBs allocation, and then issue the bonds within a specified time period. The New CREBs allocation totaling $2.4 billion does not have a defined expiration date under the law; however, the recent IRS solicitations for new applications require the bonds to be issued within 3 years after the applicant receives notification of an approved allocation (see History section below for information on previous allocations). Public power providers, governmental bodies, and electric cooperatives are each reserved an equal share (33.3%) of the New CREBs allocation. The tax credit rate is set daily by the U.S. Treasury Department. Under past allocations, the credit could be taken quarterly on a dollar-for-dollar basis to offset the tax liability of the bondholder. However, under the new CREBs allocation, the credit has been reduced to 70% of what it would have been otherwise. Other important changes are described in IRS Notice 2009-33.

CREBs differ from traditional tax-exempt bonds in that the tax credits issued through CREBs are treated as taxable income for the bondholder. The tax credit may be taken each year the bondholder has a tax liability as long as the credit amount does not exceed the limits established by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. Treasury rates for prior CREB allocations, or "Old" CREBs are available here, while rates for New CREBs and other qualified tax credit bonds are available here.

In April 2009, the IRS issued Notice 2009-33, which solicited applications for the New CREB allocation and provided interim guidance on certain program rules and changes from prior CREB allocations. The expiration date for New CREB applications under this solicitation was August 4, 2009. Further guidance on CREBs is available in IRS Notices 2006-7 and 2007-26 to the extent that the program rules were not modified by 2008 and 2009 legislation. In October 2009, the Department of Treasury announced the allocation of $2.2 billion in new CREBs for 805 projects across the country. A new solicitation (IRS Announcement 2010-54) was issued in September 2010 for roughly $191 million in unallocated New CREB bond volume available only to electric cooperatives. The award announcement for this allocation was made in March 2011. It remains to be seen if or when the IRS will issue new funding announcements for Old CREB allocations which were not issued by the December 31, 2009 deadline, or New CREB allocations which miss the three-year issuance period.

History
The federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) established Clean Energy Renewable Bonds (CREBs) as a financing mechanism for public sector renewable energy projects. This legislation originally allocated $800 million of tax credit bonds to be issued between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2007. Following the enactment of the federal Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006, the IRS made an additional $400 million in CREBs financing available for 2008 through Notice 2007-26.

In November 2006, the IRS announced that the original $800 million allocation had been reserved for a total of 610 projects. The additional $400 million (plus surrendered volume from the previous allocation) was allocated to 312 projects in February 2008. Of the $1.2 billion total of tax-credit bond volume cap allocated to fund renewable-energy projects, state and local government borrowers were limited to $750 million of the volume cap, with the rest reserved for qualified municipal or cooperative electric companies.

For further information on CREBs, contact Zoran Stojanovic or Timothy Jones of the IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel at (202) 622-3980. Questions on recent IRS Notice 2009-33 can be directed to Janae Lemley at (636) 255-1202.


  • In March 2010 Congress enacted H.R. 2847 (Sec. 301) permitting New CREB issuers to make an irrevocable election to receive a direct payment -- a refundable tax credit -- from the Department of Treasury equivalent to and in lieu of the amount of the non-refundable tax credit which would otherwise be provided to the bondholder. This option only applies to New CREBs issued after the March 18, 2010 enactment of the law. In April 2010 the IRS issued Notice 2010-35 providing guidance on the direct payment option.
Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program (Tennessee) Grant Program State/Province The purpose of the Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program is to select and fund projects that best result in a reduction of emissions and pollutants identified below. The Clean Tennessee Energy Program provides financial assistance to municipal government, county government, utility districts, and other entities created by statute (e.g. airport authority) in Tennessee to purchase, install, and construct energy projects that fit into one of the following eligible project categories: Cleaner Alternative Energy, Energy Conservation, Air Quality Improvement.
Clean Water Legacy Act (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province This Act provides authority, direction, and resources to achieve and maintain water quality standards for groundwater and surface waters by implementing the federal Clean Water Act as well as applicable state and federal regulations. The Council aims to identify and categorize impaired waters, to offer incentives to prevent water impairment, and to support effective measures to clean up waters. The Council sets pollutant total maximum daily load (TMDL) standards for the waters of the State.
Clean Water Partnership Law (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province The main purpose of the Clean Water Partnership Law is to provide financial and technical assistance to local governments for the protection, enhancement, and restoration of surface waters. However, this law also provides a legal basis for state implementation of federal laws controlling nonpoint sources of water pollution, such as pollution from runoff or transportation.
Clean and Green Property Tax Incentives (Montana) Property Tax Incentive State/Province In 2007, the Montana Legislature passed House Bill 3 (May special session) that established property tax incentives to encourage energy projects with less environmental impact than conventional facilities. The “Clean and Green” incentives come in three forms.

First, certain facilities and equipment can be classified as either Class 14 or Class 15 Property (15-6-157 and 15-6-158, MCA). These classes are taxed at 3 percent of market value; previously, these facilities may have been taxed at a higher percent of their market value. To qualify for the 3% tax rate, the standard prevailing wages for heavy construction must be paid during construction and some other qualifications may also apply.

Second, high-voltage direct-current converter stations that are constructed in a location and manner so that the station can direct power to two different regional power grids can be classified as Class 16 property. Class 16 property is taxed at 2.25 percent of market value.

Third, a subset of Class 14, 15, and 16 properties are eligible for a property tax abatement of 50 percent for up to 19 years (15-24-3101 et seq. MCA). This abatement applies to all mills levied against the qualifying facility or equipment. For qualifying clean advanced coal research and development equipment or for renewable energy research and development equipment, only the first $1 million of the value receives the abatement.

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality must certify that certain transmission lines, carbon dioxide pipelines and liquid fuel pipelines qualify as Class 14 or 15 property. The Department also certifies any facility or equipment seeking the property tax abatement. A taxpayer starts the process by filling out the appropriate application. Projects eligible for these property tax classifications and abatements are likely to have unique characteristics, so a follow-up interview or inspection may be necessary.
Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) State Rebate Program State/Territory The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program offers a flat grant award of $500 for stick burning wood stoves and $700 for pellet burning wood stoves that meet program eligibility requirements.

Basic requirements for grant funding include:

  • The property must serve as primary residence
  • Clean burning wood stove must replace existing electric or non-natural gas fossil fuel heating system
  • A property may not receive more than one grant per technology per fiscal year from MEA
  • The MEA cannot offer grants to a property held in a trust
  • Applications have to be submitted to MEA within 12 months of installation*

Grants are allocated on a first come/first served basis across technologies, and are subject to change in amount and existence based on funding availability.

* A full list of program details and requirements can be found on the program web site listed above.
Climate Action Plan (Alabama) Climate Policies State/Province Currently, the State of Alabama does not have a climate plan in place or in progress. In December of 1997, Alabama completed a climate action plan jointly funded by the EPA to determine ways for the state to reduce greenhouse gases. The plan includes energy efficiency improvements, land management strategies, and cleaner transportation, but it does not include any methods of directly capturing emissions or pricing carbon.
Climate Action Plan (Arkansas) Climate Policies State/Province With the signing of Act 696 of the Arkansas 86th General Assembly (HB2460), Governor Mike Beebe established the Governor’s Commission on Global Warming. By design the Commission represents a wide diversity of views and perspectives with members coming from business, industry, environmental groups, and academia. The Governor appoints seventeen of the twenty-one members of the Commission and two members each are appointed by the President Pro Tempore of the Arkansas State Senate and by the Speaker of the Arkansas House of Representatives. The Commission was charged with setting a “global warming pollution reduction goal” for Arkansas and a “comprehensive strategic plan for implementation of the global warming pollution reduction goal.” The Act sets several study and evaluation requirements and required a final report to be provided to the Governor by November 1, 2008. The final report of the GCGW offered findings to the Eighty-Seventh General Assembly on which state action can be based.
Climate Action Plan (Connecticut) Climate Policies State/Province Connecticut’s climate change initiative is led and directed by the Governor’s Steering Committee on Climate Change (GSC). The GSC is made up of leaders from key state agencies including the Departments of Environmental Protection, Public Utility Control, Transportation, and Administrative Services, the Office of Policy and Management, and the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund.
Climate Action Plan (Delaware) Climate Policies State/Province To better understand the current and future vulnerabilities and risks to climate change, DNREC Secretary Collin O’Mara directed the Division of Energy and Climate to conduct a statewide climate change vulnerability and risk assessment.

The Delaware Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment reflects the best available climate science, climate modeling, and projections to illustrate the range of potential vulnerabilities that Delaware may face from the impacts of climate change. The Assessment will provide a strong scientific foundation for the development of the state’s adaptation planning and strategy.

The Delaware Climate Change Steering Committee was created to oversee the Assessment process. The Steering Committee’s membership includes some of Delaware’s leading scientists and practitioners. Their charge is to ensure the Assessment adheres to the highest levels of scientific integrity and that the information presented is applicable for future work in the state. Members represent the fields of agriculture, ecosystems and wildlife, climate, public health, water resources, and infrastructure.

In 2000, the Delaware Climate Change Action Plan (DCCAP) was prepared with funding from the Delaware State Energy Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s State and Local Climate Change Program. The Center for Energy and Environmental Policy of the University of Delaware researched and wrote the Action Plan with the guidance and advice of the Delaware Climate Change Consortium (DCCC), comprised of representatives from government, business, labor, environment and community-based organizations. In this Action Plan, the DCCC has developed a set of policy options that can reduce Delaware’s greenhouse gas emissions by 7% below the 1990 level. This amounts to a decrease of almost 25% in State emissions by 2010.

Three levels of implementation were devised: a Full Implementation scenario involving the adoption of all measures (i.e. 100%); a Major Commitment scenario which seeks to realize 65% of the reductions identified in the DCCAP through aggressive state policies and supporting federal strategies; and a Modest Commitment scenario with 35% of the DCCAP’s reductions targeted for state action and supporting federal initiatives. A detailed emissions reduction policy strategy is included in the DCCAP and is based on detailed analyses of a wide range of policy measures applicable to each sector of energy use. To ensure applicability to Delaware, the final selection of options was determined on the basis of cost-effectiveness. Implementation of the Action Plan will require adoption of a policy agenda that encourages the state’s government, industries, and citizen organizations to participate actively in a wide range of implementation activities. Such cooperation would involve legislative initiatives, community input and support, and education and outreach.
Climate Action Plan (District of Columbia) Climate Policies State/Province To lead by example, and to capitalize on the many benefits of energy efficiency and climate protection, the District Government is committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 20% (below 2006 levels) by 2012, 30% by 2020, and 80% by 2050.
Climate Action Plan (Florida) Climate Policies State/Province On July 12 and 13, 2007, Governor Charlie Crist hosted “Serve to Preserve: A Florida Summit on Global Climate Change.” The summit brought together leaders of business, government, science and advocacy to examine the risks of global climate change to Florida, and the nation, and to explore the business opportunities that can come from an aggressive response to climate change. At the conclusion of the summit, Governor Crist signed three Executive Orders and two international partnership agreements, adding Florida to the states actively working to address global climate change.
Climate Action Plan (Georgia) Climate Policies State/Province Currently, the State of Georgia does not have a climate plan in place or in progress.  Some efficiency actions have been taken.
Climate Action Plan (Illinois) Climate Policies State/Province In 2006 Governor Blagojevich announced a new global warming initiative that will build on Illinois’ role as a national leader in protecting the environment and public health. The announcement marked the beginning of a long-term strategy by the state to combat global climate change, and builds on the steps the state has already taken to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, such as enhancing the use of wind power, biofuels and energy efficiency. The Climate Change Advisory group issued a series of recommended strategies in 2007.
Climate Action Plan (Indiana) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Indiana does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Kansas) Climate Policies State/Province On March 21, 2008, Governor Kathleen Sebelius issued Executive Order No. 08-03 establishing the Kansas Energy and Environmental Planning Advisory Group (KEEP). The group’s purpose was to identify opportunities for Kansas to respond to the challenge of global climate change, while becoming more energy efficient and energy independent and spurring economic growth. The Advisory Group's task was to 1) Review and approve a current inventory and forecast of GHG sources and emissions from 1990 through 2025.

2) Develop and recommend short-, medium-, and long-term goals for statewide reductions in the amount of GHGs emitted by activities in Kansas. And,

3) Develop and recommend comprehensive climate mitigation policies in all economic sectors in Kansas through 2025 to meet or exceed state emission reduction goals.
Climate Action Plan (Kentucky) Climate Policies State/Province The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while becoming more energy efficient, more energy independent, create jobs and spur economic growth. Recognizing the interconnectedness of energy, environment and economic development, in June of 2009 Governor Steven L. Beshear created the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet (EEC). Three departments within the EEC — Department for Environmental Protection, Department for Natural Resources and Department for Energy Development and Independence — are participating in the Kentucky Climate Action planning process.
Climate Action Plan (Louisiana) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Louisiana currently does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Maine) Climate Policies State/Province In June 2003, the Maine State Legislature passed a bill charging the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) with developing an action plan with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from state sources. DEP initiated a stakeholder process, seeking input and building consensus on how best to meet the required emissions reductions. DEP submitted a Climate Action Plan for Maine 2004 to the Legislature in December 2004.
Climate Action Plan (Manitoba, Canada) Climate Policies State/Province Manitoba's Climate Action Plan centers around energy efficiency, although it includes mandates and initiatives for renewable sources of energy.

The province has a goal of installing 1000 MWs of wind energy in the next 10 years. Geothermal heat resources are already being used, and will be further developed. The province has a biofuels mandate and tax incentives for biodiesel plants and ethanol standards for fuel.

The province enacted legislation, the Climate Change and Emissions Reduction Act, that requires the province to meet the Kyoto targets.
Climate Action Plan (Maryland) Climate Policies State/Province On April 20, 2007, Governor Martin O’Malley signed Executive Order 01.01.2007.07 establishing the Maryland Climate Change Commission (MCCC) charged with collectively developing an action plan to address the causes of climate change, prepare for the likely consequences and impacts of climate change to Maryland, and establish firm benchmarks and timetables for implementing the Commission’s recommendations.

The Commission included members representing academia, business, industry, environmental groups and many levels of government. It was staffed jointly by the Maryland Department of the Environment and Department of Natural Resources in coordination with other state agencies.

One of the Plan’s policy recommendations, to adopt science-based regulatory goals to reduce Maryland’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, was realized with the passage of the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act of 2009 (GGRA). The law requires Maryland to reduce its GHG emissions to 25 percent below 2006 levels by 2020. It directs the Maryland Department of the Environment to work with other lead State agencies to prepare an implementation plan to meet this goal as a first step toward achieving longer term science-based reductions. An interim plan will be submitted to the Governor and the General Assembly during the 2012 legislative session, and the final plan (GGRA Plan) will be submitted on or before December 31, 2012.
Climate Action Plan (Massachusetts) Climate Policies State/Province In August 2008, Governor Deval Patrick signed into law the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA), making Massachusetts one of the first states in the nation to move forward with a comprehensive regulatory program to address climate change.

The GWSA requires the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEEA), in consultation with other state agencies and the public, to set economy-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction goals for Massachusetts that will achieve reductions of between 10 percent and 25 percent below statewide 1990 GHG emission levels by 2020, and 80 percent below statewide 1990 GHG emission levels by 2050. It is in this context that EOEEA presents the Massachusetts Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2020. Secretary Bowles has set that 2020 limit at 25 percent — and the Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2020

contains the measures necessary to meet the limit.
Climate Action Plan (Michigan) Climate Policies State/Province On November 14, 2007, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm issued Executive Order No. 2007-42 establishing the Michigan Climate Action Council (MCAC). The Council is comprised of members representing academia, a broad base of industry, utilities, state and local government, and environmental interest groups. The Council will act in an advisory capacity to:

1) Produce an inventory and forecast of greenhouse gas sources and emissions from 1990-2020; 2) Consider potential state and multi-state actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change in various sectors including energy supply, energy efficiency and conservation, industrial process and waste management, transportation and land use, and agriculture and forestry; 3) Develop a comprehensive climate action plan with specific recommendations for reducing greenhouse gases in Michigan by business, government and the general public, and 4) Advise state and local government on measures to address climate change.

The Council is being supported by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, which is the lead state agency for this effort and by the Center for Climate Strategies (CCS) a nonprofit service organization that has substantial experience working directly with public officials and their stakeholders to facilitate the development of climate action plans.

In addition to the Council, there will be five technical work groups that will have further input into the process by reviewing technical documents, developing and reviewing proposed policy actions and recommendations and providing feedback on priorities.
Climate Action Plan (Minnesota) Climate Policies State/Province Recognizing the implications that global climate change may have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Minnesota, Governor Tim Pawlenty signed into law the 2007 Next Generation Energy Act. The law builds on Minnesota’s nation-leading energy policies of more renewable energy, more energy savings, and lower carbon emissions, and specifies the development of a comprehensive plan to reduce Minnesota’s emissions of greenhouse gases.

The Center for Climate Strategies (CCS) was asked to help facilitate and provide technical support to a new Minnesota Climate Change Advisory Group (MCCAG) that would prepare a Climate Mitigation Action Plan for presentation to the governor and the legislature in February, 2008.

CCS worked closely with the Minnesota Department of Commerce and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to create and manage the MCCAG, which began meeting in April 2007. This 56-member group, representing a vast range of public-/private-sector organizations and citizen interests, is using a stakeholder-based consensus building process to develop set of state-level policy recommendations for reducing or sequestering greenhouse gas emissions. The MCCAG will also identify opportunities to promote energy-efficient technologies and clean, renewable energy resources that will enhance economic growth.
Climate Action Plan (Mississippi) Climate Policies State/Province Currently, the State of Mississippi does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Missouri) Climate Policies State/Province Currently, the State of Missouri does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress. Several municipalities and universities have climate action plans in place.
Climate Action Plan (Montana) Climate Policies State/Province Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Montana, the Climate Change Advisory Committee (CCAC) was established with the aim of formulating recommendations for specific actions for reducing or sequestering greenhouse gas emissions. The Committee also identified opportunities to promote energy efficient technologies and clean, renewable energy resources that will enhance economic growth. The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) managed the CCAC, which was made up of 18 members representing a broad range of stakeholders including industry, environmental groups, local and tribal governments, transportation, and agriculture. The Center for Climate Strategies provided facilitation and technical support to the DEQ and the CCAC.
Climate Action Plan (Nebraska) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Nebraska does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (New Brunswick, Canada) Climate Policies State/Province This Climate Change Action Plan 2014–2020 builds and establishes 2020 and 2050 provincial GHG emissions reduction targets of 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and 75 to 85 percent below 2001 levels by 2050. It is a long-term strategy achieved through key incremental actions, many described in the plan, while other actions will evolve during the next six years.

The plan includes actions in the following areas: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency; Transportation; Waste Reduction and Diversion; Industrial Sources; Government Leading by Example; Adaptation; and Partnerships and Communication.

The plan includes studies of the feasibility of constructing new small-scale hydroelectricity generation projects, the assessment and development of a range of renewable energy generation opportunities, such as biomass, solar, wind and tidal, and the implementation of a forest biomass policy.
Climate Action Plan (New Hampshire) Climate Policies State/Province 29 members of Governor John Lynch’s Climate Change Policy Task Force developed a Climate Action Plan in 2009. It is aimed at achieving the greatest feasible reductions in greenhouse gas emissions while also providing the greatest possible long-term economic benefits to the

citizens of New Hampshire.

New Hampshire’s Climate Action Plan presents an opportunity to: • Spur economic growth through investment in our state’s economy of monies currently spent on energy imports. • Create jobs and economic growth through development of in-state sources of energy from renewable and low emitting resources, and green technology development and deployment by New Hampshire businesses. • Avoid the significant costs of responding to a changing climate to the state’s infrastructure, economy, and the health of our citizens. • Preserve the unique quality of life that makes New Hampshire an outstanding place to live, work, and raise a family.

The Task Force recommends that New Hampshire strive to achieve a long-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, consistent with the New England Governors – Eastern Canadian Premiers resolutions and the consensus recommendations of the scientific community.

To move toward this long-term goal and provide the greatest economic opportunity to the state of New Hampshire, the Task Force recommended 67 actions to: • Reduce emissions from buildings, electric generation, and transportation. • Protect our natural resources to maintain the amount of carbon sequestered. • Support regional and national initiatives to reduce greenhouse gases. • Develop an integrated education, outreach and workforce training program.

• Adapt to existing and potential climate change impacts.
Climate Action Plan (New Jersey) Climate Policies State/Province The NJDEP Office of Sustainability and Green Energy coordinates programs that reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, as well as programs designed to help New Jersey become resilient to climate impacts and adapt to those impacts that are unavoidable.
Climate Action Plan (New Mexico) Climate Policies State/Province Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in the Southwest, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson signed Executive Order 05-033 on June 5th, 2005, establishing the New Mexico Climate Change Action Council and the New Mexico Climate Change Advisory Group (CCAG). The Climate Change Action Group reviewed and provided recommendations to the Governor’s office regarding climate change policy. The Council was chaired by the Secretary of the Environment and will had representatives from the Departments of Agriculture; Economic Development; Energy, Mining, and Natural Resources; General Services; Health; Indian Affairs; and Transportation. The State Engineer, Director of Game and Fish, and the Governor’s Advisor on Energy and Environment also served on the Council. Drawing on its own expertise and the perspectives of the CCAG members, the Advisory Group found meaningful solutions that fit New Mexico’s unique needs and circumstances.
Climate Action Plan (New Orleans) Climate Policies State/Province New Orleans' Climate Action Plan will provide a road map to reach the City's greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goal by 2030 while orchestrating its adaptation to climate change. The CAP will outline how the region will mitigate the effects of sea level rise and global warming through a variety of complementary structural and non-structural measures. The Energy Department is collaborating with local non-profits to secure funding for this effort.

Citywide Programs: - Retrofitting of 200 City Buildings - will increase energy efficiency by 20% and save $1.8 million/year.

- Conversion of street lights to high-pressure sodium (amber) and metal halide (white). Plan to experiment with super fluorescents (white and more energy efficient).

- Evaluating light emitting diodes (LEDs) for traffic signals. Note: LED's and higher efficiency streetlights save both energy and maintenance costs.

- Computerization of lights on playgrounds to save energy use when playgrounds not in use. Emissions inventory and analysis being conducted by OEA.

- Development of volunteer speakers' bureau to increase curbside recycling participation.

- Canal Streetcar Project underway; Desire Streetcar Project being studied
Climate Action Plan (New York) Climate Policies State/Province In August of 2009 Governor David A. Paterson signed Executive Order No. 24 setting a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in New York State by 80 percent below the levels emitted in 1990 by the year 2050. The Executive Order also created the New York Climate Action Council (CAC) with a directive to prepare a draft Climate Action Plan by September 30, 2010. The Climate Action Plan will assess how all economic sectors can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adapt to climate change. The Plan will also identify the extent to which such actions support New York’s goals for a clean energy economy. The CAC will draw on several advisory panels including an Integration Advisory Panel (IAP) made up of New Yorkers who will provide advice and assist the CAC in evaluating the best methods to achieve the Governor's GHG reduction goals and prepare New York communities and natural resources for the impacts of climate change. CAC representatives and IAP members will participate in Technical Work Groups (TWGs) representing the key sectors of the states' economy. Four technical work groups will focus on "mitigation" -- ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A fifth TWG will address "adaptation" -- measures that will safeguard public health, the environment, and infrastructure from expected climatic changes. The work of the TWGs will inform the decision making of the CAC and the New York Climate Action Plan. In addition, the 2050 Visioning Advisory Panel will offer guidance and long-term perspective to the CAC, TWGs, and IAP on key design options available to achieve the Executive Order’s goal of a low-carbon, climate-change-resilient New York State by year 2050.
Climate Action Plan (North Carolina) Climate Policies State/Province The North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources (DENR) has established a priority in the 2009 - 2013 Strategic Plan to respond to climate change using both mitigation and adaptation strategies to reduce vulnerability, increase adaptive capacity and improve resiliency of climate-sensitive resources. DENR’s Climate Change Steering Committee provides oversight for implementation of DENR’s Climate Change Initiative. This team is developing a focused approach to address climate change policy actions at state, regional and federal levels, while coordinating strategies with other state, federal and nongovernmental partners.
Climate Action Plan (North Dakota) Climate Policies State/Province The State of North Dakota does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada) Climate Policies State/Province Nova Scotia's Climate Change Action Plan has two main goals: reducing the province's contribution to climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and preparing for changes to the province's climate that are already inevitable.

REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS Target: 5 Megatonnes Annually By 2020 Nova Scotia aims to reduce GHG emissions by at least 10 per cent from 1990 levels by 2020.

Electricity generation The greatest single reduction will be achieved by imposing caps on emissions from Nova Scotia Power Incorporated (NSPI), which produces 46 percent of the province's GHG emissions. The caps will take effect in 2010, 2015, and 2020.

The two most cost-effective means of reducing emissions from power generation in Nova Scotia are straightforward: generating less electricity and generating it from clean, renewable sources.
Climate Action Plan (Ohio) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Ohio does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Oklahoma) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Oklahoma does not currently have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Ontario, Canada) Climate Policies State/Province Climate Ready, Ontario's Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan, outlines the problems, goals, and key strategies for the province's approach to climate change and the problems it poses. The Plan includes five goals:

1. Avoid loss and unsustainable investment, and take advantage of economic opportunities. 2. Take reasonable and practical measures to increase climate resilience of ecosystems. 3. Create and share risk-management tools to support adaptation efforts across the province. 4. Achieve a better understanding of future climate change impacts across the province. 5. Seek opportunities to collaborate with others.

One main area of focus for the first goal is energy infrastructure. The infrastructure policy includes the development of clean energy sources that diversify the province's energy supply.
Climate Action Plan (Pennsylvania) Climate Policies State/Province The Office of Pollution Prevention and Energy Assistance works with citizen's groups, businesses, trade organizations, local governments and communities to help them reduce pollution and save energy. In addition, the office works to foster and develop alternative energy solutions. Part of that effort includes encouraging the deployment and use of innovative environmental and advanced energy technologies, including renewable energy.
Climate Action Plan (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Climate Policies State/Province Prince Edward Island's Climate Action Plan has four main goals:

- Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate the effects of global warming - Enhancing carbon sinks to reduce the harmful build-up of CO in the atmosphere - Improving PEI's communities' ability to adapt to climate change - Increase public awareness

The plan addresses PEI's energy strategy to add 500 MW of new wind power by 2013, as well as the planned increase in biomass energy and support for small-scale geothermal (heat) and solar projects.
Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island) Climate Policies State/Province In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in response to growing international agreement that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are warming the planet at a rapid rate. Reducing greenhouse gases can help reduce global warming — a major concern for Rhode Islanders because of its potential adverse impacts such as flooding in coastal areas, saltwater contamination of drinking water, extreme weather events, and damage to local crops. In July 2002, GHG stakeholders completed Phase 1 of the project with the publication of the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Action Plan. The Action Plan outlines programs and policies the state could undertake to meet its commitment under the New England Governors' and Eastern Canadian Provincial Premiers' (NEG/ECPP) Climate Change Action Plan, August 2001. The NEG/ECPP agreement aims to reduce annual greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2010, to at least 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, and up to 85 percent below 1990 levels over the long term.
Climate Action Plan (South Carolina) Climate Policies State/Province Governor Sanford issued Executive Order 2007-04 on February 16, 2007, establishing the South Carolina Climate, Energy and Commerce Advisory Committee (CECAC).

The Committee was made up of members representing a broad range of stakeholders including: industry, environmental groups, government agencies, academic institutions, agriculture, forestry, coastal interests, real estate, tourism, banking, insurance and other sectors. The non-profit Center for Climate Strategies (www.climatestrategies.us) will provide facilitation and technical support.

The current members of CECAC are listed at this address: http://www.fws.gov/southeast/climate/policy/ClimateSCClimateActionPlan082008.pdf
Climate Action Plan (South Dakota) Climate Policies State/Province The State of South Dakota currently does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Tennessee) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Tennessee currently does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Texas) Climate Policies State/Province The State of Texas currently does not have a climate plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Vermont) Climate Policies State/Province There is a growing scientific consensus that increasing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are affecting the temperature and variability of the Earth’s climate. Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Vermont, Governor Jim Douglas issued Executive Order 07-05 establishing the Governor's Commission on Climate Change (GCCC) and asked it to:

Examine the real and potential effects of climate change on Vermont, including, but not limited to the impact of climate change on public health, natural resources and the economy; Produce an inventory of existing and planned actions that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions in Vermont; Educate the public about climate change and develop educational tools that will help Vermonters understand how they, as individuals, can play a role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions; Request input from representatives of the business, environmental, forestry, transportation, non-profit, higher education, municipal and other sectors regarding opportunities to reduce emissions and conserve energy; and

Develop recommendations to the Governor to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Vermont, consistent with Vermont’s need for continued economic growth and energy security.
Climate Action Plan (Virginia) Climate Policies State/Province Governor Timothy M. Kaine established the Governor's Commission on Climate Change in December 2007. The commission prepared a plan for Virginia that identified ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. During the development of the plan, the commission took the following steps:

Inventoried the amount of and contributors to Virginia’s greenhouse gas emissions, including emissions projections through 2025

Inventory and projection of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (2000 – 2025) - added 12.19.2008 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (1990 - 1999) - added 12.19.2008

GHG inventory - final draft

Evaluated the expected impacts of climate change on Virginia’s citizens, natural resources and economy

Identify climate change approaches being pursued by other states, regions and the federal government

Identified what Virginia needs to do to prepare for the likely consequences of climate change Identified any actions (beyond those identified in the Virginia Energy Plan) that need to be taken to achieve the 30 percent greenhouse gas reduction goal

The Virginia Energy Plan, released in September 2007, set a goal for the Commonwealth to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2025. The reduction in emissions will be partially achieved through energy conservation and renewable energy actions listed in the energy plan.
Climate Action Plan (West Virginia) Climate Policies State/Province The State of West Virginia currently does not have a climate action plan in place or in progress.
Climate Action Plan (Wisconsin) Climate Policies State/Province In April 2007, Governor Doyle signed Executive Order 191 which brought together a prominent and diverse group of key Wisconsin business, industry, government, energy and environmental leaders to create a Task Force on Global Warming. The Task Force proposed measures to reduce a variety of the state's greenhouse gas emissions. In July 2008, the Task Force voted overwhelmingly to approve the final report and recommendations, Wisconsin's Strategy for Reducing Global Warming, and forwarded the document on to Governor Doyle for consideration. WICCI formed in 2007 and is a partnership between the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the University of Wisconsin–Madison's Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. The goal of WICCI is to assess and anticipate climate change impacts on Wisconsin's natural resources, ecosystems, regions and industries (including agriculture, tourism and other human activities) and develop and recommend adaptation strategies that can be implemented by businesses, farmers, public health officials, municipalities, wildlife managers and other stakeholders.
Climate Protection and Green Economy Act, Global Warming Solutions Act (Massachusetts) Climate Policies State/Province This Act requires the Department of Natural Resources to monitor and regulate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to require emissions reporting and to establish a regional greenhouse gas registry. Emissions reporting is required from generation sources producing electricity that is consumed in the Commonwealth, as well as from all retail sellers of electricity.
CoServ - Solar Energy Rebate (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility CoServ Electric Cooperative provides a rebate to its members who installation a solar energy system on their property. Customers must sign an interconnection agreement (with net metering) for on-site generation with CoServ. Any excess generation from the system will be given to CoServ without compensation.


Interested customers are encouraged to contact the utility for more details before making investment decisions.
Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and water right holders for damage to land and to water quality and availability that is attributable to the development of coal bed methane wells. The Act aims to provide for the responsible development of coal bed methane resources while mitigating adverse environmental impacts. However, the provisions of this Act do not relieve coal bed methane developers or operators of their legal obligation to compensate landowners and water right holders for damages caused by the exploration for development of coal bed methane. The Coal Bed Methane Protection Program is administered by local Conservation Districts in the state.
Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by-products in the State. This legislation restricts the siting of new refuse disposal systems accepting coal combustion by-products in critical natural resource areas (defined in Natural Resources Article, 8-1802, Annotated Code of Maryland).
Coal Conversion Facility Privilege Tax Exemptions (North Dakota) Property Tax Incentive State/Province Coal Conversion Facility Privilege Tax Exemptions are granted under a variety of conditions through the North Dakota Tax Department. Privilege tax, which is in lieu of property taxes on the facility, is imposed monthly on a coal conversion facility. The land on which the plant is located remains subject to property tax. A new or repowered electrical generation facility is exempt from the state’s share of both taxes for the first five years of operation, and the county where the plant is located may exempt all or part of its share of the tax based on capacity for up to five years.
Coal Development (Nebraska) Siting and Permitting State/Province This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.
Coal Mine Safety Act (Virginia) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This Act is the primary legislation pertaining to coal mine safety in Virginia. It contains information on safety rules, safety standards and required certifications for mine workers, prohibited acts in mines, mine inspections, rescue crews, incident procedures, fees, and worker training programs. Additional requirements, specific to underground and surface coal mines, are found in the next two sections.
Coal Mining (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land conservation and reclamation procedures following mining. All applications for coal mining operations must address the probable on- and off-site hydrologic consequences of the mining and reclamation operations.
Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Reclamation Division of the Public Service Commission is tasked with administering the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation. Specific regulations can be found in article 69-05.2 of the ND Administrative Code.
Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province Kentucky Administrative Regulation Title 405 chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18 and 20 establish the laws governing coal mining in the state. The Department of Natural Resources under the authority of the Energy and Environment Cabinet is responsible for enforcing these laws and assuring compliance with the 1977 Federal Surface Mining Control Act (SMCRA). The Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement is responsible for inspecting all surface and underground coal mining permits in the state. The Division of Mine permits is responsible for issuing all permits related to coal mining. The Division of Abandoned Mine Lands is responsible for ensuring that all mines are properly closed down and will not pose a threat to the public once they are closed. All certifications and mining specialties, as established by the Kentucky Mining Board, must be signed by the Director (KOMSL) verifying the holder has completed the requirements for certification. All coal miners must be drug tested prior to being issued any new certification. New miners must have 24 hours of training and pass a written exam before being eligible for employment at a surface mine. Workers at prep plants, rail sidings, and river terminals must also meet those training requirements. The inexperienced miner must work a minimum of 45 days at a surface mine before becoming a certified experienced miner. After the initial training, each surface mine employee is required to receive eight hours of retraining annually. To obtain a Surface Mine Foreman Certification, a miner must have three years of surface mining experience achieved after age 18. To obtain certification, a surface mine foreman must specialize in either coal extraction or post mining activities (coal preparation or coal handling). The applicant must have at least one year of practical experience in the specialty category. To become a blaster in a surface coal mine, the applicant must attend 30 hours of training and pass both a licensing and certification test. Two years of additional work experience under a licensed blaster is required. The federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) established authority for the AML Fund. Production fees of $0.325 per ton for surface-mined coal and $0.125 per ton for underground-mined coal are collected from coal producers at all active coal mining operations.
Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations aim to ensure that any coal mining or extraction will be conducted in a manner that will not significantly damage the environment or area of land affected. The Department of Environmental Protection has the authority to grant licenses for coal mining, to protect public health and environment quality, and oversee all reclamation procedures. Any proposed exploration or mining for coal requires a license, and these regulations describe application procedures, powers of the Commissioner of the Department in the event of an emergency, and the authority to call a special investigating commission, and rules pertaining to water quality. Applications for a license must include an environmental impact report, a comprehensive reclamation plan, and public hearings and announcements.
Coal Mining Tax Credit (Arkansas) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Coal Mining Tax Credit provides an income or insurance premium tax credit of $2.00 per ton of coal mined, produced or extracted on each ton of coal mined in Arkansas in a tax year. An additional credit of $3.00 per ton will be allowed for each ton of coal mined in Arkansas in excess of 50,000 tons in a tax year. The credit can only be earned if the coal is sold to an electric generation plant for less than $40 per ton excluding freight charges. Any unused credits may be carried forward for the next 5 succeeding tax years or until exhausted, whichever occurs first.
Coal Severance Tax (Montana) Fees State/Province The Coal Severance Tax replaces and streamlines previous coal taxes to:

(a) allow the severance taxes on coal production to remain a constant percentage of the price of coal; (b) stabilize the flow of tax revenue from coal mines to local governments through the property taxation system; (c) simplify the structure of coal taxation in Montana, reducing tax overlap and improving the predictability of tax projections; (d) recognize the economic, transportation, and environmental advantages of electrical generation by modern electrical generation plants near coal mines; and (e) accomplish the purposes of this subsection by establishing categories of taxation that recognize the unique character of coal, as well as the variations found within the coal industry, and by encouraging the use of coal to produce electricity in modern generating plants near the coal mine.

Persons producing less than 50,000 tons of coal in a year are exempt from the severance tax. Persons producing in excess of 50,000 tons per year are exempt from the severance tax on the first 20,000 tons produced. The first 2 million tons of coal produced as "feed stock" for a coal enhancement facility is exempt.

Funds from the Coal Severance Tax are placed into a tax trust bond fund, which is used as a reserve fund to guarantee repayment of state bonds for renewable resource projects if the normal funding source is unavailable.
Coal Severance Tax (North Dakota) Fees State/Province The Coal Severance Tax is imposed on all coal severed for sale or industrial purposes, except coal used for heating buildings in the state, coal used by the state or any political subdivision of the state, and coal used in agricultural processing and sugar beet refining plants in the state or adjacent states. The tax is in lieu of sales and use taxes on the coal and property tax on minerals in the earth. Coal is taxed at a flat rate of 37.5 cents per ton. An additional 2-cent per ton tax is levied for the Lignite Research Fund. A 50% reduction in the 37.5-cent tax is allowed for coal burned in a cogeneration facility designed to use renewable resources to generate 10% or more of its energy output. Counties may grant a partial or complete exemption from the counties’ 70% portion of the 37.5-cent tax for coal that is shipped out of state.
Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is authorized, as provided in this law, to establish a single unit to be served by one or more wells for a coal seam natural gas producing area. Without in any way modifying the authority granted to the commissioner to establish a drilling unit or units for a pool, the commissioner, upon the application of any interested party, may enter an order requiring the unit operation of any coal seam natural gas producing area when such unit operation will promote the development of such coal seam natural gas producing area, prevent waste, and avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells.
Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Siting and Permitting State/Province This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the review and permitting for the following types of activities when they are to occur within the Coastal Area: beach and dune construction projects, developments and subdivision of properties greater than five (5) acres in size, dredging and filling of state water bottoms and wetlands, the drilling and operation of groundwater wells with a capacity of 50 gpm or greater, the siting of energy facilities, and other various activities which may have an impact on coastal resources. Implementation of the ACAMP is shared by the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources-Coastal Section and the ADEM Coastal Section. ALDCNR-Coastal Section is responsible for planning activities while the ADEM Coastal Section is responsible for permitting, monitoring and enforcement activities, as detailed in the ADEM Division 8 Coastal Programs Rules (ADEM Admin. Code R 335-8).
Coastal Facilities Review Act (Maryland) Siting and Permitting State/Province This Act aims to preserve Maryland's coastal areas and to balance competing demands for resources by requiring environmental impact evaluations to be conducted prior to the approval of the construction or operation of certain facilities. Such review complements the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, which establishes a comprehensive plan for the proper use and development of energy resources in coastal areas. This Act applies to pipelines carrying crude oil or natural gas from offshore sources; facilities for the processing, transmission, or storage of natural gas with a total design capacity for at least one billion cubic feet of gas for storage or 200 million cubic feet for processing; operations bases and fabrication yards; and other facilities storing or processing petroleum resources. See subtitle 22.
Coastal Management (Louisiana) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Coastal Use Permit (CUP) process is part of the Louisiana Coastal Resources Program (LCRP), which is an effort among Louisiana citizens, as well as state, federal and local advisory and regulatory agencies to preserve, restore, and enhance Louisiana's valuable coastal resources. The purpose of the Coastal Use Permit process is to make certain that any activity affecting the Coastal Zone, such as a project that involves either dredging or filling, is performed in accordance with guidelines established in the LCRP. The guidelines are designed so that development in the Coastal Zone can be accomplished with the greatest benefit and the least amount of damage. Any project that may impact coastal waters through dredging, filling, water control structures, bulkheads, oil and gas facilities, marina, or residential development require a permit.
Coastal Management Act (Georgia) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to establish procedural requirements for the Department of Natural Resources to develop and implement a program for the sustainable development and protection of coastal resources. It establishes the Department of Natural Resources as the State agency to receive and disburse federal grant monies. It establishes the Governor as the approving authority of the program and as the person that must submit the program to the federal government for approval under the federal Coastal Zone Management Act. It requires other State agencies to cooperate with the Coastal Resources Division when exercising their activities within the coastal area.
Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and structures in marsh areas and requires permits for other activities and structures. Erecting structures, dredging, or filling marsh areas requires a Marsh Permit administered through the Coastal Management Program. In cases where the proposed activity involves construction on State-owned tidal water bottoms, a Revocable License issued by the Coastal Resources Division may also be required. Marsh Permits and Revocable Licenses are not issued for activities that are inconsistent with the Georgia Coastal Management Program.
Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Coastal Permit Program Rules provide the processes for permit reviews. They include details on what activities need permits; the qualifications for general permits or permits-by-rule; the details for pre-application meetings, contents and fees; review procedures and deadlines; permit appeals; and enforcement of the coastal laws and rules. The Coastal Zone Management Rules (CZM Rules) define Special Areas of environmental interest, details requirements for development projects and sets forth the compliance criteria for permit approval. Certain general permits require compliance of specific sections of the CZM Rule, for example “dunes” or “shellfish habitat.” Individual Permit applications must address and demonstrate compliance with each applicable component of the CZM rules for the specific site and regulated activity to be approved.
Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) Siting and Permitting State/Province The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to support and nurture all types of marine life and wildlife, shall be preserved. (b) Preference will be given to uses which the general public may enjoy and participate in over uses which are limited to fewer individuals. (c) The public interest in navigation in the intracoastal water shall be protected. (d) Unauthorized use of coastal public land shall be prevented. (e) Utilization and development of the surface of coastal public land is not allowed unless the public interest as expressed by this chapter is not significantly impaired by it. (f) Use of the surface estate in coastal public land shall not be granted except by leases and lesser interests and by exchanges of coastal public land for littoral property. (g) Vested rights in land shall be protected. The School Lands Board is responsible for implementing, administering, and enforcing these policies, and, in cooperation with the Texas Land Commissioner, will develop a comprehensive coastal land management program to carry out these duties. As part of this program, permits are required for the construction or modification of most structures on coastal public lands.
Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina) Environmental Regulations State/Province This legislation enacts a state management program to oversee water and land use and development in South Carolina's coastal zone. Under the program, the Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to enact regulations to protect coastal zones. Permits are required for many activities which may disrupt land or water in these areas, including dredging, the construction of pipelines, and other development.

The South Carolina Coastal Management Program was established under the guidelines of the national Coastal Zone Management Act (1972) as a state-federal partnership to comprehensively manage coastal resources. It was authorized in 1977 under SC’s Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands Act (CTWA) with the goal of achieving balance between the appropriate use, development, and conservation of coastal resources in the best interest of all citizens of the state.

DHEC's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (DHEC-OCRM) is the designated state coastal management agency and is responsible for the implementation of the state’s Coastal Management Program. Implementation includes the direct regulation of impacts to coastal resources within the critical areas of the state including coastal waters, tidelands, beaches and beach dune systems; and indirect certification authority over direct federal actions and federal and state permit decisions within the eight coastal counties.

The SC Coastal Management Program also includes the direct permitting of stormwater and land disturbances in the coastal zone in coordination with the state-wide stormwater permitting program.
Cobb EMC - Solar Rebate Program (Georgia) Utility Rebate Program Utility This program is no longer offered.


Beginning in February 2008, Cobb Energy Management Corporation (EMC) offers rebates for residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Cobb EMC is offering members $450 per kilowatt-AC (kW-AC) installed, up to a maximum of 10 kW. In order to receive the rebate, PV systems must be interconnected to the grid. A rebate of $450 per system is also offered to solar water heating systems installed.


For more information and application forms, see the program web site listed above.



Cobb EMC also offers a green power purchasing program called Green Power EMC. Customers can purchase 150 kWh/month blocks of green power for $5.00/month. The green power is produced using methane gas, hydro, and biomass.
Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Generating Facility Rate-Making
Interconnection
State/Province The Cogeneration Rules are enforced by the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are designed to ensure that all power producers looking to sell their power to residents of Arkansas are necessary, benefit the public and are environmentally friendly. Under these rules new facilities constructed to connect the generating facility to the transmission grid require the issuance of a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CCN) or a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need (CECPN). These certificates must be applied for and are issued by the Public Service Commission.
Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Michigan) Utility Rebate Program Utility The Coldwater Board of Public Utility, in conjunction with American Municipal Power's "Efficiency Smart" program, offers a wide range of incentives that encourage commercial and industrial to pursue energy efficient equipment and energy saving measures. Prescriptive rebates are available for efficient lighting, HVAC equipment, compressed air systems and accessories, motors, refrigeration equipment, and food service equipment. Efficiency Smart also provides a custom incentive program for energy saving projects which may not be covered by the prescriptive program. Program applications, which include rebate calculation worksheets, are available on the program web site. Consult the program's terms on the application and contact the Coldwater Board of Public Utility or the Efficiency Smart program with any questions.
Collateral Support Program (New Mexico) Loan Program State/Province The New Mexico Finance Authority has been approved to administer a $13.2 million Small Business Collateral Support Participation Program. The funds are dedicated to help finance credit worthy small businesses leverage private lending when they are unable to obtain the capital required to expand and create jobs.

Through the Collateral Support Participation program, the Finance Authority is able to partner directly with banks to provide capital to credit worthy businesses seeking to expand and create or retain jobs. Under this bank participation program, the Finance Authority is able to fund quickly and efficiently lower the interest rate paid by the business and mitigate the bank’s risk by purchasing a portion of the bank’s loan, often in a subordinated collateral position. The amount of the Finance Authority’s participation will vary based upon the location of the business, the term of the loan and the collateral position offered to the Finance Authority.

In order to qualify for Collateral Support Participation program funds, a small business must:

- Be located in New Mexico - Use the loan proceeds for business purposes - Be a non-profit corporation or a for-profit corporation, partnership, limited liability company or partnership, sole proprietorship, cooperative or other entity that is authorized to conduct business in the State of New Mexico - Have 500 or fewer employees

- Meet the bank’s lending requirements with the exception of the deficient collateral, which is enhanced through the program
Collection, Storage And Impounding Of Waters (Kansas) Property Tax Incentive State/Province Kansas Statute Chapter 82 Article 4 lays out property tax exemption requirements for landowners who build and maintain dams on their property in the state of Kansas. Dams must meet the given standards for design, approval, construction, maintenance and procedure in order for the land owner to be eligible for tax exemption.
Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard (Missouri) Renewables Portfolio Standard Local In November 2004, voters in Columbia, Missouri approved a proposal to adopt a local renewables portfolio standard (RPS).* The initiative requires the city's municipal utility, Columbia Water and Light, to generate or purchase electricity generated from eligible renewable-energy resources at the following levels:
  • 2% by December 31, 2007
  • 5% by December 31, 2012
  • 10% by December 31, 2017
  • 15% by December 31, 2022

Eligible renewable-energy resources outlined in the ordinance include solar energy (both electricity and heat), wind electricity, hydroelectricity, geothermal energy, and biomass sources, including landfill gas, paper based products, such as cardboard and newsprint, wood and wood wastes, cellulose based products that originate from trees or shrubbery; and other materials that come directly from trees or plants. Passive solar and geothermal heat pump energy systems are ineligible.

Columbia has also established a goal of meeting 1% of its RPS target using solar energy and is developing a new program, termed Solar One, to assist in achieving this goal. The Solar One program allows utility customers to voluntarily purchase 100 kilowatt-hour (kWh) blocks of solar energy for a small additional charge on their electricity bill. Solar power is generated by local facilities on city-owned properties and local businesses, currently totaling 10 kilowatts (kW). An additional 15 kW of solar capacity is expected to be added by Fall 2010, allowing the utility to enroll additional customers in the program.

Resources must meet the environmental criteria approved by the Columbia City Council, after review by the Columbia Environment and Energy Commission and the Columbia Water and Light Advisory Board. Electricity purchased from on-site renewable energy systems owned by Columbia Water and Light customers may be included to meet the standard. Resources must be close enough to Columbia that the power can be physically transmitted into the Water and Light system. In the future, however, the higher compliance requirements may force the utility to look at green tags (i.e. renewable energy credits) as an option. The Water and Light Department intends to pursue this avenue only as a last resort.

The standard will be met to the extent possible without increasing electric rates by more than 3% as a result of the standard. According to the 2013 Report shows the city reached 7.94% in 2012. The utility's current energy portfolio is largely based on wind and landfill gas resources, with a small amount from biomass/coal co-firing and solar.

By February 1 of each year, the Columbia Water and Light Department must issue a renewable-energy plan, detailing a proposal for how the city intends to comply with the RPS ordinance during the following year. The plan explains the city's due diligence in pursuing renewable-energy opportunities and detail all cost assumptions and related utility rate calculations, except with regard to confidential information that may be withheld pursuant to state law. It is then be reviewed by the Columbia Environment and Energy Commission and the Columbia Water and Light Advisory Board, and submitted to the Columbia City Council for approval following a public hearing.


* The RPS was approved by 78% of voters, with no organized opposition. The state renewable electricity standard adopted by ballot initiative in November 2008 does not apply to municipal utilities such as Columbia Water and Light.
Columbia Water & Light - Solar Rebates (Missouri) Utility Rebate Program Utility Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and residential customers for the purchase of solar water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems. These rebates are available for solar water heaters that were installed after April 2007, and for solar photovoltaic systems that were installed after June 2007. Following installation of any of these efficiency measures, applicable building or plumbing permits should be secured.

Columbia Water & Light electric customers are eligible for a $400 rebate for the purchase of a new solar water heater. To apply for this rebate, a customer submits a pre-approval application to Columbia Water & Light prior to installation and commits to maintaining the system for at least five years. The application can be found on the program website listed above. Customers with an existing natural gas water heater are eligible for an $800 rebate if they convert to a solar electric water heating system.

Customers are eligible for a $500 rebate for each kilowatt (kW) of solar photovoltaic installed. Pre-project approval is required in order for a system to be eligible for a rebate. Systems must be between 0.25 kW and 10 kW in size and must meet a variety of interconnection, net metering, and rebate requirements. All attributes associated with the production of energy from the system accrue to the CWL under the utility's net metering agreement. Federal tax credits are applicable on top of these incentives.
Combined Heat and Power Standard Offer Program (Ontario, Canada) Performance-Based Incentive Utility The Combined Heat and Power Standard Offer was developed by the Ontario Power Authority to

support the efficient use of gas-fired electricity generating facilities that utilize combined heat and power (CHP) technology. The fundamental objective of the CHPSOP Program is to facilitate the increased development of CHP Facilities that are up to a maximum capacity of 20 MW in size, connected to a Distribution System and in an area of the Province where such generation can effectively be accommodated.

Some typical examples of facilities suitable for the application of such CHP technologies include: greenhouses, institutional buildings (such as municipalities, universities, schools and hospitals) with high thermal energy demands, multi-unit residential buildings, industrial facilities and other district energy projects.

The program, in combination with the complimentary Energy Recovery Standard Offer Program that applies to biogas and biomass facilities, are initially limited to a total combined program capacity of 200 MW.

The program is currently on hold while the Authority determines the remaining capacity for the project.
Commercial & Industrial Renewable Energy Grants (New Hampshire) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: The deadline for the most-recent round of funding under this program, which offered a total of $1.8 million in grants, was '''''June 7, 2013. This summary is provided for reference only. Contact the PUC about the possibility of future funding rounds under this program.


The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) offers grant funding for renewable-energy projects installed at commercial, industrial, public, non-profit, municipal or school facilities, or multi-family residences with at least three units. There is no stated maximum individual award.


Eligible forms of energy include electricity or useful thermal energy generated from wind, ocean thermal, wave, current, tidal, hydrogen derived from biomass fuels or methane gas, methane gas, biomass, hydroelectric, and solar technologies. Electricity generated by geothermal facilities is also eligible. Projects must utilize grant funds primarily for capital investments in new renewable energy facilities, upgrades to existing facilities to increase renewable energy production, or upgrades to existing renewable energy facilities that will qualify them as a “renewable source” for the production of renewable energy certificates (RECs) under RSA 362-F. Systems financed by third parties are generally allowed.


Projects that are eligible to apply for a rebate under any of the PUC’s renewable-energy rebate programs, including the PUC’s commercial and industrial solar rebate program, are not eligible for funding under this round.
Commercial & Industrial Solar Rebate Program (New Hampshire) State Rebate Program State/Territory The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission initiated a new solar rebate program for non-residential applicants in November 2010. Funded by alternative compliance payments under the state's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), this program supports photovoltaic (PV) and solar-thermal installations. Installations must be located in the state of New Hampshire, and the facility must be served by an investor-owned utility or rural electric utility that is required to comply with the state's RPS. (Municipal Utilities are not required to comply with the state's RPS, and therefore their customers are not eligible for this program.) Systems owned by third-parties and sited on eligible customer premises are eligible.


Applicants must first reserve incentive funding. In addition, applicants must complete a "Level II" energy audit. Only qualifying systems installed on or after November 1, 2010, are eligible. This program will operate on a year-by-year basis or until funding is exhausted, whichever comes first.


See the program web site (listed above) for application materials, budget status and additional program details.
Commercial Clean Energy Grant Program (Maryland) State Rebate Program State/Territory The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) offeres grants for mid-sized photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar water heating systems (SWH) and Geothermal Heating & Cooling (GHC) installed by businesses, non-profits, and local governments. Funding is available on first-come, first-serve basis and is subject to change based on funding availability.


Program Description


The incentive amounts for each technology depends on the capacity of system. The program are classified into either Small or Large Commercial grants, with incentives amounts below


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Commercial Solar Hot Water Financing Program (Massachusetts) Other Incentive State/Territory The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and Paradigm Partners are offering a solar hot water financing program in order to meet MassCEC's objective of growing the commercial solar hot water industry in Massachusetts. Commercial and non-profit building owners can use the financing program to install solar hot water systems that heat water for the building's domestic, space or process heating needs. A variety of financing options will be available depending on the project, including power purchase agreements or energy service agreements. A third party will finance the construction, maintenance, and operating costs of the system, and the building owner will sign a long-term contract with the third-party owner. In order to be eligible for the program, the customer's utility must pay into the MassCEC Renewable Energy Trust Fund. Interested customers should use the contact below. Projects will be evaluated based on the suitability of the site, the commitment of the building owner, and the project's timeline relative to other proposed projects.
Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation (Illinois) Property Tax Incentive State/Territory Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure (tower plus generation equipment) as "real property", subject to taxation, while others deemed only the tower portion as taxable property. This difference in valuation procedure meant that the taxable value of identical wind turbines could vary by as much as 75% from county to county, creating dramatically different tax loads and complicating projects that cross county lines.

In October 2007 Illinois passed Public Act 095-0644, a law providing consistent valuation procedures for commercial wind farm equipment (amended via HB4797 in 2010). For ten years, beginning in the 2007 assessment year, wind energy devices larger than 500 kilowatts (kW) and producing power for commercial sale will be valued at $360,000/Megawatt (MW) of capacity, annually adjusted for inflation according to the U.S. Consumer Price Index. This figure is termed the trended real property cost basis. Because Illinois assesses property for property tax purposes at 1/3 of its fair cash value, in practice the assessed value of commercial wind energy property is $119,988/MW.

The law also defines an allowance for physical depreciation of the device, calculated by dividing the age of the turbine by 25 and then multiplying the result by the trended real property cost basis. The physical depreciation allowance may not exceed 70% of the trended real property cost basis, though additional depreciation allowances may be granted for functional or external obsolescence.
Commercial and Industrial Machinery Tax Exemption (Kansas) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province All commercial and industrial machinery and equipment acquired by qualified purchase or lease made or entered into after June 30, 2006 shall be exempt from property tax. All commercial and industrial machinery and equipment transported into this state after June 30, 2006 for the purpose of expanding an existing business or the creation of a new business shall be exempt from property tax.
Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island) State Grant Program State/Territory The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and alternative compliance payments (ACPs) from the state’s renewable portfolios standard (RPS). Currently, the RIEDC provides grants for small-scale solar projects and direct funding for commercial-scale renewable-energy projects.

Grants are available for electricity-generating renewable-energy systems greater than 10 kilowatts (kW) but not greater than 50 kW. Grants will provide 20% of project funding, with a maximum award of $75,000 per individual project. Systems may be installed on businesses, institutions, non-profits, municipality property and affordable housing projects. The deadlines to submit complete applications are March 15, 2013; May 31, 2013; and August 30, 2013.

The following requirements apply to solar-electric projects:

  • A shade-analysis demonstrating no more than 20% predicted shading during the hours of one hour after sunrise and one hour before sunset.
  • A layout drawing of project.
  • A one-line electrical drawing.
  • An interconnection application submitted to National Grid.
  • Project payback using assumptions stated in the program guidelines
  • Manufacturer’s specifications for panels and inverter to be installed.
  • A photo of the project location taken from the south looking northward toward the building or site.
  • An aerial image of the site from Microsoft Virtual Earth, Google Earth, or similar source with the building or site clearly identified.
Separate requirements apply to wind-energy projects. Funding is also available to support early-stage commercialization and pre-development feasibility studies for renewable-energy projects. See the program rules and regulations for more information.
Commercialization Support for Business Program (Manitoba, Canada) Grant Program State/Province The Commercialization Support for Business Program supports product and process commercialization and business development in all sectors and all regions of the province.

Commercialization Support for Business includes:

Concept Development (Max up to $25,000) – from concept to prototype development

Product Development (Max up to $40,000) – pre-commercialization activities like feasibility or engineering analyses, trial production and test marketing

Product Commercialization (Max up to $200,000) – moving from prototype to market-ready product.

Market Access Component (Max $15,000) – materials and activities needed to enter new markets successfully

Certification Assistance (Max $15,000) – obtaining plant or product certification

Intellectual Property (Max $25,000) – securing intellectual property rights for the product or process
Common Pipeline Carriers (North Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province Any entity that owns, operates, or manages a pipeline for the purpose of transporting crude petroleum, gas, coal, or carbon dioxide within or through the state of North Dakota, or is engaged in the business of producing, purchasing, or transporting natural gas, is subject to these regulations. The regulations address resource production and pipeline operation, and permitting requirements and the right of eminent domain as they apply to pipeline carriers. The Commission may choose to enact further regulations as necessary.
Commonwealth Hydropower Program (Massachusetts) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: This program reopened March 15, 2013. There is $1,200,000 available for Round 5; applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until funding is exhausted. See the program web site for application materials.

Through the Commonwealth Hydropower Initiative, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers grants for both feasibility studies and construction of hydroelectric facilities. Feasibility studies are capped the lesser of $40,000 or 80% of actual costs. Construction projects are capped at the lesser of $600,000, 50% of actual costs, or $1.00 per incremental kWh per year for projects that increase an existing system capacity. Hydropower facilities must have qualified (or be expected to qualify) for Massachusetts Renewable Portfolio Standard. MassCEC is the administrator of the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund, the state's clean energy fund.


Applicants must have and demonstrate site control (meaning that they have legal control of the project site, through executed agreement or selection to enter into an agreement). In addition, the project must demonstrate an additional 200,000 kilowatt hours/year (non-conduit feasibility grants) or 50,000 kWh/year (design and construction grants) increase in generation and have at least 20 years of useful life. Projects must have a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license or exemption, or a FERC order stating that the facility does not fall under FERC jurisdiction (not common), or the projects must be eligible for a conduit exemption. Projects that require new dams are not eligible.

Projects applying for feasibility funding must provide a 20% cost-share, while design and construction project applicants are responsible for at least 50% cost-share. It should be noted that applicants are encouraged to request less than the maximum allowed funding since cost effectiveness is considered in the application evaluations.

This is a competitive grant. All applications must meet minimum eligibility criteria and will be evaluated on the thoroughness of facility and project descriptions, compliance with dam safety regulations, satisfactory explanation of regulatory/licensing status, status with state renewable portfolio standard qualification and incremental energy production. Projects applying for Design and Construction grants will also be evaluated on economic analysis criteria, thoroughness of feasibility analysis, technical feasibility, efficiency and environmental benefits, development progress and time frame, risks identification and strategy for overcoming those, cost effectiveness, and potential benefits to state ratepayers. Awarded projects are required to meet project milestones, deliverables and reporting deadlines.

Projects must owned by commercial, industrial, institutional (including not-for-profit), or public entities served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric -- that contribute to the Renewable Energy Trust. In addition, customers of any Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Department that pays into the Renewable Energy Trust are also eligible (see MassCEC's website for additional information on which MLP's have joined the Renewable Energy Trust Fund).

Applications must be submitted according to MassCEC format guidelines, both hard copies and electronic copies are required. See the program web site for details and for a complete application package.
Commonwealth Organics-to-Energy Program (Massachusetts) State Grant Program State/Territory The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers a Commonwealth Organics-to-Energy grant program. Organics-to-Energy grants support the use of anaerobic digestion and other technologies that convert source-separated organic wastes into electricity and thermal energy.


Grants are available to electricity customers served by the following Massachusetts investor-owned electric utilities, which pay into the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund: Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), National Grid, NSTAR Electric and Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of certain municipal lighting plant (MLP) utilities are also eligible including Ashburnham, Holden, Holyoke, Russell, and Templeton.


There are three separate solicitations under this program. Each solicitation has specific eligibility and requirements, the information provided here is a summary only.


1. Technical Services/Technical Study Grants


Only public entities are eligible for the technical services grants. Up to $60,000 is available per grant and a 5% cost-share is required. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Specific eligible activities include:


  • Technical assistance in the development, evaluation and procurement of contracts through a Request for Qualifications/Request for Proposals process
  • Technical assistance for proposals to site organics-to energy facilities within a public entity's jurisdiction
  • Public engagement processes for matching community needs with organics processing options
  • Pre-feasibility studies for sites, generator clusters, or technical approaches to handling identified organic waste streams

2. Feasibility Studies


Both public and private (profit or not-for-profit) entities are eligible to apply. Activities supported include assessing feedstock, the technical and engineering feasibility of the project, interconnection requirements, identifying any community impacts or issues, among other activities. Up to $40,000 is available with a 5% cost share for public entities and 20% cost share for non-public entities.


3. Construction and Pilot Projects


Both public and private (profit or not-for-profit) entities are eligible to apply. Activities supported include designing, permitting, and construction as well as installation and/or commissioning of equipment. There are some key differences and eligibility requirements between "construction projects" and "pilot projects" and there are corresponding funding amounts available. Construction projects may be eligible for 25% of the total project costs, up to $400,000 and pilot projects may be eligible for 50% of the total project costs, up to $200,000.


MassCEC is accepting applications for all project types. Interested applicants must read full solicitations and are strongly encouraged to discuss projects with MassCEC staff prior to application submission.
Commonwealth Solar II Rebates (Massachusetts) State Rebate Program State/Territory

Block 20 opened on October 7, 2014 and is the final funding block of the Commonwealth Solar II Program. See program website for more information.


Commonwealth Solar II, offered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC), provides rebates for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems at residential, commercial, industrial, institutional and public facilities.* Commonwealth Solar II rebates are available to electricity customers served by the following Massachusetts investor-owned electric utilities: Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), National Grid, NSTAR Electric and Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of certain municipal lighting plant (MLP) utilities are now eligible including Ashburnham, Holden, Holyoke, Russell, and Templeton. Commercial projects are eligible for rebates for PV projects less than or equal to 15 kilowatts (kW) in capacity and the rebate will be based on the first 5 kW only. Funding is released in "blocks" every quarter. All rebate applications must be approved BEFORE the project installation begins.


Rebate amounts are based on the total PV system size per building, regardless of the number of electric meters in use and certain other characteristics of the project. The proposed Commonwealth Solar II rebate levels for residential and commercial PV systems are:

  • Base incentive: $0.25/watt
  • Adder for Massachusetts company components: $0.05/watt
  • Adder for moderate home value: $0.40/watt (applicable to residential projects only), or
  • Adder for moderate income: $0.40/watt (applicable to residential projects only)
  • Natural Disaster Relief Adder (see program manual for detailed eligibility requirements): $1.00/watt

The rebate is available to the system owner, which may or may not be the host customer. In the case where the system owner is a third-party owner serving a residential host customer, the project is treated as a commercial project (and eligible for the commercial rebate amounts only). Solar renewable-energy credits (SRECs) associated with system generation belong to the system owner and may be sold via the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) SREC program. Note: appropriate, approved tracking must be utilized in order to qualify to sell SRECs. MassCEC reserves the right to conduct post-installation inspections of PV projects prior to approval for payments.

System installers are responsible for the application process and securing necessary permits. MassCEC has developed an online application system (called PowerClerk) for pre-approved installers. Only online applications will be accepted. An energy-efficiency audit is generally required. Required documentation generally includes electric utility interconnection approval, an energy-efficiency audit, paid invoices or equivalent, and, if applicable, evidence that automated reporting is functional. It is recommended, but not required, that installers or their subcontractors obtain or seek to obtain North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) PV installer certification.

This summary does not capture all of the requirements of the Commonwealth Solar II program. The MassCEC provides program manuals as well as appendices with full program requirements and you must read those materials carefully.

The Commonwealth Solar II program summary report provides an ongoing tally of number of systems and kW installed in the state. The Commonwealth Solar II Program will end once funding for Block 20 is fully expended.

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program (Massachusetts) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: The Development Grant solicitation is currently closed for this year.


Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, and development grants and loans for commercial wind projects 2 MW or greater that will serve the whole-sale energy markets or for projects that do not qualify for net metering but provide on-site use. MassCEC is the administrator of the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust (RET), the state's clean energy fund.

Projects must owned by commercial, industrial, or institutional (including not-for-profit or public) entities served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of any Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Department that pays into the RET are eligible (see MassCEC's web site for additional information on which MLP's have joined the RET).


The site assessment grant is a grant of services. For public entities, there is no cost share. For non-public entities, the MassCEC requires a cost share of $1,500. The site assessment is intended to be the first step of many when planning a wind project. It is also required for additional MassCEC commercial wind grants. There is a specific framework determined for these services, with project timelines and responsibilities clearly defined. The entire site assessment process is designed to last 12 weeks.


The feasibility study grant analyzes all aspects of a project, including the technical, environmental, regulatory, and financial aspects. Public outreach and stakeholder engagement is required as part of the feasibility study. In addition, a detailed wind resource assessment is required and additional funding is available for that piece. Acoustic studies may qualify for additional funding and should follow MassCEC's Acoustic Methodology for Wind Projects. A public entity may apply for business planning grants, which take place after the feasibility study.


Finaly, development grants are now available for commercial wind projects. These grants may be used for activities such as permitting, evaluating environmental impacts, performing geotechnical or interconnection studies, and public outreach. Funding levels (with associated cost shares) are as follows:


  • Feasibility Study, Public Entity: $50,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share.
  • Feasibility Study, Non-Public Entity: $40,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share.
  • Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Public Entity: $20,000, with 5% cost share.
  • Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Non-Public Entity: $15,000 with 20% cost share.
  • Acoustic Study Grant, Public Entity: $15,000 maximum grant and no cost share.
  • Acoustic Study Grant, Non-Public Entity: $12,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share.
  • Business Planning Adder, Public Entity only: $15,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share.
  • Development Grant, Non-Public Entity only: $250,000 maximum grant with 40% cost share.
All applications must be submitted electronically. Interested applicants must review the full program documentation, solicitations and applications. This is only a brief overview.
Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative (Massachusetts) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: The Development Grant solicitation is currently closed for this year.


Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Community-Scale Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, design and construction grants, and development grants for community-scale wind projects greater than 100 kW that will serve a load at the project site (and typically net meter) or will serve load requirements of a host municipal light department. MassCEC is the administrator of the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust (RET), the state's clean energy fund.


Projects must owned by commercial, industrial, or institutional (including not-for-profit or public) entities served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of any Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Department that pays into the RET are eligible (see MassCEC's web site for additional information on which MLP's have joined the RET).


The site assessment grant is a grant of services. For public entities, there is no cost share. For non-public entities, the MassCEC requires a cost share of $1,500. The site assessment is intended to be the first step of many when planning a wind project. It is also required for additional MassCEC community-scale wind grants. There is a specific framework determined for these services, with project timelines and responsibilities clearly defined. The entire site assessment process is designed to last 12 weeks.


The feasibility study grant analyzes all aspects of a project, including the technical, environmental, regulatory, and financial aspects. Public outreach and stakeholder engagement is required as part of the feasibility study. In addition, a detailed wind resource assessment is required and additional funding is available for that piece. Acoustic studies may qualify for additional funding and should follow MassCEC's Acoustic Methodology for Wind Projects. A public entity may also apply for business planning grants, which take place after the feasibility study.


Finally, development grants are available for community-scale wind projects. These grants may be used for both development activities, such as permitting, environmental impact evaluation, technical studies, and public outreach, and construction activities, such as turbine procurement, construction, and commissioning. Funding levels (with associated cost shares) are as follows:


  • Feasibility Study, Public Entity: $50,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share.
  • Feasibility Study, Non-Public Entity: $40,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share.
  • Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Public Entity: $20,000, with 5% cost share.
  • Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Non-Public Entity: $15,000 with 20% cost share.
  • Acoustic Study Grant, Public Entity: $15,000 maximum grant and no cost share.
  • Acoustic Study Grant, Non-Public Entity: $12,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share.
  • Business Planning Adder, Public Entity only: $15,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share.
  • Development Grant, Public Entity: $400,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share.
  • Development Grant, Non-Public Entity: $260,000 maximum grant with 25% cost share.
All applications must be submitted electronically. Interested applicants must review the full program documentation, solicitations and applications. This is only a brief overview.
Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative (Massachusetts) State Rebate Program State/Territory Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and construction of customer-sited small wind public projects and rebates of up to $5.20/W with a maximum of $100,000 for non-public projects. The rebates are available for projects 1 to 99 kilowatts (kW) nameplate capacity. Projects must be located at residential, commercial, industrial or public institutional facilities ("host sites") served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, certain Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Departments have opted to pay into the Renewable Energy Trust and their customers are now eligible for rebates (see the information about MLPs here).

The rebate is available to the system owner, which may or may not be the host customer. The wind-system installer must provide "turnkey service and installation," which includes preparation and submission of the rebate application. The application must be pre-approved before the system is built. Applications must demonstrate that 50% or more of the electricity produced by the renewable-energy system to be funded by MassCEC will be used on-site or net metered, based on annual production and usage estimates. Installers are required to carry insurance, as outlined in the program guidelines. Projects may be multi-turbine projects (although only the first 99 kW will be eligible for the rebate). Projects must also meet minimum expected performance criteria of at least 10% capacity factor. As part of the application process, applicants use the Commonwealth Wind Evaluation and Siting Tool (CWEST) to determine the expected capacity factor of their project (as well as expected performance).

Massachusetts Micro Wind rebate is a hybrid rebate. It is part capacity-based and part expected performance-based. Ninety percent of the rebate is paid at the time of project goes online and 10% is paid after one year of reporting. The first part of the rebate (the "Installation Rebate") is based on the wind turbine's rated capacity at 11 m/s according to the calculation: Incentive = rated capacity (kW) * 460 + 3200.

The equation for the second rebate (the "Estimated Performance Rebate") is: Expected Production (as determined by CWEST, in kilowatt hours) * 2.8 * rated capacity (kW)^-0.29.

Applicants are required to install revenue quality meters on the systems to record the electrical production. Production must be reported monthly to the MassCEC Production Tracking System (PTS) for one year after installation. Projects 10 kW and above must install equipment capable of automated reporting to the PTS. The MassCEC will pay the remaining 10% of the incentive after receiving production information. MassCEC also uses this information to calculate performance bonus payments for systems that produce more than expected (bonus payments are not guaranteed and are subject to change).

It should be noted that projects that do not meet minimum performance eligibility requirement may be eligible for the "Production-Only Pilot Rebate." This will be available for up to five projects or 20 kW in total rated capacity. All other eligibility requirements must be met. The "Production-Only Pilot Rebate" incentive amount is calculated as:
Incentive = Production * (Installation Incentive + Estimated Performance Rebate using 10% capacity factor). It is available only after 12 months of actual electricity production.

The Micro Wind rebate is available on a first-come, first-served basis. The program retains 25% of the budget for small systems (projects 15 kW and below) during the first nine months of the fiscal year. For additional technical requirements and application materials, see the program website.
Commonwealth's Energy Leasing Program (Virginia) Leasing Program State/Territory Lease financing administered by the Department of Treasury provides funding for energy efficiency projects in state facilities operated by state agencies, authorities and institutions of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Energy Leasing Program allows for the purchase of services and equipment required to develop, design, and install an energy efficiency project. Agencies can finance energy projects at a minimum of $100,000 and will make repayments over 12 or 15 year terms.

The funds can be used to finance projects with relevant energy efficient technology, such as lighting and motor efficiency upgrades, building envelope enhancements, distribution system improvements, and energy management controls. It is the responsibility of the individual agency to ensure that energy projects are in accordance with§4-4.01(u) of the General Provisions of the Appropriations Act.


Visit the Commonwealth's Energy Leasing Program online for more information.
Commonwealth's Master Equipment Leasing Program (Virginia) Leasing Program State/Territory The Master Equipment Leasing Program (MELP) ensures that all Commonwealth agencies, authorities and institutions obtain consistent and competitive credit terms for financing equipment and energy efficiency projects. Agencies can finance energy projects at a minimum of $10,000 and can make repayments over 3, 5, 7 and 10 year terms.

Qualifying Energy Projects Energy efficiency projects may include personal property, the installation or modification of an installation in a building, professional management, and other special services which are primarily intended to reduce energy consumption and demand or allow the use of an alternative energy source. Personal property is defined as new or reconditioned tangible personal property that includes personal property to be affixed to realty and must be used for governmental purposes.

MELP financed energy projects with relevant energy efficient technology include lighting and motor efficiency upgrades, building envelope enhancements, distribution system improvements, energy management controls.

Visit the Commonwealth's Master Equipment Leasing Program online for more information.
Community Based Renewable Energy Production Incentive (Pilot Program) (Maine) Performance-Based Incentive State/Territory In June 2009, Maine established the Community-based Renewable Energy Pilot Program. As the name suggests, this program is intended to encourage the development of locally owned, in-state renewable energy resources.

The Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) finalized the rules in February 2010. Legislation mandates that up to 50 megawatts (MW) of generating capacity (DC) will be permitted under the program, and individual participants may not exceed 10 MW. Of the 50 MW cap, 10 MW must be reserved specifically for small program participants (with generating capacity less than 100 kW) or for participants located in a service territory of a cooperative transmission and distribution utility.

To be eligible for incentives, a generating facility must be 51% locally owned, use renewable energy resources (solar, wind, hydro, certain biomass, fuel cells, and tidal), be no larger than 10 MW in generating capacity, and be located in the State. Qualifying local owners include individuals, state and local government entities, federally recognized Indian tribes, nonprofit corporations organized under laws of the state, and business entities organized in the state with 51% local ownership. Furthermore, a community-based renewable energy project 100 kilowatts (kW) or greater must provide documentation of support from the municipality or tribe (where applicable) in which the project will be located. All projects must be grid-connected and put into service after September 1, 2009. Community-based renewable energy projects petition the PUC for certification and subsequent participation on the pilot program.

Program participants will have a choice of one of two following incentive options:

Long-term contracts
The PUC may require investor-owned utilities to enter into long-term contracts for energy, capacity resources, or renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by the community-based project (participation by cooperative utilities is voluntary). The contract term may not exceed 20 years. The PUC will conduct long-term contract solicitations for "large generators" (1 MW or greater). For these generators, the average price within each contract year may not exceed $0.10/kWh and it may not exceed the cost of the project plus a reasonable rate of return on investment. The contract price for "small" solar, wind, and hydro generators (less than 1 MW) will be $0.10/kWh. These small generators will contact their utility directly and present their community-based certification as well as the preferred contract terms. The utility will provide a standard contract (developed by the PUC, see Docket No. 2010-118 from March 2011) to the developer, and then submit a copy to the PUC.

Renewable energy credit multiplier
The value of a community-based generated renewable energy credit (REC) is 150% of the amount of the electricity. If the program participant chooses this incentive, the multiplier must be accounted for when the RECs are used to satisfy Maine's Renewables Energy Portfolio Standard.


The Maine PUC issued its Report on Community-Based Renewable Energy Pilot Program evaluation of the program to the legislature in January 2011.


As of December 2012, six projects totally over 24 MW have been approved for this program (four wind projects, one anaerobic digester, and one solar photovoltaic).
Community Conservation Challenge (Indiana) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: The Community Conservation Challenge (CCC) program is generally offered in the Fall. 2015 Applications will be available soon.


The Indiana Office of Energy Development (OED) is offering grants under the CCC program. Non-residential entities may apply to receive $25,000-$100,000 for community energy conservation projects. Projects must be located in Indiana and must use commercially-available technologies. The project must be visible to the public and have at least one community partner, though priority will be given to projects with support from multiple organizations. A cost share is not required but applicants are encouraged to leverage other funds in lieu of cost share.


Applicants may apply for either an Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy grant or an Alternative Fuel Vehicles grant. Eligible projects include projects that demonstrate measurable improvements in energy efficiency or renewable energy, projects that result in a reduction in energy demand or fuel consumption, or projects that implement an energy recycling process. Eligible technologies include alternative fuel on-road vehicles, biomass, energy efficiency including HVAC, lighting, and traffic signals, combined heat and power, geothermal, solar, solar hot water, waste management and recycling, water systems, and wind.


Applications are limited to one per applicant, and necessary materials are located on the program web site.
Community Development Block Grant (Kansas) Grant Program State/Province The Community Development Block Grant provides funds aimed at creating or retaining permanent jobs, which must be filled by a majority of low- and moderate-income persons. Eligible small city and county governments may apply for the Community Development Block Grant economic development funds to make infrastructure improvements designed to assist companies in creating jobs. These funds may also be used by a business to acquire land or buildings, construct or renovate facilities, purchase machinery and equipment or for working capital. Companies can apply for up to $35,000 per job created with a maximum limit of $750,000.
Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (United States) Grant Program
Loan Program
Federal Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and expansions for existing businesses. State programs help achieve the national objective of CDBG by funding projects in which at least 51 percent of the new jobs created are made available to low and moderate income individuals. The maximum amounts awarded under the program are $1 million for new businesses locating to the state and $500,000 for existing businesses expanding in the state.
Community Development Fund (Illinois) Loan Program State/Province The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available to start-up companies and existing small businesses.
Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Personal Tax Incentives State/Province The Community Economic Development Business (CEDB) program has been created as part of the Prince Edward Island Rural Action Plan to support local investment in innovative Prince Edward Island businesses.

The program is coordinated by the Department of Finance and Municipal Affairs under the Community Development Equity Tax Credit Act and its regulations. Its objective is to facilitate local investment in Prince Edward Island businesses, with the ultimate aim of stimulating rural community development.

The Community Economic Development Business program is a made-in-PEI initiative designed to achieve similar objectives to the Nova Scotia Community Economic Development Investment Funds.

Local investors in Community Economic Development Businesses will receive relatively generous personal income tax credits for their commitment to local community investment. An investment is eligible for RRSP tax deductibility. The total cost to provincial government will depend on the success of local entrepreneurs in establishing community economic development businesses as well as local community investment interest.
Community Energy Education Management Program (Oklahoma) State Loan Program State/Territory The Oklahoma Department of Commerce offers a revolving loan fund for local governments to make energy efficient improvements to government buildings. All eligible projects should increase energy efficiency, reduce energy consumption, project a positive return on investment and be paid back within 6 years of the loan award. Funds from this program can be used to pay for a technical assistance report/audit, energy conservation measures, and operation and maintenance procedures that would contribute to overall reduced energy consumption.

Generally, the loans will not be more than $150,000, and the average loan amount is around $60,000. An eligible local government may have only one active loan open at any time.

More information, including guidelines and an application, are available at the program website above.
Community Energy Partnerships Program (Ontario, Canada) Grant Program Utility The Community Energy Partnerships Program (CEPP) provides financial grants to community groups who are developing renewable energy projects in Ontario. These grants provide funding to community groups to assist with the "soft" or developmental costs associated with new renewable energy projects. Projects must be greater than 10 kW. Funding opportunities for renewable energy education projects are also available to assist not-for-profit, charitable and co-operative organizations in Ontario.

Community groups may be eligible to receive up to $500,000 for costs associated with project development. Eligible costs include site investigation and control, resource assessment, business and financial planning, engineering studies, project management and studies associated with the Renewable Energy Approval or other required approvals.

Funding under the CEPP and entry into a funding agreement is available to a community in the province of Ontario that is a “co-operative corporation”, as defined in the Co-operative Corporations Act (Ontario), all of whose members are resident in Ontario.
Community Feed-in Tariff (Nova Scotia, Canada) Performance-Based Incentive State/Province The Nova Scotia Community Feed-in Tariff (COMFIT) Program encourages community-based, local renewable energy projects by guaranteeing a rate per kilowatt-hour for the energy the project feeds into the province’s distribution electrical grid.

Through COMFIT, these smaller producers will be able to supply renewable energy to their specific community. Eligible entities include:

- combined heat and power (CHP) biomass facilities - Community Economic Development Investment Funds (CEDIFs) - co-operatives - Mi'kmaq band councils - municipalities or their wholly owned subsidiaries - not-for-profit organizations - universities

Eligible technologies include: - wind 50 kilowatts (kW) and under, or greater than 50kW - small-scale in-stream tidal - combined heat and power (CHP) biomass

- run-of-the-river hydroelectricity
Community Innovations Grant Program (Connecticut) State Grant Program State/Territory The Community Innovations Grants Program provides funding for communities to increase voluntary support for clean energy and to build model sustainable communities.

Cities, towns and municipalities are eligible to receive a grant of $4,000, which they will disperse to local groups and individuals as "micro-grants" of $250 to $2,000. To be eligible, cities or towns must commit to the state's "20% by 2010 Campaign" and the EPA Community Energy Challenge. Municipalities that have previously received a Community Innovations Grant are not eligible for this grant. At least 10 "at-large" recipients may receive a micro-grant of up to $1,000. “At-large” recipients include individuals who live in cities and towns that have not yet committed to the “20% by 2010” campaign, as well as non-profit organizations based in Connecticut.

The grants are awarded to eligible communities, and the funds are managed by a local energy task force in each participating community. In turn, these energy task forces, through a grant-giving process, provide micro-grants to organizations and citizens to start local projects that support clean-energy awareness and education within their communities. Applicants for individual micro-grants may apply to the local energy task force for funds ranging from $250 to $2,000 to support a public-awareness project or education project addressing the benefits and availability of clean energy.

The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority community search tool will let interested users know whether or not specific communities are eligible for a Community Innovations Grant or not.

This program is supported by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA), which is funded via a surcharge on electric ratepayers’ utility bills.
Community Service Block Grant Loan Program (Illinois) Loan Program State/Province Community Service Block Grant Loan Program is a partnership among the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, community action agencies, and the Illinois Ventures for Community Action. The program provides long-term, low-interest, fixed-rate loans to new or expanding businesses. Companies must create jobs for low-income individuals.
Community Wind Loan Program State Loan Program State/Territory The Arrowhead Regional Development Commission (ARDC) and the Northland Foundation have partnered to offer a revolving loan program for the development of community-based wind in the Arrowhead region of Minnesota. The program is part of the Rural Energy Development Initiative, which is sponsored by the State of Minnesota. Projects must be located in the Northeast counties of Minnesota, including Koochiching, Itasca, Aitkin, Carlton, St. Louis, Lake, and Cook counties.

Loan financing is limited to early stage project development and feasibility analysis for wind projects that intend to sell electricity to an electric utility. Eligible costs include:

  • Early stage project feasibility study expenses
  • Preliminary wind resource assessments
  • Meteorological data analysis and/or related equipment costs
  • Environmental, engineering, and geotechnical analysis/consulting
  • Accounting, finance, and other professional services consulting
Interested parties should sent a letter of interest describing the project to Bonnie Hundrieser (contact information listed below).
Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies’ Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut) Generation Disclosure State/Province Electric distribution companies shall utilize a competitive bidding process for electric generation services. The Department of Public Utility Control will be responsible for setting the criteria for this bidding process, which may include an evaluation of the cost of service, risk analysis, and use of renewable energy resources.
Competitive Grants to Local Governments (Florida) Grant Program State/Province The State of Florida distributes more than 60 percent of the State’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program from the US Department of Energy funds for energy efficiency and small scale renewable energy initiatives to cities and counties that were not eligible for direct formula grants from the Department of Energy. The Office of Energy is distributing these funds based on a competitive basis. Two-thirds of the available grant funds were made available on a competitive basis to all eligible local governments. Requested grant funding from any single applicant does not exceed 10 percent of the available grant funds. The remaining one-third of the available grant funds were dedicated to assist small counties and cities. A “small county” is considered to be a county with an unincorporated population of less than 50,000, while a “small city” is a municipality with a population of 15,000 or less. The maximum award amount in this category does not exceed $250,000.
Competitive Natural Gas Providers (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province Competitive providers and aggregators of natural gas must be certified by the Utilities Board. Applicants must demonstrate the managerial, technical, and financial capability to perform the proposed activities, and granted certificates may be subject to restrictions on a case-by-case basis.
Competitive Wind Grants (Vermont) State Grant Program State/Territory The Clean Energy Development Fund Board will offer a wind grant program beginning October 1, 2013. The grant program will replace the wind incentives that were originally part of the Small Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program. Systems up to 100 kilowatts are eligible for the grants. Details will be posted as more information becomes available.
Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act contains general provisions (sections 705-729), along with the Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act (sections 730-738) and the Controlled Allocation of Liability Act (sections 742-751). Together, the three sections describe state regulations pertaining to remedial actions following the release of hazardous substances. Private parties are encouraged to clean up sites where such releases have occurred, and funding is allocated to study, plan, and undertake the rehabilitation, removal, and cleanup of sites within the state at which no voluntary action has been taken.
Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province This Act enacts the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, which is a joint state and federal effort to provide for the conservation of the Everglades region. The plan regulates land and water use in and around Everglades National Park, and sets limitations on the development and modification of new and existing structures and facilities in the area.
Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province Each county is encouraged to develop and implement a local water management plan. This section sets the specifications that must be met by local plans. The status of county water plans is shown here: http://www.bwsr.state.mn.us/maps/Website/Land%20&%20Water/Water%20Management/County%20Water%20Plan%20Revisions.pdf See the Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act for a similar map of metropolitan water management plans.
Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Environmental Regulations State/Province This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste in the state of Texas and aid the implementation of resource recovery systems.
Compressed Air Energy Storage Act (Kansas) Environmental Regulations Local This act lays out regulations for the local authorities related to site selection, design, operation and monitoring for underground storage of compressed air.
Concord Municipal Light Plant - Solar Rebate Program (Massachusetts) Utility Rebate Program Utility Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are designed to offset the customer's electrical needs. Systems must be owned by the customer (no leased or rented systems are eligible) and located at the customer's premise. Customers should complete the solar application and sign the terms and conditions. In addition, customers must submit a copy of the installation contract, and CMLP interconnection application. Furthermore, customers must allow CMLP access to the property and system for a rebate verification inspection.
Connecticut Clean Energy Fund (Connecticut) Public Benefits Fund State/Territory Note: Connecticut's 2013 Budget Bill, enacted in June 2013, transfers a total of $25.4 million out of the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority into the General Fund - $6.2 million in FY 2014 and $19.2 million in FY 2015.

Connecticut's 1998 electric restructuring legislation (Public Act 98-28) created separate funds to support energy efficiency and renewable energy.* This information summarizes the renewable energy fund.**

A surcharge on Connecticut ratepayers' utility bills provides the funding for the renewables fund. In 2000-2001 the charge was set at $0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5 mill per kWh), rising to $0.00075 per kWh (0.75 mill per kWh) in 2002-2003 and "not less than" $0.001 per kWh (1 mill per kWh) beginning July 1, 2004. The fund is administered and governed by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority, a quasi-governmental investment organization granted a significant amount of flexibility by the Connecticut General Assembly to develop programs and fund projects that meet the fund's mission. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority receives guidance from a board of directors, whose members include the Commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, additional members are appointed by the Connecticut General Assembly, and the Connecticut's governor. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is required to approve a comprehensive plan for the fund and review annual reports. The fund is to be audited annually.

The fund is authorized to invest in solar-electric energy, solar-thermal energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, wave or tidal energy, fuel cells, landfill gas, hydrogen production and hydrogen conversion technologies, low-impact hydropower, low-emission advanced biomass conversion technologies, alternative fuels produced in Connecticut and used for electricity generation (including ethanol and biodiesel), usable electricity from combined heat and power (CHP) systems with waste-heat recovery systems, thermal storage systems, geothermal, and "other energy resources and emerging technologies which have significant potential for commercialization and which do not involve the combustion of coal, petroleum or petroleum products, municipal solid waste or nuclear fission, financing of energy efficiency projects, and projects that seek to deploy electric, electric hybrid, natural gas or alternative fuel vehicles and associated infrastructure and any related storage, distribution, manufacturing technologies or facilities."

Programs began in earnest in January 2000. For details on existing programs -- including funding amounts per program -- see the most recent annual report and the individual program records on DSIRE.

In addition, each of Connecticut's municipal electric utilities is required by statute to establish a fund to provide renewable energy, energy efficiency, conservation and load-management programs (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 7-233y). To support these funds, a surcharge is imposed on the customers of electric municipal utilities according to the following schedule: 1.0 mills on and after January 1, 2006; 1.3 mills on and after January 1, 2007; 1.6 mills on and after January 1, 2008; 1.9 mills on and after January 1, 2009; 2.2 mills on and after January 1, 2010; and 2.5 mills on and after January 1, 2011. Municipal electric utilities must adopt a comprehensive plan for the spending the money collected, and the plans must be consistent with the comprehensive plan of the state's Energy Conservation Management Board (ECMB).

* Connecticut's restructuring legislation also created a systems benefits charge to fund public education, weatherization and energy conservation measures for low-income residents, storage and disposal costs for spent nuclear fuel, and post-retirement costs for decommissioned nuclear reactors.

** Legislation passed in July 2011 completely restructured the Clean Energy Fund and created the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority. Under this new structure, the rate payer funds can be leveraged to raise private investment and further support renewable and clean energy development in the state.
Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut) Siting and Permitting State/Province Environmental impact reports must be prepared for all proposed projects initiated by state agencies or funded in whole or in part by the state. Reports will assess the likely direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of a proposed project; will be subject to a state review; and will be distributed publicly. The sponsoring agency must use the impact reports to make a final decision on whether to sponsor the proposed project.
Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff (Connecticut) Performance-Based Incentive Utility In July 2011, Connecticut enacted legislation amending the state's Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) and creating two new classes of renewable energy credits (RECs): Zero Emission Renewable Energy Credits (ZRECs) and Low Emission Renewable Energy Credits (LRECs). A Zero Emission Renewable Energy Facility is one that produces no emissions, such as solar, wind, or hydro. Owners of these facilities now have an opportunity to sell their ZRECs to the utility.


In coordination with the state's other investor-owned utility, Connecticut Light & Power offers owners of small ZREC projects (less than or equal to 100 kW) the opportunity to enroll in the Small ZREC Tariff Program. Current CL&P Small ZREC Tariff rate is $80.97 per REC.


The program is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Sellers must register with NEPOOL Generation Information System and must apply to the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) and be qualified as a RPS Class 1 generator. Equipment must be located behind the meter and have a dedicated ZREC meter. Customers may not have received funding or grants for the system from the state's Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (although customers that have received low cost financing are eligible).
Connecticut Light & Power - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) Performance-Based Incentive Utility In July 2011, Connecticut enacted legislation amending the state's Renewables Portfolio Standard and creating two new classes of renewable energy credits (RECs): Zero Emission Renewable Energy Credits (ZRECs) and Low Emission Renewable Energy Credits (LRECs).


The state's two investor-owned electric utilities, United Illuminating (UI) and Connecticut Light & Power (CL&P) must enter into 15-year contracts for RECs from zero-emission "Class I" renewable energy facilities (on the customer side of the meter) larger than 100 kilowatts (kW) but not larger than one megawatt (MW). Zero-emission Class I facilities include solar, wind and hydro generators. Resulting zero emission RECs (ZRECs) may be used for RPS compliance during the year of generation or the subsequent year. Utilities are required to spend $8 million on ZREC contracts annually.* The price cap of one ZREC in 2012 was $350 and $325.50 in 2013. The Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) may reduce the ZREC price cap annually by 3% to 7%.


The two utilities also must enter into 15-year contracts for RECs from low-emission Class I renewable energy facilities (on the customer side of the meter) up to 2 MW. The law establishes the emission criteria required to achieve "low-emission facility" status, but this category could include facilities that generate electricity using fuel cells, biomass or landfill gas. Resulting low-emission RECs (LRECs) may be used for RPS compliance during the year of generation or the subsequent year. Utilities are required to spend up to $4 million on LREC contracts annually.* The price cap of one LREC was $200 in 2012 and 2013.


The utilities jointly submitted their six-year solicitation plan in December 2011 and issued their first request for proposals (RFP) in May 2012. Winning bids are evaluated based on project quality, proposed ZREC or LREC price, and compliance with the RFP process. Bids are submitted online. Projects must be located in CL&P's or UI's service territory.


  • PURA is authorized to review this budget and make adjustments after Year 3 for LRECs and Year 4 for ZRECs. It may terminate the program entirely if technology costs do not continue to fall. Because the utilities must spend $8 million per year on new 15-year ZREC contracts and $4 million per year on new 15-year LREC contracts, the total value of the annual solicitation is $120 million for ZRECs and $60 million for LRECs.
Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) Siting and Permitting State/Province This section describes regulations and permit requirements for projects or activities which may lead to water diversion; however, many exemptions apply. Regulated activities include large withdrawals from groundwater resources, collection or discharge of runoff, water transfer, and relocation, retention, detention, bypass, channelization, piping, culverting, ditching, or damming of waters where the drainage area tributary to such waters is 100 acres or greater.
ConserFund Loan Program (South Carolina) State Loan Program State/Territory The South Carolina Energy Office offers the ConserFund Loan Program to fund energy efficiency improvements in state agencies, local governments, public colleges and universities, school districts and private non-profit organizations. The ConserFund Loan Program will fund a variety of efficiency improvements, but priority is given to projects that have a fast energy savings payback. Generally, ConserFund loans are to be used on retrofits of existing buildings. However, ConserFund may be used to finance energy recovery systems, ground source heat pumps, biomass, solar, and other renewable energy systems in new construction facilities.

Organizations may finance one or multiple projects, covering up to 100% of eligible project costs, from $25,000 to $500,000. Implementation of the energy efficiency improvement must begin within six months of the loan closing and the proposed energy improvement must have long-term cost reductions to qualify.

To start the financing process, download a form from the program website or contact the South Carolina Energy Office.
Conservation Districts (Montana) Siting and Permitting Local Local Conservation Districts in the state of Montana may be formed by approval of the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation and local referendum, to take place following a petition by 10% of qualified local electors. When formed, Conservation Districts function as governmental subdivisions of the state and may exercise public powers, such as by adopting and implementing regulations regarding local conservation, water and land use practices, and erosion control. The Department of Natural Resources and Conservation is tasked with encouraging the formation of Conservation Districts, offering assistance to Districts in carrying out policies and programs, and coordinating programs between Districts.
Conservation Districts (South Dakota) Siting and Permitting Local A Conservation District can be established by petition of registered voters within the territory proposed for organization into the district, with the approval of the State Conservation Commission. Conservation Districts have the authority to develop annual and long range ten-year comprehensive plans for the conservation of all renewable natural resources and for the control and prevention of soil erosion, flood prevention, or the conservation and development, utilization, and disposal of soil and water within the district. A Conservation District may also cooperate with local governments to implement area-wide waste management systems. Conservation Districts are overseen by the SD Department of Agriculture's Division of Resource Conservation and Forestry and the State Conservation Commission. These two entities are responsible for aiding the programs implemented by local Conservation Districts through education, funding, and technical assistance. They also review and make recommendations regarding all state and local natural resource development plans, and play a key role in enacting coordinated resource conservation plans throughout the state.
Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province When trees or portions of trees usable as firewood are removed from property under the control of a public utility, pipeline company, railroad, state agency or department, or a political subdivision, that portion of the tree material that is six inches or larger in diameter shall not be destroyed by open burning or deposited in a landfill without first being offered for use to the public, subject to the approval of the landowner or landowners involved.
Conservation of Oil and Gas (Texas) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This legislation prohibits the production, storage, or transportation of oil or gas in a manner, in an amount, or under conditions that constitute waste. Actions which may lead to the waste of oil or gas are listed, and include the operation of any oil well or wells with an inefficient gas-oil ratio as well as the wasteful burning of natural gas wells.
Conservation of Water Resources (Virginia) Environmental Regulations State/Province The State Water Control Board is responsible for formulating and implementing a comprehensive water use policy for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Implemented by the Department of Environmental Quality, the policy consists of ground water characterization, water supply planning, and water withdrawal permitting programs.
Construction Permits and Fees (New Mexico) Environmental Regulations
Fees
State/Province Industries that wish to build or modify facilities that emit air pollutants (emissions) into the air must obtain an air quality permit prior to constructing. Thus, these permits are called construction permits.

"Construction" means fabrication, erection, installation or relocation of a stationary source, including but not limited to temporary installations and portable stationary sources. The regulations establish the requirements for obtaining construction permits for air quality. The rule also establishes a schedule of fees for the construction permit program, including construction permits, permit revisions, and technical reviews of existing permits.

Two permitting divisions apply: Minor Source Units and Major Source Units.

Minor Source Units are for all sources with the potential emission rate greater than 10 pounds per hour, or 25 tons per year, of criteria pollutants (such as nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide). Air quality construction permits must be obtained for new or modified sources prior beginning construction.

Major Source Units are have a potential to emit more than 100 tons per year for criteria pollutants, or for landfills greater than 2.5 million cubic meters (2.5 million-mg). In addition, TV major sources also include facilities that have the potential to emit greater than ten tons per year of a single Hazardous Air Pollutant, or 25 tons per year of any combination of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP).
Construction Work in Progress (Kansas) Generating Facility Rate-Making State/Province This Act allows nuclear power plants to qualify for recovery of Construction Work in Progress (CWIP) and other preconstruction expenditures in rates. Previously, nuclear power plants were excluded from this treatment. The bill requires the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) to allow a utility to recover in rates prudent expenditures for developing a new nuclear plant. These development costs may include preliminary engineering, feasibility studies, prepayments for major equipment and permitting. Utilities can also seek predetermination of ratemaking principles that would apply to recover these costs. Costs of nuclear plant construction may be included in customer rates before the plant is operational. This legislation requires the KCC to allow utilities to capitalize and add to their rate base costs for energy efficiency, conservation and demand response programs.
Construction in Navigable Waters (South Carolina) Siting and Permitting State/Province This South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control program establishes a number of provisions regarding waters, water resources, and drainage in South Carolina. Navigable streams and rivers are declared to be common highways and “forever free”. The obstruction of such waterways is prohibited. A permit is required for hydroelectric projects necessitating the impoundment or diversion of navigable streams; some exemptions apply. The remainder of this legislation addresses permitting fees, landowner obligations, and the use of navigable waterways for timber transport.
Construction of Channels (Indiana) Environmental Regulations State/Province Permission is required from the Natural Resources Commission is required for the construction or alteration of artificial channels or improved channels of natural watercourses that connect to any river or stream in Indiana for the purpose of providing access by boat or otherwise to public or private industrial, commercial, housing, recreational, or other facilities. Prior approval by Department of Environmental Management is required for sewage disposal facilities involved with the channel and each facility that the channel is to serve before the Commission can consider the application.
Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Siting and Permitting State/Province Any petition for approval of construction of a nuclear energy generating plant within the state, or any petition for approval of the operation of a nuclear energy generating plant beyond the date established in a certificate of public good issued under this title, must be submitted to the public service board no later than four years before the date upon which the approval may take effect.

Upon receipt of a petition for approval of construction or operation as provided under this section, the public service board shall notify the general assembly of that fact. The public service department, with the review of the joint energy committee, is authorized and directed to arrange for studies to be conducted as appropriate to support the general assembly in the fact finding and public engagement process established in subsection (b) of this section.

Upon completion of the studies, the public service department shall provide the studies to the public service board and to the committees on natural resources and energy, the house committee on commerce, and the senate committee on finance, together with other information requested by the general assembly.
Consumers Energy - Experimental Advanced Renewable Program (Michigan) Performance-Based Incentive Utility Note: Check the program web site for application materials and information on future solicitations. Consumers Energy is not currently accepting applications for Residential and Non-Residential EARP Solar customers. Future phases are planned into 2015 as needed to meet program capacity targets. Consumers Energy is not currently accepting applications to the Anaerobic Digestion program.


The Experimental Advanced Renewable Energy Program (EARP) offers Consumers Energy residential and non-residential customers a buy-back tariff program for electricity produced by solar photovoltaic (PV) systems and anaeorobic digestion. The pilot version of the program began in 2009 and closed in December 2010, but an expanded version of the program has extended into 2015. Owners of residential systems from 1-20 kilowatt (kW) and non-residential systems from 1-150 kW are eligible to participate in the program. Residential customers must receive electric service on tariff rate RS or RT in order to be eligible for the program. Non-residential customers on tariff rates RS, RT, GS, GSD, GP, and GPD are eligible for the program. The expanded program is capped at 3,000 kW of capacity, with 1,500 kW for residential systems and 1,500 kW for non-residential systems. Contracts will be awarded in phases, with 125 kW available each quarter for residential customers, and 250 kW available for non-residential customers every six months.


It is important to note that this is not a net metering program and program participants are not eligible for net metering. Under the program, Consumers Energy will purchase all of the electricity produced by the system through a fixed-rate contract of up to 15 years. Contracts will be 15 years in length, but may not have a termination date of later than August 31, 2029. Electricity production is metered separately from the customer's existing electricity source (i.e., the grid). Participants are assessed a monthly System Access Charge equivalent to the existing distribution account used to qualify for the program to cover metering costs.* Systems with battery back-up or any other type of energy storage capability are not eligible to participate in this program. In order to be eligible for the program, solar equipment must be manufactured in Michigan or constructed by a Michigan workforce (detailed requirements are available on the program web site). The solicitation phases and purchase rates are as follows:


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Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida) Environmental Regulations State/Province It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish. It is not a violation of this section for any person, firm, or corporation engaged in any mining industry to discharge any water handled or used in any branch of such industry on the surface of land where such industry or branch thereof is being carried on under such precautionary measures as shall be approved by the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Contract Financing Program (Maryland) Loan Program State/Province The Contract Financing Program, administered by the Maryland Small Business Development Authority, provides financial assistance to eligible businesses in the form of a direct loan or the guaranty of loans made by a financial institution. The funds may be used for working capital, equipment purchase, and to complete work on contracts where a majority of the funds are provided by federal, state, local government, or a utility regulated by the Public Service Commission. Financing is limited to $1,000,000.
Contracts For Services (Tennessee) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province A corporation may contract with cities, towns, and villages, and with persons, for supplying them with water, light, heat, electricity, electrical and mechanical powers, and any other article or thing which it may produce or handle.
Control of Mississippi Headwater Lakes (Minnesota) Environmental Regulations State/Province The lakes at the headwaters of the Mississippi River are subject to joint federal and state control, and the Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources is responsible for establishing a plan for the operation of dams on each of the Mississippi headwater reservoirs.
Control, Prevention, and Abatement of Pollution of Surface Waters (North Dakota) Environmental Regulations State/Province It is the policy of North Dakota to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the waters in the state, and to require necessary and reasonable treatment of sewage, industrial, or other wastes. This section establishes the State Water Pollution Control Board, which may make recommendations regarding rules for the emission of polluting discharges to state waters; the Department of Health has the authority to enact these regulations. The Department of Health also administers programs pertaining to groundwater, waste water, surface water, storm water, animal feeding operations, and nonpoint sources.
Controlling Pollution (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province Permits are required for new or existing stationary potential sources of pollution, including anaerobic lagoons. Permits may also be required for modifications that may increase emissions. These rules describe procedures for obtaining permits and list special requirements for certain areas and permit types.
Corporate Headquarters Tax Credit (West Virginia) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Corporate Headquarters Tax Credit is available to companies who relocate their corporate headquarters to West Virginia and create 15 new jobs. The credit can offset up to 100% of the tax liability for business and occupation tax, business franchise tax, corporate net income tax, and personal income tax on certain pass-through income for up to 13 years.
Corporate Jobs Tax Credit (Louisiana) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province Corporate Jobs Tax Credit is a one-time tax credit ranging from up to $225 for each net new permanent job created as the result of a new business start-up or the expansion of an existing one. Credits may be used to satisfy state corporate income tax obligations. The program is offered to most industries.
Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities (Montana) Property Tax Incentive State/Territory Montana generating plants producing one megawatt (MW) or more with an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for the new or expanded industry property tax reduction. This incentive reduces the local mill levy during the first nine years of operation, subject to approval by the local government. If approved, the facility is taxed at 50% of its taxable value in the first five years following the issuance of the construction permit. Each year thereafter, the tax reduction decreases and the taxable value percentage is increased in equal increments until the full taxable value is attained in the tenth year. The tax reduction applies only to taxes levied for the local high schools and elementary schools and for the local government offering the reduction.

The taxable value varies, depending on the property ownership. If owned by a utility, an exempt wholesale generator or certain other electricity producers, the property is class 13 property and would otherwise be taxed at 6% of assessed value. If owned by an electric cooperative, the property is class 5 and would otherwise be taxed at 3% of assessed value. Certain electric cooperatives fall under class 7 or class 9 and property owned by those cooperatives is taxed at 8% of assessed value and 12% of assessed value, respectively. If owned by any other business, the real property is class 4 and would otherwise be taxed at 2.47% of assessed value. Personal property is class 8 with a tax rate of up to 3% of assessed value. The assessed value of class 4 property is adjusted every six years, and the assessed value of the other classes is adjusted yearly.
Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Generation Disclosure State/Province This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports required to be filed with the Commission.
County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development, and to promote the efficient use and conservation of energy resources.
County Planning, Zoning, and Recreation on Natural Streams and Waterways (Missouri) Siting and Permitting State/Province This legislation contains provisions pertaining to local planning and zoning issues, particularly regarding sites adjacent to natural streams and waterways. Certain counties are authorized to form county planning commissions, which direct and oversee planning and zoning decisions. Plans for developments or public improvements are subject to approval by county planning commissions, and commissions may also regulate the types of structures permissible on land in their jurisdiction. This legislation also addresses land acquisition for landfill purposes in certain counties. No additional restrictions are placed by this legislation on open-cut or strip mining; commercial structures are permitted in all districts except those zoned for residential or recreational use.
County Solid Waste Control Act (Texas) Environmental Regulations Local The purpose of this chapter is to authorize a cooperative effort by counties, public agencies, and other persons for the safe and economical collection, transportation, and disposal of solid waste to control pollution in this state.
Create Rebate Program (Arkansas) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province This program is offered by the Arkansas Economic Development Commission and is available to businesses after a business certifies to the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration that is has fulfilled the minimum payroll requirements and the reported payroll has been verified by the Department. The program provides annual cash payments based on a company’s annual payroll for new, full-time, permanent employees. In all tiers, a minimum payroll of new, full-time permanent employees of $2 million annually is required. The benefits depend on the tier in which a company locates. Tier 1 benefits are 3.9% and Tier 4 benefits are 5%.
Credit Enhancement Program (Oklahoma) Loan Program State/Province The Credit Enhancement Program is a means by which the Oklahoma Finance Authority provides guarantees for small companies, manufacturing facilities and communities in need of funds for expansion projects and infrastructure loans. "Credit Enhanced" financing carry a financial guarantee of the Credit Enhancement Reserve Fund (CERF). The fund assumes part or all of the risk of repayment of the credit enhanced notes or bonds. The two basic forms of lending utilized by ODFA are conduit and credit-enhancement financing. The Authority utilizes conduit financing to provide borrowers with lower cost financing, due to the Authority's standing as a public trust, without creating risk for ODFA itself.
Criteria and Conditions for Authorizing Withdrawal, Diversion, and Storage of Water (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations describe the criteria for the issuance of water withdrawal, diversion, and storage permits for irrigation, industrial use, and power generation, among other uses. The regulations list permit requirements for water drawn from streams, surface water, and groundwater sources.
Critical Areas Act of 1973 (Minnesota) Siting and Permitting State/Province This Act applies to certain areas of the state with important historic, cultural, or esthetic values, or natural systems with functions of greater than local significance. Plans for a given critical area will be determined by the local government in conjunction with either the regional development commission or the Environmental Quality Board. This Act describes permitting procedures for development activities proposed in critical areas.
Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland) Siting and Permitting State/Province This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas and to prevent the further degradation of water quality. Further development of non-water dependent structures and increase in lot coverage in these areas is presumed to be contrary to the policy of the state, and construction is therefore restricted in these areas. For the purpose of this legislation, "Critical Area" includes all land within 1,000 feet of the Mean High Water Line of tidal waters or the landward edge of tidal wetlands and all waters of and lands under the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
Currituck County - Wind Energy Systems Ordinance (North Carolina) Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Local In January 2008, Currituck County adopted an ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems. The ordinance directs any individual or organization wishing to install a wind-energy system to obtain a zoning permit from the county planning board. Small-scale systems require only administrative approval for the permit, while large systems and utility-scale projects require approval from the board of commissioners.

For the purposes of this ordinance, a wind-energy system is classified as "small" if it has a single turbine with a rated capacity of 25 kilowatts (kW) or less; as "large" if it consists of one or more turbines with a rated capacity of less than one megawatt (MW); and as "utility scale" if for installations of more than one turbine with a rated capacity of 1 MW or greater.

Height Requirements: The total height of a wind turbine is determined by the height above grade to the tip of the turbine blade as it reaches its highest elevation. Small wind systems are restricted to a 120-foot height limit, whereas large systems are restricted to a 250-foot height limit, and utility scale systems are restricted to a 500-foot limit.

Visual Appearance: Towers and rotor blades must maintain a galvanized finish in a non-obtrusive color such as white, off-white or gray. Wind systems must also remain free from advertising, including flags, streamers and other decorative items, as well as artificial lighting, except that which is required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Any on-site transmission or power lines must, to the extent possible, be placed underground.

Setbacks: The ordinance generally requires that non-utility-scale wind systems be set back from surrounding property lines by one linear foot for every foot of the turbine’s height. Utility-scale systems must be set back at least 1.5 times the turbine’s height. Small turbines must be placed on lots of at least 20,000 square feet, whereas large systems must be placed on lots of five acres or greater, and utility-scale systems must be placed on lots of at least 25 acres. All systems must maintain a set-back of at least 2.5 times their height from certain highways, and 1.5 times their height from public and private right-of-ways. There are also minimum setbacks for occupied buildings on the owner’s property and adjacent properties; however, these requirements may be waived if a written waiver is signed by all affected property owners.

Installation Requirements: The installation and design of all wind systems must comply with applicable industry standards and all electrical and mechanical components must conform to relevant local, state and national codes.

Impact Analysis, Mitigation and Planning: Applications for large wind-energy projects must include a site plan showing the location of each planned wind turbine relative to all proximate roads, property lines, buildings and geographical boundaries; decommissioning plans; signed and approved copies of any negotiated power purchase agreement; and, for utility scale projects, a detailed environmental impact study.
DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) Environmental Regulations State/Province This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of the District of Columbia that the generation of hazardous waste and the release of toxic chemicals is to be reduced or eliminated as quickly as possible.
DEMEC - Green Energy Fund (Delaware) Public Benefits Fund Utility Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under revision to improve program function and meet the requirements of the Delaware Energy Act. The Delaware Division of Energy and Climate webpage will provide details about relevant public meetings and workshops, proposed draft regulations, and other documents during the regulatory revision process.

Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, municipal utilities were allowed to opt out of the compliance schedule if they contributed to the Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or created their own green energy fund with an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of municipal utilities was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.

The Delaware Municipal Electric Corporation (DEMEC), a joint action agency and wholesale electric company representing the state's nine municipal utilities, opted out of the RPS requirements on behalf of the municipal utilities, and the utilities created their own funds. The surcharge for the investor-owned utility fund was doubled in 2007 through legislation, but the surcharge for the municipal utilities was not affected.

DEMEC municipal utility members include: Newark, New Castle, Middletown, Dover, Smyrna, Seaford, Lewes, Clayton and Milford. Each municipal utility has its own distinct fund. Customers of one utility cannot access another utility's fund revenues. As a result, some of the utilities' funds are very limited. Estimated annual income for each utility fund, based on 2008 retail sales data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), is included below:

  • City of Dover: $165,939
  • City of Newark: $9,318
  • City of Milford: $9,688
  • City of Seaford: $33,881
  • City of Lewes: $30,849
  • Town of Middletown: $5,336
  • City of New Castle: $31,817
  • Town of Smyrna: $9,775
  • Town of Clayton: $10,433
At the end of 2010 the DEMEC reported that the fund held approximately $307,036 between the nine municipal utilities. The DEMEC green energy funds support the municipal Green Energy Program Incentives, which include rebates for solar electric, solar heating, geothermal heat pumps, and wind power.
DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) (Delaware) Utility Rebate Program Utility Note: The municipal electric utilities serving New Castle, Clayton, Lewes, Middletown, Smyrna, and Seaford do not offer any rebates for individual renewable energy systems. Incentives are only available for residents of Dover, Milford, and Newark. Please see the program web site for further information on the use of green energy funds in these jurisdictions. Please also note that the renewable energy incentives offered by the city of Dover are summarized in a separate entry because they are structured differently than those offered by Delaware's other municipal utilities (view the Dover Green Energy Incentive Program).

Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. Incentives are available to both residential and non-residential member-owners, generally up to $15,000 for residential systems and $30,000 for non-residential systems. Both grid-connected and off-grid PV and wind energy systems are eligible for incentives, but systems must serve loads that would otherwise be served by the electric utility. Solar thermal systems used for domestic water heating or in radiant heating applications must reduce or eliminate the need for electric or gas heated water.

Incentive levels and limits vary by technology, system size and sector as follows:


· Solar Water Heating: 50% of installed costs, up to $3,000 for residential systems that pre-heat water for hot water systems, $5,000 for residential systems used in radiant heating applications, and $10,000 for all non-residential systems.


· PV: 33.3% of installed costs, up to $15,000 for residential systems and $30,000 for non-residential systems


· Wind: 33.3% of installed costs, up to $15,000 for residential systems and $30,000 for non-residential systems


· Fuel Cells: 33.3% of installed costs, up to $15,000 for residential systems and $30,000 for non-residential systems.


· Geothermal Heat Pumps: $500 or $600 per ton (based on efficiency), up to $2,500 or $3,000 for residential systems (based on efficiency) and $20,000 for non-residential systems


It is important to note that several exceptions to the amounts above exist for certain municipal utilities. The cities of New Castle, Clayton, Lewes, Middletown, Smyrna, and Seaford do not offer any rebates for individual renewable energy systems.

Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership. More information about the program is available in the program manual.

Background
Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, municipal utilities were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). All of Delaware's municipal utilities opted out of the RPS requirements and established their own green energy funds.

In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
DTE Energy - Solar Currents Program (Michigan) Utility Rebate Program Utility Note: ''''''''''Note: The Solar Currents program fulfilled phase two of their pilot program of additional 2 megawatts of customer-owned solar projects by 2015, and are no longer accepting applications. Although the program web site above links to the residential section of DTE Energy's web page, the program itself is not limited to residential customers. Other customers that meet the program requirements are also eligible to participate.

DTE Energy offers incentives through the Solar Currents program to its electric customers that install photovoltaic systems with a capacity of 1 kilowatt (kW) to 20 kW. For residential customers, the program offers both an up-front rebate of $0.20 per DC watt and a production incentive of $0.03 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by the system through August 31, 2029. The rates for non-residential customers are $0.13/W upfront and $0.02/W for the RECs. Both new systems and existing PV systems with valid DTE Energy Net Metering and Interconnection Agreements are eligible to participate in the program. All systems must be grid-connected, net metered, and be sized not to exceed on-site energy needs.

The up-front rebate (characterized as a REC pre-payment by DTE Energy) is payable upon the successful installation of the system.The production incentive payments are received as a credit on the customer's electricity bill. At the end of the calendar year the customer will receive a check for any unused bill credits from the utility if the balance is more then $250. The level of the production incentive is not affected by whether or not the system is a new system or an existing system.

The production incentive portion requires all systems to be equipped with a separate generation meter -- provided at no cost to the customer by DTE Energy -- to measure total system energy production (i.e., REC production). System owners are responsible for costs associated with connecting the system to the grid and for wiring and meter socket installation costs associated with the generation meter. Additional requirements, including minimum equipment standards (e.g., CEC listing for PV modules) and installer qualification requirements are described above and in further detail on the program web site. The utility recommends, but does not require, that all new systems carry a 5 year installation warranty, and manufacturer warranties of 5 years on inverters and 20 years on PV modules. All systems are subject to post-installation inspection by utility personnel.

The program is being offered as part of DTE Energy's compliance plan under the state Renewable Portfolio Standard. Four rounds of funding are expected, with 500 kW of installations expected each round. Pricing will be reviewed after each offering. For the first round of offerings, 1.5 MW is reserved for residential systems, and 0.5 MW is reserved for non-residential. The application periods will open on per the below schedule:


  • January 7, 2013
  • June 24, 2013
  • January 2014
  • June 2014


Please consult the program web site for additional information on net metering, interconnection requirements, and further program rules.
Dakota CDC Intermediary Relending Program (North Dakota) Loan Program State/Province The Dakota CDC Intermediary Relending Program makes IRP loans up to $250,000 available to qualified applicants for a variety of business purposes, including financing a new or existing business, purchasing or leasing equipment, or providing working capital. Repayment terms are based on the use of the loan proceeds or the life of the assets being finances. The average term is seven years or less.
Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) Siting and Permitting State/Province Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may also choose to construct dams, and has oversight of other dams for environmental and safety reasons. The Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources or a local government may provide a lease or development agreement for the development of hydropower on an existing structure.
Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction over dams as indicated in the subsections of the law. This includes all inspections, permitting, fees, reviews and investigations necessary to carry out the law. Currently, only four hydroelectric dams exist in West Virginia. This law does not apply to dams that are owned, operated and maintained by the federal government.
Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government and (a) have a structural height of more than 6 feet and a maximum storage capacity of 50 acre–feet or more of water, (b) have a structural height of 25 feet or more and a maximum storage capacity of more than 15 acre–feet of water, or (c) have a structural height of 6 feet or less or a maximum storage capacity of less than 50 acre–feet of water if the department determines that the dam is likely to endanger life, health or property if it is not designed, constructed or reconstructed in accordance with this chapter. Dams are exempt from the requirements of these regulations if they meet requirements which are at least as restrictive. Prior to dam construction or reconstruction, hazard ratings must be assigned to the project and estimated costs must be calculated. Additionally, a professional engineer registered in the state of Wisconsin must prepare several documents, which must be submitted to and approved by the Department of Natural Resources prior to the start of the project. These documents include plans and specifications for the dam project, as well as hydraulic, hydrologic, and stability analyses.
Dam Safety (Delaware) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare. The law requires licensing, inspections and preparation of emergency action plans (EAPs) for publicly owned dams with a high or significant hazard potential. A dam’s hazard potential classification depends upon the threat to downstream communities and infrastructure in the event of a dam failure and is not related to the condition of a dam. The Delaware Dam Safety Program was developed to reduce the risk of failure of dams and to prevent injuries to persons, damage to downstream property and loss of reservoir storage. The Dam Safety Regulations, adopted on December 11, 2009, establish requirements for licensing existing dams; permitting construction of new dams and repairs to existing dams; conducting inspections; performing maintenance; and preparing EAPs. In 2007, DNREC was awarded state funding to develop Emergency Action Plans for Delaware’s highest priority, state-owned, high-hazard dams.
Dam Safety (Michigan) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from the Department of Environmental Quality
Dam Safety (North Carolina) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and environmental health. The rules and regulations in this chapter are intended to carry out the purposes of the Dam Safety Law of 1967, which authorizes the implementation of a dam inspection and certification program in the interest of public health, safety and welfare.
Dam Safety (Pennsylvania) Environmental Regulations
Safety and Operational Guidelines
State/Province The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the health, safety and welfare of its citizens and their property. This division is required to assure proper planning, design review, construction review, maintenance monitoring and supervision of dams and reservoirs. This requirement is mandated by the Dam Safety and Encroachments Act, as amended, and the Pennsylvania Code. The division directs and coordinates field investigations with regional offices on authorized projects during construction; provides program guidance and coordination to regional program staff in the periodic inspection of all existing dams to determine their condition and safety; and directs, coordinates and develops policies and technical standards in the area of dam safety for the Department.
Dam Safety Program (Florida) Safety and Operational Guidelines
Training/Technical Assistance
State/Province Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), the local government and private dam owners.

Dam safety training is provided by the BMMR for state, regional, and local regulatory agency personnel and dam owners, with the assistance of the ASDSO, in accordance with the performance requirements of the dam safety grant provided through the National Dam Safety Program led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Dam inspections in Florida are conducted by agency personnel at the state, regional, and local levels, as related to their respective regulatory programs, as well as by private dam owners. Oversight for phosphate mining and similar industrial impoundments is primarily the responsibility of the FDEP. Other dams generally fall within the purview of the USACE, the State’s five regional water management districts, or local government agencies.
Dam Safety Program (Maryland) Safety and Operational Guidelines
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent dam failures and protect environmental resources. Permits are required for the construction and modification of structures, and dams are reviewed based on their assigned hazard rating.
Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. Any person or entity proposing to construct, enlarge, repair, or alter a dam or reservoir must obtain written permission from the Permit Board prior to commencement of any site work related to the project. The Permit Board may require any information necessary to evaluate a proposal. Any person intending to acquire the right to store or use water from a reservoir formed by a dam shall submit an application for a surface water use permit to the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with Mississippi Code Annotated, Sections 51-3-5 and 51-3-7, and the regulations of the Commission promulgated thereunder. Within 30 days after completion of a dam, the owner shall submit 1 complete set of as-built plans and specifications to the board. The submittal shall include a letter by the professional engineer responsible for the project.

High Hazard Dams are classified by dams in which failure may cause loss of life, serious damage to residential, industrial, or commercial buildings; or damage to, or disruption of, important public utilities or transportation facilities such as major highways or railroads. Dams that are proposed for construction in established or proposed residential, commercial, or industrial areas will be given a High Hazard classification. Most projects carried out for energy generation will be high hazard.

A surface water permit may also be required for any person to impound and store water behind a dam. Any changes to the dam must be immediately reported to the MDEQ. The owner shall perform a visual inspection every 60 days and after every major rainfall event over the watershed.
Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Siting and Permitting State/Province All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may be subject to periodic inspections. The construction of new dams is also subject to inspection throughout and following the building process.
Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of dams and also establishes requirements to govern the disbursement and use of moneys held in the State Dam Safety Rehabilitation Revolving Fund. These rules do not apply to dams owned, operated, and maintained by the federal government.
Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure. The requirements in this subchapter shall not affect or relate to a dam or reservoir in the pinelands area, which will raise the waters of any river or stream less than eight feet above the surface of the ground where the drainage area above the same is less than one square mile in extent and where the water surface created by the dam or reservoir is less than 100 acres in extent except that the commissioner may investigate and take appropriate action regarding any dam or reservoir about which he has a security or safety concern.
Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to be prepared and implemented by owners and also requires monitoring, inspection and reporting of conditions affecting the safety of dams, water obstructions and encroachments. No person is authorized to construct, operate, maintain, modify, enlarge or abandon any dam, water obstruction or encroachment without the prior written permit of the department.
Dams (South Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork required if (a) the proposed dam will impound 25 acre feet of water or less at the primary spillway elevation, and (b) is constructed on either a dry draw or non-navigable stream but not on a navigable stream. A dry draw, in South Dakota law, is defined as any ravine or watercourse with less than 0.4 cubic feet of average daily flow from May 1st to September 30th.

A Water Right Permit is required if (a) the proposed dam will impound more than 25 acre feet of water at the primary spillway elevation, (b) diversions will be made from the dam to serve some use other than reasonable domestic use, or (c) the proposed dam is being constructed on a navigable stream. If any of these conditions apply, an application for a Water Right Permit must be filed and approved prior to building the dam.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources has enacted dam safety rules (SDAR 74:02:08). For the purpose of these regulations, "a structure is a dam if (a) the height to the dam crest is greater than or equal to 25 feet AND the storage at the dam crest (not at the spillway elevation) is greater than 15 acre feet OR (b) if the height to the dam crest is greater than 6 feet AND the storage at the dam crest (not at the spillway elevation) is greater than or equal to 50 acre feet.

The height of the dam is the difference in elevation between the natural bed of the watercourse or the lowest point on the toe of the dam, whichever is lower, and the crest elevation of the dam."
Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control. Owners of dams and reservoirs are responsible for maintaining the safety of the structures, and must follow directives from the Department regarding dam maintenance, alteration, reconstruction, and removal in the event of unsafe conditions or lack of maintenance. Owners must also obtain Department approval prior to the construction, repair, alteration, enlargement, or removal of any dam or reservoir. Some exemptions apply for state- and federally-owned dams and small structures.
Dams – Fishways (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.
Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices: Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water impoundments. The Dam Safety page of the State Water Commission website contains further information regarding dam inspections.
Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a dam across any watercourse, provided that: (a) the entity is chartered to construct, operate and maintain mills, electric power and light works, or other machinery; (b) the watercourse is not a navigable stream; and (c) the entity is the proprietor of the land on which the dam is to be erected or is the owner of the land on one side of the stream where the dam is to be erected. This legislation contains additional procedures which must be followed to lawfully erect a dam.
Delaware Electric Cooperative - Green Energy Fund (Delaware) Public Benefits Fund Utility Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under revision to improve program function and meet the requirements of the Delaware Energy Act. The Delaware Division of Energy and Climate webpage will provide details about relevant public meetings and workshops, proposed draft regulations, and other documents during the regulatory revision process.

Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.

The Delaware Electric Cooperative, the state's lone cooperative, opted out of the RPS requirements and established its own green energy fund. Based on 2008 retail electricity sales data from the DEC annual report, the fund has an annual income of approximately $206,000. The surcharge for the investor-owned utility fund was doubled in 2007 through legislation, but the surcharge for the Cooperative's fund was not affected.

The Green Energy Fund supports the Cooperative's Green Energy Program Incentives, which include rebates for distributed renewable energy systems. The eligible technologies listed in this entry are based on those described in the program regulations. Incentive programs for a given technology may or may not be active at any point in time.For more information on eligibility requirements and funding, reference the Delaware Electric Cooperative's Renewable Resource Fund Program guide.
Delaware Electric Cooperative - Green Energy Program Incentives Utility Rebate Program Utility NOTE: The Renewable Resource Program will accept requests for grant funding for calendar year 2013 beginning January 9, 2013. Applications for residential PV and geothermal systems will not be accepted after 4:30 pm on January 15, 2013. Applications for all other systems will be accepted until this year’s program budget of $260,481 is exhausted. For 2013, the total annual funds available will be allocated as follows: Small Wind Turbines = 2%, Geothermal Systems = 28%, PV Class A = 50%, PV Class B = 20%.

The Delaware Electric Cooperative provides incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by DEC member-owners. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. Incentives are available to both residential and non-residential member-owners based upon average peak demand over a 12 month period. Class A member-owners are defined as those with an average monthly peak electric demand of 50 kilowatts (kW) or less over the previous twelve months. Class B member-owners are those with an average monthly peak electric demand of greater than 50 kW over the previous twelve months. Maximum incentives are up to $7,500 for Class A and $10,000 for Class B and non-profit systems.

Applicants may be required to have an energy audit performed by a Building Performance Institute (BPI) certified contractor prior to grant approval. Energy Star homes may be exempted from this requirement. Both grid-connected and off-grid PV and wind energy systems are eligible for incentives, but systems must serve loads that would otherwise be served by the electric utility. Solar thermal systems used for domestic water heating or in radiant heating applications must reduce or eliminate the need for electric or gas heated water. Renewable energy systems designed and utilized as a third-party ownership or independent power producer are not eligible for grant funding.

Incentive levels and limits vary by technology, system size and sector as follows:

Solar PV

  • Class A and Class B: $.90/W for the first 5 kW of capacity (0-5 kW) and $0.45/W over 5 kW. Maximum incentive of $7,500 for Class A and $10,000 for Class B.
  • Non-profits: $1.05/W for the first 5 kW of capacity (0-5 kW) and $.52/W over 5 kW (5-10 kW). Maximum incentive of $10,000 for non-profit systems.

Solar Thermal

  • Domestic Hot Water: 20% of installed costs up to $3,000 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems.
  • Radiant Heating: 20% of installed costs up to $5,000 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems

Wind: $1.25/W up to $2,500

Fuel Cells: 20% of installed costs, up to $7,500 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential systems

Geothermal Heat Pumps: $800/ton for first two tons and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $5,000 for residential and $10,000 for non-residential systems.

Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership.

Background Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). The Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC), the state's lone cooperative, opted out of the RPS requirements and established its own green energy fund.

In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program (Delaware) Grant Program State/Province The Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program is funded by the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Fund, established by the Act to Amend Title 7 of the Delaware Code Relating to a Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and CO2 Emission Trading Program.

The Fund allocates 10 percent of the proceeds derived from the auction of carbon allowances under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) to projects and other actions that result in a measurable reduction of greenhouse gases. Projects must result in quantifiable and verifiable reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in Delaware not otherwise required by federal or state law and not receiving funding from any other state sources.

Delaware-based businesses, state/municipal agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) such as business sector associations, homeowner associations, academia and/or non-profit assistance providers are eligible to apply for funding under this Grant Program.
Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the existence and location of state resource areas, their degree of endangerment, an evaluation of their importance, and information related to their natural, historic or open space values.

The Act also established an Open Space Program. The Open Space Program oversees the protection of designated State Resource Areas (SRA). These areas are permanently protected through the buying of various state lands including parks, fish and wildlife areas, forests, nature preserves and cultural sites.

Many SRAs are not protected through acquisition – the intent has not been to purchase all SRAs. Rather, the purpose of the SRAs is to guide state acquisition of open space from willing sellers and to be incorporated by counties in their land use plans.

Designation of an SRA does not prohibit development, and does not change the underlying zoning. The designation provides that county ordinances, standards, criteria and/or requirements for SRAs will allow for environmentally sensitive development that protects the natural, cultural and geological resources in those areas.
Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Environmental Regulations
Siting and Permitting
State/Province The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware). Its five members include the basin state governors and the Division Engineer, North Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who serves as the federal representative. The commission has legal authority over both water quality and water quantity-related issues throughout the basin.

Much of the new drilling interest taking place in northeastern Pennsylvania and southern New York is targeted at reaching the natural gas found in the Marcellus Shale formation, which underlies about 36 percent of the Delaware River Basin.

In connection with natural gas drilling, the commission has identified three major areas of concern:

1) Gas drilling projects in the Marcellus Shale or other formations may have a substantial effect on the water resources of the basin by reducing the flow in streams and/or aquifers used to supply the significant amounts of fresh water needed in the natural gas mining process. 2) On-site drilling operations may potentially add, discharge or cause the release of pollutants into the ground water or surface water. 3) The recovered "frac water" must be treated and disposed of properly.

While the Delaware River itself is un-dammed, there are 13 dams within the basin that feed into the river. The Commission holds authority to approve any project that will have a substantial effect on the water resources of the basin.

The Commission also has approval authority over energy projects that need to draw water from the basin, including coal plants, biomass plants, and natural gas extraction and power plants.
Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals, recommendations, and standards for turning waste into energy for the state.
Delaware Strategic Fund (Delaware) Grant Program State/Province The Delaware Strategic Fund represents the primary funding source used by Delaware Economic Development Authority (DEDA) to provide customized loans and grants to businesses for job creation, relocation and expansion. For businesses considering locating in the state of Delaware, financial assistance may be provided in the form of low interest loans, grants, or other creative instruments to support the attraction of businesses that pay sustainable wages. Assistance terms are negotiated specific to each firm’s individual needs and situation. The process for obtaining Strategic Fund assistance requires completing an Application for Financial Assistance. Competition for the limited amount of funding available each year is strong and approval is not automatic. Applications are first reviewed by the DEDO Internal Investment Committee and if approved will be presented at a Council on Development Finance meeting. If the CDF recommend financial assistance from the Strategic Fund, a formal agreement will be prepared for execution. This agreement will contain business terms plus a customized recapture provision based on forecasted jobs and minimum salary requirements determined by location.
Delmarva Power - Green Energy Program Incentives (Delaware) State Rebate Program State/Territory Note: On July 1st of 2014 the Green Energy Program PV rates changed.


The Green Energy Program actually consists of three separate programs: one for Delmarva Power & Light (DP&L), the state's only investor-owned utility; one for the state's municipal utilities; and one for the Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC). The investor-owned utility program was established as part of The Electric Utility Restructuring Act of 1999, and is supported under Delaware's public benefits program, the Delmarva Power Green Energy Fund. Under the program, incentives are available for the installation of qualifying photovoltaic (PV), solar water heating, wind turbine, fuel cell, and geothermal heat pump systems. The Fund may also be used to support energy efficiency education programs. The program has recently been revised to allow projects financed using third-party power purchase agreements (PPAs). Grant eligibility and terms for PPA projects are determined by the eligibility of the project owner. Grant reservation request forms and interconnection requirements and forms may be downloaded from the Web site shown above.

Under the investor-owned program, 40% of rebate funding is available for residential customers and 60% of funding is available for non-residential customers, including energy efficiency education programs.* The total of all grants may not exceed 65% of the total annual revenue collected for the Delmarva Power Green Energy Fund. Incentive terms vary by technology, system size and sector as follows:

Solar PV, Wind


  • PV system capacity is limited to 50 kilowatts (kW) per installation address (regardless of the number of meters or systems installed at that address). Systems larger than 50 kW do not qualify for an incentive.
  • General Incentive: $.85/W for first 5 kW and $0.25/W up to 50 kW. The maximum incentive is $15,000 for residential projects and $24,000 for non-residential systems.
  • Non-profit Incentive: $1.75/W for first 5 kW and $1.00/W up to 50 kW. The maximum incentive is $50,000 for non-profit systems.

Solar Thermal (Domestic Hot Water, Radiant Heat)


  • General: $1.00 per annual kWh saved, up to $5,000 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential systems.
  • Non-profit: $2.00 per annual kWh saved up to $10,000.

Geothermal Heat Pumps


  • General: $800/ton for first two tons and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $5,000 for residential and $30,000 for non-residential systems.
  • Non-profit: $1,000/ton for the first two tons of and $800/ton for additional capacity, up to $30,000.

Fuel Cells


  • Incentive levels are currently under review by program administrators. Previously, the incentive was set at 50% of installed costs, up to $22,500 for residential systems and $250,000 for non-residential systems.

All systems must be installed by a participating contractor and carry a full five-year warranty. Beginning December 10, 2010 energy audits will be required for all existing buildings prior to grant approval. In addition, for projects undertaken as part of new construction, the building will have to be Energy Star certified in order to qualify for incentives. For further details on systems that qualify for rebates under this program, see the Green Energy Program Rules.

To be eligible for funding consideration, an Energy Efficiency Information Program must encourage energy efficiency improvements through education, information, or promotion. Proposals may target groups of consumers, using outreach, communications, technical support, or analytical resources. Energy Efficiency Information Programs may include residential or nonresidential customers.

*S.B. 266 signed in July 2010 readjusts this allocation and requires that 60% of the funding support residential programs while 40% goes to non-residential.
Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Solar Rebate Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility Denton Municipal Electric (DME) offers rebates to its electric customers for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) and solar water heating systems. The solar rebates are designed for residential and small commercial customers and are available for both existing buildings and new construction. Applicants must be a home or rental property owner.


The following requirements apply to the PV rebate:


  • Applicant must contact Program Manager to receive Interconnection Agreement, Application for Interconnection Packet, and GreenSense PV Rebate Agreement.
  • All applications are processed on a case by case basis.
  • Structures will only qualify for this rebate once.
  • Documents must be completed and approved PRIOR to installation of the photovoltaic system. Post inspections by DME and the City of Denton Building Inspections Department are required on all installations before issuance of the rebate.

The following requirements apply to the solar water heater rebate:


  • Solar water heater must be sized to accommodate a family of four, at minimum.
  • Solar water heater must preheat water for an electric water heater that is permanently installed at the structure.
  • Solar water heater must have permanently installed electric backup.
  • Structures will only qualify for this rebate once per 12-month period.
  • Applications must be completed and approved PRIOR to installation of the solar water heating system. Post-inspections by DME and the City of Denton Building Inspections Department are required on all installations before issuance of the rebate.

Failure to follow these or other requirements of the City of Denton Building Inspections Division may render the system ineligible for the incentive and the system will not be allowed to interconnect with the DME electrical grid. Requests for payment must be received by DME within 30 days of installation. Credits will be made to the electric utility accounts of electric utility retail customers that purchase the qualified equipment. Participating builders that install qualified systems will receive a cash payment. All installations must be for accounts served by DME and must meet all applicable national, local, and manufacturers’ codes and specifications.

The DME Application for Interconnection and the DME interconnection Agreement detail specific requirements for this rebate.
Department of Natural Resources and Water Divisions (Nebraska) Siting and Permitting State/Province This chapter describes the duties of the Department of Natural Resources and divides the state into two water divisions for administrative purposes. Water Division 1 consists of all the lands of the state drained by the Platte Rivers and their tributaries lying west of the mouth of the Loup River, and all other lands lying south of the Platte and South Platte Rivers that may be watered from other superficial or subterranean streams not tributary to the Platte River. Water Division 2 consists of all lands that may be watered from the Loup, White, Niobrara, and Elkhorn Rivers and their tributaries, and all other lands of the state not included in any other water division.
Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.
Development Opportunity Zone Credits (Wisconsin) Corporate Tax Incentive
Personal Tax Incentives
State/Province The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and retention of new, full-time jobs, environmental remediation, and capital investment.
Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are defined as projects that will permanently impact 5,000 square feet or more of wetlands or waterways, including the 100-year floodplain and are located in an area identified as potentially impacting a nontidal wetland of special State concern. Major and minor projects permits are subject to varying application fees and approval processes. Section 5-901 et seq. off the Environment Article contains more specific information on application and permit procedures. More information on nontidal wetlands classifications: http://www.mde.maryland.gov/programs/researchcenter/factsheets/waterfactsheet/documents/www.mde.state.md.us/assets/document/wetlandswaterways/classification.pdf More information, Maryland Nontidal Wetland Mitigation Guidance: http://www.mde.maryland.gov/programs/water/wetlandsandwaterways/aboutwetlands/documents/www.mde.state.md.us/assets/document/wetlandswaterways/mitguidefeb72011.pdf
Developmental Tidal Feed-in Tariff Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Performance-Based Incentive State/Province The Developmental Tidal Feed-in Tariff (FIT) program is similar to the Community Feed-in Tariff (COMFIT) program as it encourages the development of specific renewable energy projects by guaranteeing a rate per kilowatt hour for the energy the project feeds into the province’s electricity grid. It is different as it is designed to incent tidal energy developers to test and deploy their large-scale in-stream tidal energy projects in Nova Scotia. This tariff applies to in-stream tidal single device projects or arrays greater than 0.5 megawatts (500 kilowatts). There are no limits on ownership.
Direct Discharge Permit (Vermont) Environmental Regulations State/Province A direct discharge permit is required if a project involves the discharge of pollutants to state waters. For generation purposes, this involves the withdrawal of surface water for cooling purposes and the subsequent discharge of heated waters and or other effluents and pollutants.
Direct Loan Program (Connecticut) Loan Program State/Province The Connecticut Development Authority’s Direct Loan Program provides direct senior and subordinated loans and mezzanine investments to companies creating or maintaining jobs. Up to $20,000 per job is available and proceeds may be used for working capital, equipment purchase, mortgage payments, or Brownfield remediation or redevelopment. The program provides access to loan funds that are otherwise unavailable to the borrower.
Direct Loan Program (Kentucky) Loan Program State/Province The Direct Loan Program, is designed to allow businesses to obtain the long term financing needed to encourage growth. The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority (KEDFA) may participate in projects with loans ranging from $25,000 to $500,000. The amount of KEDFA participation is dependent on the project fixed asset cost. To participate, project owners must inject a minimum of 10% toward the fixed assets.
Direct Loan Program Subchapter 5 (Vermont) Loan Program State/Province The Direct Loan Program assists Vermont borrowers in financing fixed assets and in cooperation with commercial banks. The Vermont Economic Development Authority may either make its own direct loan or purchase a portion of a bank loan to enable greater access to debt financing for Vermont businesses. The loan may be used for the purchase of land and buildings, including construction or renovation, and for the purchase and installation of machinery, equipment, furniture, and fixtures.
Distributed Generation Standard Contracts (Rhode Island) Performance-Based Incentive State/Territory NOTE: The third enrollment period for standard contracts for 2014 closed on November 7.


Rhode Island enacted legislation (H.B. 6104) in June 2011 establishing a feed-in tariff for new distributed renewable energy generators up to three megawatts (MW) in capacity. The law requires electric distribution companies to enter into standard contracts for an aggregate capacity of at least 40 MW by the end of 2014. Standard contracts include a fixed payment rate and a 15-year term, and generally vary by generator capacity and type.


Eligible renewables include solar energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, geothermal energy, small hydropower, biomass facilities that maintain compliance with current air permits,* and fuel cells using renewable resources. Separate classes have been established for “large” generators and “small” generators. Small generators include solar energy systems between 50 kilowatts (kW) and 500 kW, and wind energy systems between 50 kW and 1.5 MW. The Distributed Generation Standard Contract Board will determine capacity limits for other “small” systems, but limits may not exceed 1 MW. (The Board is authorized to modify this program in several ways, as specified in the authorizing legislation.) Payment rates vary by system size and type.


The contracting period is spread over four years. The following annual minimum targets for standard contracts have been established:


  • By December 30, 2011: 5 MW of aggregate capacity
  • By December 30, 2012: 20 MW of aggregate capacity
  • By December 30, 2013: 30 MW of aggregate capacity
  • By December 30, 2014: 40 MW of aggregate capacity

The Board must set ceiling prices by October 15 for the following calendar year. Each electric distribution company must conduct one standard contract enrollment period in 2011 and at least three enrollment periods in subsequent program years. Each enrollment period will be open for two weeks.


Eligible small and large projects will be assessed separately, and projects from each class will be awarded standard contracts based on the lowest proposed prices received. Eligible systems that are net-metered may apply to sell excess output.


* Waste-to-energy combustion systems are explicitly excluded.
Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers in New York State, except for private land in river areas within the Adirondack Park. The regulations specify that all new land use or development in river areas requires a permit, with some exceptions. The regulations define three classes of rivers (wild, scenic, and recreational) and set management rules specific to each. Some exemptions apply. The regulations specify that no new dams or waterway modifications can be constructed on any wild, scenic, or recreational rivers, and no new construction or operation of hydropower facilities is permitted on wild rivers. New hydropower facilities at existing dams on scenic and recreational rivers are allowed, pending certain requirements.
Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all times and to comply with Department inquiries for information on the status of a given dam.
Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from facilities located in the Great Lakes basin in excess of 100,000 gallons per day averaged over any consecutive 30-day period and to water withdrawals that result in a water loss from the Great Lakes basin in excess of 2,000,000 gallons per day averaged over any consecutive 30-day period. Facilities which have a valid water supply or transport permit and hydroelectric facilities licensed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission are not subject to the registration requirements in these regulations.
Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to any form of draining, dredging, excavation and removal, either directly or indirectly; any form of dumping, filling or depositing, either directly or indirectly; erection of any structures or construction of any roads, the driving of any pilings or placing of any other obstructions, whether or not changing the ebb and flow of the tide. The regulations allow only those uses of tidal wetlands and areas adjacent thereto that are compatible with the preservation, protection and enhancement of the present and potential values of tidal wetlands that will protect the public health and welfare, and that will be consistent with the reasonable economic and social development of the State. The regulations list land use guidelines and permit requirements in tidal wetland areas
Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions apply. The regulations list procedures for acquiring permits and procedures used in classifying areas as freshwater wetlands. The Department of Environmental Conservation is responsible for classifying and mapping such areas, with the exception of lands in Adirondack Park, where the Adirondack Park Agency is responsible.
Division of Water, Parts 670-672: Reservoir Releases Regulations (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province Water releases from New York State reservoirs are subject to monitoring and regulation; these sections establish rules for the Schoharie, Shandaken Tunnel-Esopus Creek, Cannonsville, Pepacton, Neversink, Ashokan, Kensico, Rondout, Croton System (Boyds Corner, West Branch, Bog Brook, East Branch, Middle Branch, Croton Falls, Cross River, Titicus, Amawalk, Muscoot and New Croton), Mongaup System (Toronto, Swinging Bridge, Cliff Lake, Rio), East Sidney Lake, Sleepy Hollow Lake, Cooper Lake, and Sturgeon Pond reservoirs. The purpose of regulating such releases of water is to protect and enhance the recreational use of the rivers and streams affected by those releases, while ensuring, and without impairing, an adequate supply of water for power production or for any municipality which uses water from such reservoirs for drinking and other purposes.
Division of Water, Parts 700-750 and Parts 800-941: Classes and Standards of Quality and Purity (New York) Environmental Regulations State/Province These sections describe general standards of water quality and purity as well as standards for specific water bodies (Parts 800-941). The regulations provide classifications for different types of waters and set standards for each. Standards include prohibitions on the discharge of certain substances and “best use” guidelines, as well as criteria for water purity, temperature, and allowable discharges. Part 704 (http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/4589.html) refers specifically to allowable thermal discharges.
Dollar and Energy Savings Loans (Nebraska) State Loan Program State/Territory The Nebraska Dollar and Energy Savings Loan program was created in 1990 using oil overcharge funds. The program, administered by the Nebraska Energy Office, makes available low-interest loans for residential and commercial energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy projects.


Renewable energy projects may be eligible for a loan under one of two circumstances. First, a project may be eligible if it is included in a list of prequalified improvements. This list includes a variety of renewable energy projects, including wind, photovoltaics, solar hot water heating, and fuel cells. Second, projects not listed as prequalified improvements may be eligible with the submission of an energy audit that verifies that the project will have a reasonable payback period (varies by improvement type).

Process


The program works by leveraging of State Energy Office funds through collaboration with individual Nebraska banks, savings institutions, and credit unions. An individual seeking a loan under this program first approaches his or her financial institution, which approves the project on financial terms. The financial institution then gains approval from the Energy Office, who can purchase 50%, 65%, or 75% of the loan at 0% to deliver a low interest rate to the borrower.


Terms and Conditions


Under the program the simple interest rates are 5%, 3.5%, or 2.5% for the borrower, depending on the project. Prequalified projects are financed with a low-interest loan for up to 15 years for home and building improvements, 5 years for appliances, and 3 to 10 years for other prequalified projects.


Most loan applications are reviewed and processed within 10 working days. All qualifying work should be completed within 5 months of Energy Office's commitment of funds to invest in lender's fund.


As of August 2011, about 300 lenders at 900 Nebraska locations offer Dollar and Energy Savings Loans, and more than $250,000,000 has financed more than 26,000 projects.
Dominion Virginia Power - Solar Purchase Program (Virginia) Performance-Based Incentive Utility In March 2013, the Virginia State Corporation Commission approved a rate program for Dominion Virginia Power customers that install solar PV systems. The rate was approved at 15 cents per kWh with a 5 year contract. Both residential and nonresidential customers are eligible for the program. The program is capped 3 MW, with 60% of the capacity reserved for residential customers and 40% reserved for nonresidential customers. Customers must install a separate meter for the PV system and sell all of the generation back to Dominion. Customers will pay a charge for the meter. Application materials are available on the program web site. Participation is based on a first-come, first-serve basis until it reaches the 3 MW cap.


The program is considered a pilot program that will last for 5 years, at which point the Dominion will decide whether or not to move forward with a permanent program.
Dorchester County - Renewable Zoning (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local Dorchester County zoning codes specifically permit solar arrays and small wind turbines in many zoning districts.
Dorchester County - Wind Ordinance (Maryland) Siting and Permitting Local This ordinance amends Chapter 155 of the Dorchester County Zoning Ordinance in order to add small wind energy systems as an accessory use in all zoning districts.
Dover Public Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (Delaware) Utility Rebate Program Utility NOTE: Starting Nov 25, 2013 City of Dover PV grants programs have been suspended for revision.


Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. The green energy programs offered by the state's municipal utilities occasionally vary from city to city. The Dover Green Energy Incentives program is unique in that the incentive levels and limits are distinctly different from those offered by the other municipal utilities, as well as those offered by Delmarva Power and the Delaware Electric Cooperative. For information on the incentives offered by other utilities, please visit the DSIRE Delaware page. The incentives offered in Dover are detailed below.


Solar Thermal (Domestic Hot Water, Radiant Heat): $1.00 per annual kWh saved, up to $2,500 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems


Wind: The incentive is $1.25/watt (W) for the first 5 kilwatts (kW) of capacity (0-5 kW), $0.75/W for the next 5 kW (5-10 kW), and $0.35/W for the next 40 kW (10-50 kW) with a maximum incentive for all sectors set at $2,500

Geothermal Heat Pumps:$800/ton for the first two tons of and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $3,000 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential and non-profit systems.

Fuel Cells: 20% of installed costs, up to $7,500 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential and non-profit systems.

Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. In addition, to encourage energy conservation, an energy audit requirement has been instituted for both residential and non-residential customers as a condition of eligibility. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership. More information about the program is included in the program manual.


Background
Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, municipal utilities were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). All of Delaware's municipal utilities opted out of the RPS requirements and established their own green energy funds.

In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
Drainage Districts (Montana) Environmental Regulations State/Province A Drainage District may be created by petition of landowners who desire to construct one or more drains, ditches, levees, waste ditches, or other works across the lands of others or to straighten, widen, deepen, or otherwise alter any natural stream or watercourse not navigable. Such activities must be for the promotion of the public health or welfare and the drainage of the lands and removal of surface waters therefrom; or the desire to maintain and keep in repair any such drain, ditch, or levee heretofore constructed under any law of this state. This section provides information pertaining to the creation, dissolution, operation, and alteration of such districts. Districts are authorized to issue bonds and otherwise finance relevant projects, and to participate in flood control and planning, as well as development activities.
Drainage, Sanitation, and Public Facilities Districts (Virginia) Siting and Permitting State/Province This legislation provides for the establishment of sanitary, sanitation, drainage, and public facilities districts in Virginia. Designated districts are public bodies, and have the authority to regulate the construction and development of sanitation and waste disposal projects in their jurisdiction.
Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province This chapter provides regulations for the disposal of dredged and fill material. Any entity desiring to dispose of such material must first obtain a permit, and the State Engineer has the responsibility to specify a disposal site for each permit application. General permits may be issued on a regional basis.
Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) State Loan Program State/Territory The Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund provides low-cost financial assistance to eligible public water systems to finance the cost of repair and replacement of drinking water infrastructure, maintain or achieve compliance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SWDA) requirements, and protect drinking water quality and public health.


The program offers principal forgiveness starting at 25% of project costs. Depending on determinations to be made by the New Mexico Financing Authority, additional principal forgiveness for up to a total of 75% of project costs may be awarded for communities that qualify as disadvantaged communities and certified "green projects". Green projects include green infrastructure, water conservation, energy efficiency improvements, or other environmentally innovative activities. See the website above for complete details, including the fiscal year 2015 Intended Use Plan (effective July 2014).
Duke Energy - Net Metering (South Carolina) Net Metering Utility In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an [2] order mandating net metering be made available by the regulating utilities; the order incorporates a net metering settlement signed by the individual interveners, the Office of Regulatory Staff and the three investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The order detailed the terms of net metering, including the ownership of RECs in South Carolina and standardized the structure of net metering programs offered by the IOUs.

Net excess generation (NEG) is credited to the customer's next bill at the utility's retail rate, and then surrendered to the utility annually at the beginning of each summer season on June. Net-metered customers' on-peak generation (under the TOU tariff) may be used to offset off-peak consumption, but not vice versa. Significantly, these tariffs involve additional charges that do not apply to customers who do not net meter. Duke Energy requires net-metered customers to switch to a TOU tariff (which incorporates potentially high demand charges into its fee structure) or charges customers additional monthly fees, including stand-by charges.

Systems must comply with the South Carolina Standard for Interconnecting Small Generation 100 kW or less with Electric Power Systems (EPS). For more information, see the utility's program web site.
Duke Energy - Solar Renewable Energy Credits Program (Ohio) Performance-Based Incentive Utility Note: In order to participate in this program, customers must have signed an agreement by December 31, 2012. Check the program web site above for information regarding future solicitations.


Duke Energy Ohio offers the Solar Renewable Energy Credits program to residential customers in Ohio that install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. One solar renewable energy credit (SREC) is created when a PV system generates one megawatt (MW) of electricity. The prices are set by market conditions for the year in which the REC was created. The price for RECs in 2010 was $300.


In order to qualify for the program, a customer must register the facility with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio and establish an account with either the Generating Attributes Tracking System (GATS) or the Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS). Eligible customers must sign a 15-year purchase agreement with Duke Energy by December 31, 2012 and sign an interconnection agreement with the company. PV systems comply with the standard net-metering requirements of Duke Energy's net metering program, and systems 6 kilowatts (kW) or larger require an additional meter.


Once a customer signs a purchase contract with Duke Energy, RECs will be certified by the tracking company after December 31 of each year. The customer must then transfer the RECs and forward an invoice directly to Duke Energy on or before February 15 in order to receive payment.
Duke Energy Florida - SunSense Commercial PV Incentive Program (Florida) Utility Rebate Program Utility Note: The SunSense Program will resume for 2015 and begin accepting applications on January 14, 2015 at 1:30 PM. On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after 2015.'''


In March 2011, Progress Energy Florida began offering incentives to commercial customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Incentive rates are based on a tiered structure:


  • $2.00/watt for the first 10 kilowatts (kW)
  • $1.50/watt for 11 kW to 50 kW
  • $1.00/watt for 51 kW to 100 kW


Systems may be larger than 100 kW, but incentives only apply to the first 100 kW of the system, with a maximum total incentive of $130,000 per customer. All systems must be at least 2 kW in capacity and certified by the Florida Solar Energy Center. In addition, all systems must be installed by a licensed contractor and connected to Progress Energy Florida's grid.
Duke Energy Florida - SunSense Solar PV Rebate Program (Florida) Utility Rebate Program Utility '''Note: The SunSense Program will resume for 2015 and begin accepting applications on January 14, 2015 at 1:30 PM. On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after 2015.''''''


Progress Energy Florida (PEF) has allocated $1.9 million per year towards residential photovoltaic (PV) incentives. PEF will accept applications annually from residential customers both wishing to install a PV system and qualifying for a rebate. Reservations for a rebate will be issued on a first-come basis, however a reservation does not guarantee that a rebate will be awarded, only that funding for a rebate is available should the system be installed, meet all requirements and pass inspection.


To qualify for the residential PV program, an applicant must be a Progress Energy Florida (PEF) customer and a homeowner. The applicant must also be the account holder, use the home as a primary residence and own the solar PV system  installed on the home. Other requirements include:


  • PEF must approve application and conduct an on-site Home Energy Check (HEC) prior to PV system installation
  • The proposed PV system must be certified and approved by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)
  • Systems must be installed by a licensed contractor, meet electric and safety standards
  • Participating customers’ systems must be directly connected to the PEF system by following the DEF interconnection procedures.

Customers with PV systems ranging in size from 2 kW DC to 10 kW DC are eligible to participate and may earn an incentive based on the kW value. Installations of systems system larger than 10 kW are permissible, but the incentive is limited to a maximum of $20,000 per residence. After installation, the PV system must be capable of producing at least 1,000 kWh per kW DC each year.


Once the limit of $1.9 million in rebates is achieved, the application process will be closed. The process will be re-opened again October 1 of each year for systems to be installed the following calendar year.


For an application checklist, further requirements and additional resources regarding the rebate please visit theDEF Solar PV website.
Duke Energy Progress - SunSense Residential PV Incentive Program (North Carolina) Utility Rebate Program Utility Duke Energy Progress is offering incentives for their residential customers to install photovoltaics (PV) systems on their homes through their SunSense Program. The incentive is multifaceted. Customers will receive an upfront payment of $500 for every kilowatt-AC (kW-AC) they install on their home, and they will receive monthly credits on their bill of $4.50 per kW-AC. For instance, if a customer installs a 10 kW-AC system, the largest system eligible to participate in the program, the customer will receive a check for $5,000 plus a bill credit of $45 on their monthly bills.



To participate in the program, the customer must surrender all their Renewable Energy Credits (RECs*) to Duke Energy Progress for a period of five years and they will receive the $4.50 per kW bill credits throughout those five years. After those first five years, there may be an opportunity for the customer to renew their REC contract with Progress Energy under the terms of the agreement that exists at that time.

Systems must be connected to the grid and be net metered to participate. As a condition of the net metering agreement, the residence must be billed on a time of use demand tariff, where their electricity rate is a factor of the time of day and year.

*Duke Energy 'Progress is purchasing RECs to comply with North Carolina's renewable energy and energy efficiency portfolio standard. Since 'Duke Energy 'Progress is purchasing the RECs, customers cannot sell their RECs to NC GreenPower or any other REC purchaser for the duration of their contract with 'Duke Energy 'Progress.
Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative - SunWatts Rebate Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Utility Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative is providing rebates to for the purchase of renewable energy systems through its SunWatts program. Photovoltaic (PV) and wind energy systems 10 kilowatts (kW) or less can receive an upfront rebate of $1.00 per watt, up to 40% of the system's cost. Solar water heating systems can receive a rebate of $0.75 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of estimated energy savings in the first year. PV and wind systems larger than 10 kW and other renewable energy types may be eligible for a performance-based incentive awarded on a competitive basis.
EXP Job Creation Incentive Program (Connecticut) Loan Program State/Province The EXP Job Creation Incentive Program provides loans towards expenditures related to training, marketing, working capital, or other Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development-authorized expenses. Loan amounts range from $10,000 to $300,000 with a 4% interest rate. DECD may choose to defer loan payments or forgive up to 50% of the loan if job creation goals are met. DECD offers a matching grant program to small businesses that are likely to maintain job growth.
EXP Revolving Loan Fund (Connecticut) Loan Program State/Province The EXP Revolving Loan Fund provides loans between $10,000 and $100,000 with a 4% interest rate for a maximum ten-year term. The loans may be used to purchase machinery and equipment, for construction or relocation costs, working capital, or other business-related expenses authorized by the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development.
Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa) Bond Program State/Province Through its Economic Development Bond Program, the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) issues tax-exempt bonds on behalf of private entities or organizations for eligible purposes. The responsibility for repayment of the bonds rests with the applicant. Neither IFA nor the State of Iowa has any liability to repay the debt. IFA does not buy the bonds or sell the bonds. Applicants are responsible for finding an entity to purchase the bonds.

If the project is qualified and IFA will be the issuer of the bonds, an Economic Development Revenue Bond Program application must be completed and submitted to IFA, along with a $1,000 fee for applications up to $10 million and $2,500 fee for applications over $10 million. The application fee will be subtracted from the issuer fee at closing.

Once the application is submitted and the application fee is paid, the application is considered by IFA’s Board of Directors. IFA’s Board meets monthly. Applications must be received approximately ten days prior to a Board meeting to be considered at that meeting. If the application is approved by the Board of Directors, IFA will hold a public hearing and consider approving the issuance of the bonds for the borrower at a later meeting.

Because Federal tax requirements limit the amount and type of expenses that can be reimbursed with bond proceeds, the borrower should seek approval of the project by the Board before beginning work or expending funds on the project. Economic Development Bond applications will expire if the bonds are not issued within 18 months.

At the time of closing, IFA requires the borrower to pay a fee, usually 10 basis points, for administrative costs. IFA does not pay for costs or legal fees of the borrower or any other costs incurred as a result of the issuance of the bonds.

There will be a $2,500 charge for any resolution coming before the IFA Board that is not part of a bond issue that will have a closing fee. This would primarily include amending resolutions to prior bond issues.

The fee for a special IFA Board meeting is $2,500. This fee is in addition to any other fees charged.
Economic Development Fund (New York) Loan Program State/Province Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing and a range of assistance to businesses, municipalities, IDAs, and other economic development organizations, and the funds can be used for working capital, training, equipment, construction, and a variety of other costs.
Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Economic Development Incentive Program (EDIP) is a tax incentive program designed to foster job creation and stimulate business growth throughout the Commonwealth. Participating companies may receive state and local tax incentives in exchange for job creation, manufacturing job retention and private investment commitments.
Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Loan Program State/Province The Economic Development Loan Fund helps to fill the financing gap between private debt financing and private equity. Up to $1 million is available for each project and can be used for the acquisition of land or facilities, or the purchase of machinery or equipment. Projects must create new jobs or “save” jobs in underserved or distressed areas. Eligible businesses include those engaged in technology, and those that provide for a locality’s economic and “quality of life” development.
Economic Development Project Districts (Indiana) Enterprise Zone State/Province Redevelopment commissions may petition legislative bodies to designate economic development project districts in cities with populations between 80,500 and 500,000. Such districts may be established if it is found that the completion of the redevelopment and economic development of the district will attract new business enterprises to the district or retain or expand existing business enterprises in the district, benefit the public health and welfare and be of public utility and benefit, protect and increase state and local tax bases or revenues, and result in a substantial increase in temporary and permanent employment opportunities and private sector investment within the district. Once established, improvement projects in these districts may be eligible for bond financing, remitted funds, and tax incentives.
Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province The Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) program provides financial assistance to those businesses and industries requiring such assistance in order to create new job opportunities. Assistance is provided to encourage new business start-ups, expansion of existing businesses, new capital investment, and/or the relocation of out-of-state businesses into Iowa. Assistance may be provided in the form of direct loans or forgivable loans.

Priority is given to projects that will create manufacturing jobs, add value to Iowa resources and/or increase exports out of state. Preference will be given to those businesses which will create or retain the greatest number of jobs with the least amount of program dollars. Refinancing or restructuring of existing loans and projects involving a single retail establishment will be considered low priorities. In order to receive funding, programs must be “necessary and appropriate” and only the minimum amount of EDSA funds necessary to meet this may be provided. The only three valid criteria to determine this need are: a financing gap, insufficient return on investment or location disadvantages.

The EDSA is funded by the Job Creation, Retention and Enhancement Fund, which assists businesses that are creating new jobs by providing a direct or forgivable loan or through infrastructure projects. It also provides industry driven training assistance designed to help the underemployed and working poor obtain the training and skills they need to move into available higher-skill, better-paying jobs. Assistance is provided to leverage private financing in business activities resulting in the creation or retention of jobs principally for low- and moderate-income persons. Although the program provides financial assistance to businesses, the application must come from a public “sponsor”. Iowa cities under 50,000 population (with the exception of Cedar Falls) and all counties are eligible to apply on behalf of business within their jurisdiction.
Economic Development Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Economic Development Tax Credit (ETC) program was enacted in 2009 and eliminated five existing tax credit programs (Agricultural Development Zones, Airport Development Zones, Community Development Zones, Enterprise Development Zones and Technology Zones) and replaced them with a comprehensive program enabling businesses to earn tax credits based on jobs, capital investment, training and the location or retention of corporate headquarters. The Economic Development Tax Credit Program offers tax credits against a business’s income tax liability. Tax credits may be earned 1) through the creation of full-time positions meeting a pre-determined rate; 2) through capital investments on property and equipment; 3) by providing training to employees; and 4) by locating company headquarters in Wisconsin.
Economic Development and Pollution Control (Indiana) Bond Program State/Province This legislation establishes possible financing avenues for pollution control facilities that may mitigate or reduce pollution, or treat substances in processed materials that may cause pollution. The legislation specifically coal with CSS using coal from Indiana mines as preferable and eligible for financing through bonds.
Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program (Illinois) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program encourages companies to remain, expand, or locate in Illinois. The program provides tax credits to qualifying companies equal to the amount of state income taxes withheld from salaries for newly created jobs. A company must make a capital investment of $5 million and create a minimum of 25 jobs to be eligible. A company must also demonstrate that it had considered locating out-of-state.
Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit is awarded to businesses with projects that result in net new jobs. The tax credit must be a major factor in the company’s decision to move forward with the project in Indiana. The refundable tax credit is calculated as a percentage of the expected increased tax withholdings generated from the new jobs. The credit is phased in over ten years.
Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana) Industry Recruitment/Support
Bond Program
State/Province A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to issue revenue bonds to finance economic improvement projects.
Economic Inducement Financing Program (Connecticut) Loan Program State/Province Companies relocating to or expanding within the state are eligible for CDA direct loans up to $5 million through its Economic Inducement Financing Program. proceeds may be used for working capital, equipment, facilities, or mortgages. Eligible companies must contribute to Connecticut’s technology base, intellectual capital, urban infrastructure, economic base, employment, tax revenues, or export of products and services.
Economic Recovery Loan Program (Maine) Loan Program State/Province The Economic Recovery Loan Program provides subordinate financing to help businesses remain viable and improve productivity. Eligibility criteria are based on ability to repay, and the loan is repayable over five years at a fixed interest rate.
Economic Redevelopment & Growth Program (New Jersey) Grant Program State/Province Economic Redevelopment and Growth program (ERG) is an incentive for real estate development projects that have a financing gap, defined as having insufficient revenues to support the project debt service under a standard financing scenario. It can also apply to projects that have a below market development margin or rate of return. The grant is not meant to be a substitute for conventional debt and equity financing, and applicants should generally have their primary debt financing in place before applying. In order for a project to be approved, it needs to undergo a rigorous analysis of the sources and uses of funds, construction costs and projected revenues.

Approved developers/owners are eligible to receive up to 75% of the incremental increase in approved State revenues that are directly realized from the businesses operating in the

redevelopment project premises.
Edison Innovation Clean Energy Manufacturing Fund - Grants and Loans (New Jersey) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory The Edison Innovation Clean Energy Manufacturing Fund (CEMF) is intended to provide assistance for the manufacturing of energy efficient and renewable energy products that will assist Class I renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies in becoming competitive with traditional sources of electric generation. The CEMF is administered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) and is structured to provide grants (Tranche I) and loans (Tranche II) for certain business development activities that further these goals within the State of New Jersey. Applicants may apply for both tranches together or separately apply for Tranche II funds, but Tranche I applicants must also apply for Tranche II funding. The program first opened early 2009, but the most recent solicitation was issued in May 2011. The program is currently accepting applications on an open, rolling basis.


The total amount of available funding is capped at a maximum of $3.3 million per project. A minimum 50% cash match of total project costs is required to be from non-state derived matching funds. This incentive program is directed at commercial manufacturing; prototype development projects are not eligible. Further details of each Tranche are provided below:

Project Assessment and Design Grants (Tranche I)
The CEMF will provide a grant of up to $300,000 for costs associated with site assessment, procurement, and design of an eligible facility. Qualified Tranche I costs may include identifying and securing a project site and obtaining the necessary permits and regulatory approvals. The grant may not exceed 10% of the total amount of funding requested for the project as a whole. Twenty percent of the grant is available up front at the time of closing.

Project Construction and Operation Loan (Tranche II)
A maximum $3 million is available in the form of a ten-year loan at an interest rate of 2% to support site improvements, equipment purchases, facility construction and completion. Repayments begin at the start of the fourth year following the close of the loan. Projects that meet certain milestones may be eligible to convert up to $1 million of the loan into a performance grant.

The CEMF is funded by the state societal benefits charge (SBC), thus proposed projects in municipalities that do not pay into the SBC will not be eligible for funding under this program. The 2012 Board of Public Utilities Clean Energy Budget Order specifies new 2012 funding of $2 million for the program. The overall program budget for 2012 is somewhat larger because it contains unused funds from prior years. In order to be considered for funding, applicants must submit an Eligibility Intake Form. For additional details please see the program web site, which contains the program solicitation, application information, and FAQs.
Edison Innovation Green Growth Fund (New Jersey) Loan Program State/Province The EIGGF offers loans up to $2 million with a performance grant component to support technology companies with Class I renewable energy or energy efficiency products or systems that have achieved "proof of concept" and successful independent beta results, have begun generating commercial revenues, and will receive 1:1 match funding by time of loan closing. Photovoltaic, solar, wind energy, renewably fueled fuel cells, wave, tidal, sustainable harvested biomass, and methane gas from landfills qualify, as well as other technologies or equipment that can demonstrate their integral nature to the development of Class I renewable energy technologies, including technologies that produce or support the production of renewable or clean electricity generation.
Edison Innovation Green Growth Fund Loans (New Jersey) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory
Note: The energy efficiency technologies indicated as "eligible" above are examples of possible eligible technologies listed on the program web site. Other products that conserve electricity or natural gas may also be eligible. The renewable energy technologies listed above are those deemed "Class I Renewable Energy" under the New Jersey renewables portfolio standard (RPS). For more detailed definitions please see the program web site.

The Edison Innovation Green Growth Fund (EIGGF), administered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, offers loans to for-profit companies developing Class I renewable energy (as defined under state renewables portfolio standard) and energy efficiency products. In order to qualify for a loan, the product in question must have already achieved "proof of concept" and have begun to generate commercial revenues.

Eligible energy efficiency products must conserve the end use of natural gas or electricity. Energy efficiency products which improve the efficiency of electricity or gas generation, transmission or distribution are not eligible. Renewable energy products or equipment must be demonstrably integral to the development of Class I renewable energy resources. A company receiving loan funds must, among other requirements, employ 75% of it's W-2 employees within New Jersey or commit to growing 10 high-paying jobs with a minimum salary of $75,000 over two years, and have management with equity in the company (see program web site for further eligibility details).

Loans from $250,000 to $2 million are available under the program, with a fixed five-year term and 2% interest rate. Borrowers must be able to supply a 1:1 cash match to the loan from non-state grants, deeply subordinated debt or equity. Up to 50% of the loan may be converted to a performance grant at the end of the five-year term based on the borrower's successful achievement of specific business milestones. Such milestones may include revenue, employment, or other targets established prior to the close of the loan.

The EIGGF is funded by the state societal benefits charge (SBC), thus proposed projects in municipalities that do not pay into the SBC are not be eligible for funding under this program. The 2012 Board of Public Utilities Clean Energy Budget Order specified total 2012 funding of $3.94 million for the program.

In order to be considered for funding, applicants must submit an Eligibility Intake Form. For additional details please see the program website, which contains the program solicitation, application information, and FAQs.
Efficiency Maine Renewable Energy Program (Maine) State Rebate Program State/Territory Note: All program funding has been fully allocated, and reservations are no longer being accepted. At this time, there are no plans for future solar or wind rebates.


History

In June 2005, Maine enacted legislation (L.D. 1586) creating a rebate program for photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar-thermal systems installed at homes or businesses. Legislation enacted in April 2008 (L.D. 2283) extended the program to grid-tied wind-energy systems installed after January 1, 2009. The Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) developed rules to implement the program. Rebates for PV and solar-thermal installations were unavailable for 2009. However, the governor signed legislation (L.D. 220) in early May 2009 directing the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to utilize funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to increase this rebate program by $500,000 per fiscal years 2009-10 and 2010-11. This legislation also required the PUC to amend the rules in order to create performance standards for solar and wind energy systems and to require applicants to calculate a simple payback period as part of the application process. In September 2009, Maine passed a large energy bill called the "Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future" (H.P. 1038). This legislation transfers all of the funding and programs over to the Efficiency Maine Trust. Legislation enacted in June 2011 (HB 568) fixes a legislative glitch with the rebate program (a result of the Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future, the program was allowed to sunset on December 31, 2010) and directs Efficiency Maine to establish new rules for the rebate program, which it did in November 2011 as part of its Renewable Resource Fund Regulations.

The rebate program has been historically funded by an assessment on the state's transmission and distribution utilities. A total of $500,000 in funding has been available for rebates annually. Of this sum, the Public Utilities Commission had allocated traditionally 60% to rebates for solar-thermal systems, 20% to rebates for PV systems, and 20% to rebates for wind-energy systems. During fiscal years 2010 and 2011, this rebate program was increased by $500,000 per year with money allocated from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Funding for FY2012 of approximately $1,000,000 was approved in September 2011 and the traditional allocations are no longer applicable. (See the 2012 Efficiency Maine Annual Report for more information.)
Efficiency Maine Small Business Loan Program (Maine) State Loan Program State/Territory Note: Efficiency Maine advises that funding for this program has been fully allocated; Efficiency Maine is not accepting loan applications. The below summary is for information only.


Maine's Small Business Low-Interest Loan Program provides loans of up to $35,000 at 1% interest* to small businesses to support approved energy efficiency measures. Efficiency Maine Trust administers this program, with the assistance of the Finance Authority of Maine (FAME) who completes underwriting and credit rating. Businesses and non-profits that use less than 25 kilowatts of electricity per month are eligible.

To qualify, a business must undergo an energy audit to identify necessary improvements. The audit may be completed by Efficiency Maine Trust or an Efficiency Maine Trust approved energy auditor. After the audit is completed, the business must submit the application for pre-approval. Following approval by Efficiency Maine Trust, the application will be forwarded to FAME to determine the creditworthiness of the business. The applicant is responsible for up to $500 in loan closing costs and must cover at least 10% of the energy efficiency upgrade costs. In general efficiency upgrades are eligible, although renewable energy systems may be eligible for a loan provided significant energy savings are demonstrated.

Loans terms vary depending on project, the loan amount, and client cash flow. Collateral is required to secure the loan. Note that schools, hospitals, and facilities with residential components, such as apartment buildings, condominiums, or private residences are not eligible for participation in this program.


*Interest rates are subject to change.
Efficiency Maine Trust (Maine) Public Benefits Fund State/Territory Maine's public benefits fund for energy efficiency was authorized originally in 1997 by the state's electric-industry restructuring legislation. Under the initial arrangement, the administration of certain efficiency programs was divided among the State Planning Office (SPO), the state's electric utilities and the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC). However, general dissatisfaction by the Maine Legislature (and many other stakeholders) with the administration of the fund prompted revisions in 2002. As a result of the 2002 legislative amendments, the authority to develop energy-efficiency programs was effectively transferred from the SPO to the PUC, and the authority to implement these programs was transferred from the state's electric utilities to the PUC.

Recently, the Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future (Public Law 372, June 2009) established a new entity, the Efficiency Maine Trust, which became responsible for Maine's energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. All of the funds in Efficiency Maine were transferred to Efficiency Maine Trust July 1, 2010.* [www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/bills_125th/chapters/PUBLIC637.asp Public Law 637] of 2012 provided additional budget oversight to the Legislature, requiring Efficiency Maine Trust to provide reports to the Legislature twice per year on the status of the fund's budget and programs.

By statute, at least 20% of funds must support energy programs for low-income residents, and at least 20% of funds must support energy programs for small business customers. The PUC assesses utilities to collect funds for energy programs and administrative costs. The fixed amount of the assessment is 0.145 cents per kilowatt-hour (1.45 mills/kWh).

There is no expiration date for the fund. In general, Efficiency Maine supports improvements in lighting efficiency, reductions in peak demand, high-performance buildings, appliance replacements for low-income residents, energy training and certification, and public education. The fund collected approximately $12.4 million in FY2010, approximately $12.9 million in FY2011, and $13.2 million in FY2012 from assessments on the utilities. In addition, Efficiency Maine Trust manages money from the Regional Green House Gas Initiative and grants, such as those received from the Federal government's American Recovery Reinvestment Act (ARRA) in 2010. In FY2012, the fund collected approximately $34 M from all sources.


The Efficiency Maine Annual Reports includes additional details on the fund and the types of projects funded.


  • In addition, Public Law 655 (2010) mandates that state revenue generated from energy corridor development on state-owned land would be deposited to the Efficiency Maine Trust (80%) and a new Transportation Efficiency Fund (20%).
Efficiency Maine Trust - Renewable Resource Fund (Maine) Public Benefits Fund State/Territory Maine's public benefits fund for renewable energy was established as part of the state's electric-industry restructuring legislation, enacted in May 1997. The law directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a voluntary program allowing customers to contribute to a fund that supports renewable-energy projects. This fund was originally known as the Renewable Resource Fund (now it is part of Efficiency Maine Trust).

The PUC adopted rules requiring the state's utilities to offer customers the option of supporting the fund by checking off a contribution of $1, $5, $10 or other amount each month on their electric bill. Every six months, each utility must notify its customers of the existence and purpose of the fund, the means to contribute to the fund, and summaries of projects that have been supported by the fund.

In addition, revenue for the fund comes from the state's renewables portfolio requirement. Utilities may pay an alternative compliance payment (ACP) in lieu of procuring renewable resources to meet portfolio requirements; ACP income supports the Renewable Resource Fund (now part of Efficiency Maine Trust). Approximately $800,000 was collected from the two sources for the fund during 2009 and an estimated $1.325 million during 2010 and approximately $800,000 in FY2011 (see Efficiency Maine Trust FY2011 Annual report for details).

The fund supports grants for renewable-energy demonstration projects to Maine-based nonprofits, consumer-owned electric transmission and distribution utilities, community-based nonprofit organizations, community action programs, municipalities, quasi-municipal corporations or districts, and school administrative units. The first funding solicitation was issued in 2003.* As of June 2011 (HB 568), the fund is also authorized to support the solar and wind rebate program.

Efficiency Maine Trust administers the fund and must report to the Joint Standing Committee of the Legislature every year by December 1. The annual report includes a description of commission actions, accounting of total deposits and expenditures from the fund, and a description of any research and development or community demonstration projects that received funding. See the Efficiency Maine Reports for additional information on the Renewable Resource Fund (through 2009, see general Efficiency Maine Annual Reports after 2009 for information).

Background In 2007, Public Law 403 established the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) alternative compliance payment, the revenues of which are added to the Renewable Resource Fund. LD 36 expanded funding eligibility to additional types of organizations and transferred management of the fund from the State Planning Office to the PUC. Most recently, the Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future (Public Law 372, June 2009) established a new entity, the Efficiency Maine Trust, which became responsible for Maine's energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. All of the funds in Renewable Energy Fund were transferred to Efficiency Maine Trust July 1, 2010.

  • The fund has support research and development via grants provided by the Maine Technology Institute. As of May 2010, funding has been fully allocated.
Effluent and Pretreatment Standards (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations describe prohibited discharges into surface water and groundwater systems and set effluent standards for secondary treatment facilities. Effluent limitations and pretreatment requirements typically follow federal standards, but additional standards are prescribed for sources not regulated by the federal government.
El Paso Electric Company - Small Business and Large Commercial Programs (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility El Paso Electric (EPE) offers several incentive programs targeting small business owners as well as larger commercial and industrial EPE customers.

The Large Commercial Solutions Program is designed to help businesses address rising energy costs through the installation of energy efficiency improvements. The program offers objective, third-party consulting on energy usage and efficiency, supporting customers to identify cost-effective projects, properly evaluate vendor proposals, and leverage the resulting energy savings and cash incentives to finance additional improvements. Technical assistance, and communications support services are also offered through this program. Upgrades to lighting, HVACsystems and roofs are eligible for this program, as well as measurement and verification services. Please contact the utility or program representative for additional information on this program.

The El Paso Electric Small Commercial Solutions Program offers participating contractors, and EPE customers, cash and non-cash incentives for implementing energy efficiency improvements in the Texas portion of the El Paso Electric Service territory. The Small Commercial Solutions Program is specifically available to El Paso Electric business customers in Texas with up to 100 kW maximum demand. Incentives are available for qualifying measures in retrofit and new construction projects, and are available on first come, first served basis. Solar Photovoltaics, reroofing, lighting and HVAC upgrades are eligible for incentives under this program. El Paso Electric has partnered with CLEAResult Consulting, Inc. to administer the program. Please contact the utility or program representative for additional information on this program.
El Paso Electric Company - Solar PV Pilot Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Utility Note: All available 2014 funds are fully subscribed and the 2014 program is closed to new applications.


El Paso Electric (EPE) offers rebates to both residential and non-residential customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or buildings. Rebates are offered at a flat rate of $0.75 per watt-DC for both residential and non-residential customers.

Residential systems are limited to a $7,500 incentive, and non-residential systems are limited to a $37,500 incentive. Rebates may be assigned to the customer, a service provider, or a third party. The 2014 program budget is $402,000 ($212,500 for residential and $189,500 for non-residential). Past program budgets were: $141,300 (2010), $1,350,000 (2011), $1,150,000 (2012), and $425,000 (2013).


EPE claims ownership of renewable energy certificates (RECs) produced by systems that receive incentives.


Eligibility


Individual systems must be sized between 1 kilowatt (kW) and 50 kW (per S.B. 1910, which came into effect June 2011) to be eligible for the incentive. In addition, systems may not be sized to produce energy in excess of that required to meet annual on-site energy consumption. Customers may only apply for one rebate per point of service, as defined by a unique meter ESI-ID number. Customers with multiple points of service are therefore permitted to apply for multiple rebates, subject to other program requirements.


Systems must be new, connected to the grid on the customer side of the meter, meet minimum estimated performance requirements (80% of optimum), and meet all applicable code and utility interconnection requirements. All equipment (i.e., modules, inverters, and meters) must meet standard quality and safety requirements (e.g., inverters must certified under UL-1741 or its equivalent). All installations must be performed by service providers who meet program eligibility requirements. Service providers are also subject to ongoing quality assurance standards and are required to attend technical training sessions. Installations may be subject to a variety of inspection and performance monitoring requirements in the short- and long-term. Special considerations and rules may apply to new construction projects, apartments, rentals, condominiums, leased properties, large companies, and government agencies. Interested parties are encouraged to contact the program manager prior to submitting an application.
Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) Line Extension Analysis State/Province The Public Service Commission has the authority to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of electrical supply lines, and to issue additional rules for this purpose. Section 49-21.1 addresses limitations on other activity near high-voltage transmission lines.
Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies applicable to electric generating and transmission facilities within the state.
Electric Light & Power Rules (North Carolina) Generating Facility Rate-Making
Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals
Safety and Operational Guidelines
Utility These rules shall apply to any person, firm, or corporation (except municipalities, or agents thereof) which is now or may hereafter become engaged as a public utility in the business of furnishing electric current for domestic, commercial or industrial consumers within the State of North Carolina. The rules are intended to define good practice which can normally be expected. They are intended to insure adequate service and to protect the public from unfair practices and the utilities from unreasonable demands.

Each utility shall, at such times and in such form as the Commission shall prescribe, report to the Commission and the Public Staff the results of all tests required to be made or the information contained in any records required to be kept by the utility. Each utility shall maintain its plant, distribution system and facilities at all times in proper condition for use in rendering safe and adequate service. Each utility shall, upon request of the Commission or the Public Staff, file with it a statement regarding the condition and adequacy of its plant, equipment, facilities and service in such form as may be required by the Commission.

Each public utility or person, prior to commencing construction of a new transmission line for which a certificate is required shall first obtain a certificate of environmental compatibility and public convenience and necessity from the Commission. Each year, beginning in 2008, each electric power supplier or its designated utility compliance aggregator shall file with the Commission the electric power supplier’s plan for complying with the state’s RPS.
Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province Electric power generating facilities with a combined capacity greater than 25 MW, as well as associated transmission lines, may not be constructed or begin operation prior to the issuance of a certificate from the Utilities Board.
Electric Power Transmission and Distribution (EPTD) Smart Grid Program (New York) Grant Program State/Province Up to $10 million in funds is available from NYSERDA to support research and engineering studies, product development and demonstration projects that improve the reliability, efficiency, quality, and overall performance of the electric power delivery system in New York State. The primary objective of the program is to promote the development of a smart grid that accommodates a diverse supply of generation resources, enhances overall grid performance and enables customers to reduce costs, energy consumption, and environmental impacts. Preferred technologies include distributed energy resources integration, grid scale energy storage, and renewable energy integration.
Electric Transmission Lines (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province Electric transmission lines capable of operating at 69 kV or greater cannot be constructed along, across, or over any public highways or grounds outside of cities without a franchise from the Utilities Division, as discussed in this section. In some circumstances, an expedited franchise may be obtained for the upgrade of existing transmission lines operating at 34.5 kV to 69 kV.
Electric Transmission Lines (Nebraska) Siting and Permitting State/Province The Public Service Commission has jurisdiction over all electricity transmission lines crossing over or under railroad tracks at public highway crossings. This section contains general regulations on the construction of electricity transmission lines, as well as regulations on their construction near highways, telephone lines, and airports.
Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Generating Facility Rate-Making
Siting and Permitting
State/Province This legislation authorizes the Public Service Commission to promulgate regulations related to investor owned utilities in South Carolina, and addresses service areas, rates and charges, and operating procedures for these entities.
Rate-Making Principles (Kansas) Generating Facility Rate-Making State/Province This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility’s investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a contract for purchasing power. There is no restriction on the type or the size of electric generating unit for which rate-making principles can be set in advance. A petition for predetermining rate-making principles will include a description of the following: the utility’s conservation measures, demand-side management efforts, 10-year generation and load forecast, and all power supply alternatives considered. The KCC may review, but need not require, a competitive request for proposal process used by the utility. If the KCC fails to issue a determination within 180 days of the petition filing, the rate-making principles the utility proposed will be deemed to have been approved by the commission and shall be binding. If the project is built, once it is placed in service the rate-making principles apply to that generating facility in all subsequent rate cases.
Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and extension of such facilities, as well as finances and fees.
Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Companies (South Dakota) Line Extension Analysis State/Province This legislation contains provisions pertaining to a corporation formed for the purpose of constructing, maintaining and operating a street railway or railways; generating, transmitting or distributing electricity to be sold to or used by the public for heat, light or power manufacturing; or producing, supplying, or transporting natural or artificial gas. The chapter addresses the powers and stocks of such corporations.
Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) Fees State/Province Each person or other organization engaged in the generation, manufacture, or production of electricity and electrical energy in the state of Montana, either through waterpower or by any other means, is required to pay a quarterly license tax of $.0002 per kilowatt hour on all electricity and electrical energy generated, manufactured, or produced, as measured at the place of production. There is no production incentive; however, an interest differential credit is allowed to utility providers for low-interest loans provided to customers for energy efficiency improvements.
Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Fees State/Province This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the Montana electric utility industry that allows Montana customers to choose their supplier of electricity and related services in a competitive market. The Act reduces property taxes applied to electrical generation facilities while adding a wholesale energy transaction tax imposed on each kilowatt hour of electricity transmitted in the state.
Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) Siting and Permitting State/Province To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and unincorporated areas of Indiana are divided into geographic areas, to be assigned to an electricity provider that will have the sole right to furnish retail electric service to customers.
Eligible Facility Borrower (Missouri) Loan Program State/Province The Missouri State Treasurer’s Office administers the Missouri Linked Deposit Program, one of the nation’s most utilized low interest loan programs. In order to promote Missouri’s economic growth and development, below-market rate deposits of state funds are placed in Missouri financial institutions, allowing eligible borrowers to obtain low interest loans from that institution. The borrower typically saves 25-30% of the interest paid on a standard business loan. An Eligible Facility Borrower is a development facility or renewable fuel production facility borrower; otherwise defined as any partnership, corporation, cooperative, or limited liability company organized or incorporated under the laws of this state consisting of not less than twelve producer members for the purpose of owning or operating within this state a development facility or a renewable fuel production facility. The production facility borrower must be qualified by the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority. The energy must derived from a renewable, domestically grown organic compound capable of powering machinery, including an engine or power plant, and any by-product derived from such energy source.
Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Generating Facility Rate-Making State/Province This statute establishes as state policy the goal to furnish electricity as efficiently and cheaply as possible, and therefore to, “avoid and eliminate conflict and competition between public power districts, public power and irrigation districts, individual municipalities, registered groups of municipalities, electric membership associations, and cooperatives in furnishing electric energy to retail and wholesale customers, to avoid and eliminate the duplication of facilities and resources which result therefrom, and to facilitate the settlement of rate disputes between suppliers of electricity.” It is also the policy of the state to “prepare for an evolving electricity retail market.” The remainder of this section contains regulations for suppliers of electricity, establishment and modification of service areas and electric generation facilities, and public power districts.
Embedded Generation (New Brunswick, Canada) Performance-Based Incentive Utility NB Power has seen an increase in the amount of companies and individuals who are interested in generating electricity using an environmentally sustainable energy source. As a result, NB Power has implemented an Embedded Generation program which complements their existing net metering program.

With the embedded generation program, potential developers, or Independent Power Producers (IPP), can connect their environmentally sustainable generation unit to NB Power's 12 kV distribution system. Typical embedded generators may include a landfill or a sawmill.

The embedded generation unit may range in size from 100 kW to 3,000 kW. However, certain areas of the distribution system are more limited than others therefore generation output may be limited or restricted in certain areas of the province. Size limitations are determined as part of the application process.

Unlike net metering, the embedded generator's energy output is not used to offset the customer's existing electricity consumption. Rather, NB Power would purchase the renewable energy and environmental attributes at a set price called a Feed-in tariff.

The Feed-in tariff is designed to make it easier for IPP's to sell their electricity to NB Power's distribution system at a fixed, stable price and under a long-term contract.

The Feed-in tariff effective June 1, 2010 is 9.728 cents per kWh. This is based on the cost of electricity supplied from the distribution system and will be reviewed periodically and may be modified according to changing technological, market conditions and annual rate increases. Modifications will apply only to future contracts, not to existing contracts already executed.
Emergency Episode Standards (Ohio) Environmental Regulations State/Province This chapter of the law authorizing the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives a detailed description of the excessive buildup of air contaminants during air pollution episodes that leads to an emergency.

The law sets the standards for limits on different types of air pollution, the criteria for an emergency situation, and the foundation for emergency action programs.

For more information, visit the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Division of Air Pollution Control.
Eminent Domain (Indiana) Siting and Permitting State/Province Utilities, corporations, and gas storage facilities may invoke the law of eminent domain in certain circumstances, as provided for in this legislation.
Eminent Domain Law (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations confer the power of eminent domain and describe procedures for exercising eminent domain in Iowa.
Eminent Domain Rights (Florida) Siting and Permitting State/Province Developers of certain facilities, including dams to be used for hydropower, natural gas companies, wastewater systems, and coal pipelines, may be eligible to exercise eminent domain powers in certain situations.
Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa) Environmental Regulations State/Province These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may be implemented to allow higher than standard emissions of one contaminant in exchange for lower emissions of another contaminant.
Emission Statements (New Jersey) Safety and Operational Guidelines State/Province This rule applies to a facility if the facility emits or has the potential to emit, directly or indirectly to the outdoor atmosphere, any air contaminant at a rate greater than or equal to the applicable reporting threshold. The owner or operator of such a facility shall submit to the Department of Environmental Protection an Emission Statement for each reporting year in accordance with the stated rules. The Emission Statement shall report the actual air contaminant emissions released from the facility directly or indirectly into the outdoor atmosphere during the year.
Employment Incentive Credit (New York) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Employment Incentive Credit is through the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance based on the same qualifying investment for the ITC. The credit is equal to 1.5% to 2.5% of investment based on increased employment over the year prior to investment. The unused credit may be carried forward for 15 years.
Employment Tax Increment Financing Program (Maine) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Employment Tax Increment Financing Program assists business investment projects that create at least five new, high quality jobs within Maine. An approved business may be reimbursed 30, 50, or 75% (80% in Pine Tree Development Zones) of the state income tax withholdings from net new payroll for up to ten years.
Empowerment Zone Tax Credit (Montana) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Empowerment Zone Tax Credit allows for eligible businesses located in such zones a $500 credit against income tax liability for each qualifying employee the first year, $1,000 for the second year and $1,500 for the third year of employment. If the credit exceeds the taxpayers' income tax liability, the credit may be carried forward 7 years and carried back 3 years. In addition to the income tax credits, the employer is also entitled to a credit against the taxes imposed by the insurance premium tax.
Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations State/Province This document lists endangered, threatened, and species of special concern in Connecticut, along with procedures for petitioning to add or remove a species from these lists and to add or remove an area identified as an essential habitat. Such areas are identified by the Commissioner.
Energy Conservation Improvements Property Tax Exemption (New York) Property Tax Incentive State/Territory Qualifying energy-conservation improvements to homes are exempt from real property taxation to the extent that the addition would increase the value of the home. The exemption includes general municipal property taxes, school district taxes, and special ad valorem taxes, but does not apply to special assessments. Eligible properties include single-family to four-family dwellings. The exemption applies directly to a variety of equipment and measures, but the statute also states that any conservation-related state or federal tax credit or deduction is also exempt from New York's property tax under this statute. The state Tax Assessor's Manual also specifically identifies solar and wind energy systems as eligible for the exemption.
Energy Conservation Loan (Connecticut) State Loan Program State/Territory Energy Conservation Loans are available through the Connecticut Housing Investment Fund, Inc. (CHIF) to owners of one- to four-family homes who meet established income limits for family size and location. Interest rates vary in accordance with the borrower's family size and income, and the loan may be repaid over 10 years. Single-family homes can receive a 0% interest rate if the family has below a 50% Median Income, or if the loan is for a furnace/boiler that is ENERGY STAR rated.


Loans for large residential properties are available through the Multi-Family Energy Conservation Loan Program. The terms of this loan are similar to loans for single-family dwellings, with a higher principal available on the loan.

Applications for these programs are available from the program web site above. In addition to the application, the borrower must submit copies of the past two years' federal tax returns (with schedules) and a copy of a monthly mortgage statement (or a release of mortgage or deed).
Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption (Ohio) Sales Tax Incentive State/Territory Ohio may provide a sales and use tax exemption for certain tangible personal property used in energy conversion, solid waste energy conversion, or thermal efficiency improvement facilities designed, constructed, or installed after December 31, 1974.


Qualifying energy conversion facilities are those that are used for the primary purpose of converting natural gas or fuel oil to an alternate fuel or power source excluding propane, butane, naphtha, fuel oil, or natural gas. Solid waste conversion facilities include those that convert solid or semi-solid waste from industrial operations including public utilities, commercial distribution, research, agricultural, and community operations, and including garbage, street dirt, and debris. Thermal efficiency improvement is defined as "the recovery and use of waste heat or waste steam produced incidental to electric power generation, industrial process heat generation, lighting refrigeration, or space heating."


Facilities must apply for an Exempt Facilities Certificate from the Department of Taxation, which must also be approved by the Development Services Agency. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. The application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation web site (form number ECF).


Contact the Department of Taxation for more information.
Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province This legislation applies to energy conversion facilities designed for or capable of generating 100 MW or more of electricity, wind energy facilities with a combined capacity of 100 MW, certain transmission facilities, and AC/DC conversion facilities. Such facilities may not be constructed or operated in the state without a prior permit from the Public Utilities Commission to ensure that to ensure that the energy requirements of the state are met and that the location, construction, and operation of such facilities will produce minimal adverse effects on the environment and the citizens of the state. Permit requirements and procedures are addressed in the legislation. Additional siting regulations are addressed in the SD Administrative Rules 20:10:22.
Energy Development and Conservation (Iowa) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Province This statute sets the development of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources as the goal of the state, and calls on the state to periodically evaluate available renewable energy resources and their current and future technological potential. The statute calls on state and local governments, as well as educational institutions and nonprofit organizations, to implement energy-saving measures and to use renewable energy whenever possible. A loan program is established to aid these entities in this endeavor. The state will also administer an energy city designation program, with the objective of encouraging cities to develop and implement innovative energy efficiency programs and to produce and use renewable energy.
Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program (Florida) Enterprise Zone State/Province In the 2009 Legislative Session, the Florida Legislature established the Pilot Program to address economic development and the creation of energy efficient land use patterns. The Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program aims to develop a model to help communities cultivate green economic development, encourage renewable electric energy generation, manufacture products that contribute to energy conservation and green jobs, and further implement building code standards relative to discouraging sprawl and developing energy-efficient land use patterns and greenhouse gas reduction strategies. Two communities, Miami Beach and Sarasota County, have been selected as pilot sites, and aim to implement a variety of sustainability measures, including renewable energy generation projects, over the duration of the program. All incentives and benefits provided for enterprise zones shall be available to the energy economic zones designated on or before July 1, 2010, and exempts any development in an energy economic zone from the Development of Regional Impact process.
Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Bond Program (New Mexico) State Bond Program State/Territory New Mexico's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bonding Act, which became law in April 2005, authorizes up to $20,000,000 in bonds to finance energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements in state government and school district buildings. At the request of a state agency or school district, the New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department will conduct an energy assessment of a building to determine specific efficiency measures which will result in energy and cost savings. A state agency or school district may install or enter into contracts for the installation of energy efficiency measures on the building identified in the assessment. An installation contract may be entered into for a term of up to 10 years.

The bonds are exempt from taxation by the state, and any type of renewable energy system and most energy efficiency measures, including energy recovery and combined heat and power (CHP) systems, are eligible for funding. Projects financed with the bonds will be paid back to the bonding authority using the savings on energy bills.
Energy Efficiency Loans for State Government Agencies (Kentucky) State Loan Program State/Territory Through the Green Bank of Kentucky, executive branch state agencies may be eligible for three separate energy loan products, depending on the proposed energy conservation improvements.* Prior to applying, all agencies are required to submit an energy survey (available on the Green Bank's web site). The Green Bank will then forward the loan application packet (including information regarding the additional required documentation) for the agency to complete and submit. All application letters must be signed by the agency head.

Initial funding for the Green Bank of Kentucky provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) through the Kentucky State Energy Program.

eSELF Revolving Loan
This loan is for energy conservation projects costing between $50,000 and $225,000 that will result in at least a 20% energy reduction. Improvement projects funded under this loan will managed directly by the state agency.

Hybrid Revolving Loan
This loan is for energy conservation projects costing between $50,000 and $600,000. An energy audit or engineering analysis is required as well as a design and development package. The state agency is responsible for procuring materials and service. The cost of the audit/engineering analysis may be rolled into the loan.

ESPC Revolving Loan
This loan is for comprehensive energy conservation projects costing more than $600,000 and that utilize an Energy Savings Performance Company (ESPC) or Energy Service Company (ESCO). A detailed industrial energy audits as well as cost-benefit analysis is required. The cost of the audit/engineering analysis may be rolled into the loan.

*Technically, renewable energy technologies would be eligible for funding under this program, as long as the payback period is 15 years or less. In Kentucky, where electricity rates are approximately $0.06 per kilowatt hour, this is very difficult to achieve.
Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program State Loan Program State/Territory Note: The first round of applications was due April 12, 2010. A new round of loans will be available once the loan fund has been replenished.

South Dakota offers loans to nonprofits, schools, and government agencies located in South Dakota to pay for energy audits, energy efficiency improvements, and renewable energy installations. Loans must be repaid within 10 years, and carry a 0% interest rate. The loan program is available to all K-12 school districts, South Dakota Technical Schools, and community-based nonprofits.

Renewable energy projects must be built on site at government buildings. The capacity of such systems are limited as follows:

  • Photovoltaics: Must be "appropriately-sized" on an existing rooftop or parking shade structure, or a maximum of 60 kW if located on the ground within the boundaries of a government facility.
  • Wind turbines: Must be 20 kW or smaller.
  • Solar thermal: Must be 20 kW or smaller.
  • Solar thermal hot water: Must be appropriately sized for small buildings.
  • Ground source heat pump: Must be 5.5-ton capacity or smaller. Horizontal, vertical, ground, or closed-loop systems are eligible.
  • Combined heat and power: Must be appropriately sized for the building where it is located.
  • Biomass thermal - Must be 3 MMBTU/hour or smaller. Must use Best Available Control Technologies.
Applications are available on the program web site. Reporting, job creation, Davis Bacon Act, and all other Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant requirements apply.
Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire) Siting and Permitting State/Province The statute establishes a procedure for the review, approval, monitoring, and enforcement of compliance in the planning, siting, construction, and operation of energy facilities, including transmission pipelines. The siting law and its administrative rules designated as Energy Facility Site Evaluation and reviewed by a committee, have been used to guide the review and evaluation process of natural gas transmission systems, natural-gas fired cogeneration power plants, transmission lines, new natural gas pipelines, fuel storage and distribution facilities, and electric power generation facilities capable of operating at 30 MW or greater capacity.
Energy Generation Project Permitting (Vermont) Environmental Regulations State/Province The Vermont Energy Generation Siting Policy Commission is mandated to survey best practices for siting approval of electric generation projects (all facilities except for net- and group-net-metered facilities) and for public participation and representation in the siting process, and to report to the Governor and to the Vermont Legislature on their findings by April 30, 2013. The Commission's documents include a summary the various permitting requirements of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (ANR) for energy generation projects. The permit requirement is determined by the physical and operational attributes of the project. A generation project may trigger the following ANR permit or approval requirements: stormwater construction, stormwater operational, multi-sector general permit, wetlands permit, stream alteration permit, 401 water quality certification, wastewater disposal and/or water supply permit, direct discharge, air pollution control, and endangered species takings.
Energy Innovation Assistance Program (EIAP) (Quebec, Canada) Grant Program State/Province The Energy innovation assistance program (PAIE) aims to encourage the development of new technologies or innovative processes focusing on energy efficiency or emerging energy sources by financially supporting project developers who actively contribute to the various stages of the innovation process. This program is no longer active.
Energy Investment Loan Program (Mississippi) State Loan Program State/Territory

Mississippi offers low-interest loans for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. Eligible renewable energy technologies include solar thermal, solar space heat, solar process heat, photovoltaics (PV), alternative fuels, geothermal, biomass, landfill gas and hydropower. All projects must demonstrate that they will reduce a facility's energy costs. The interest rate is 2% below the prime rate, with a maximum loan term of 10 years. Loans range from $15,000 to $500,000. This program is supported by a revolving loan fund of $7 million, established through federal oil overcharge funds.

Applications are provided to interested parties by request. Contact the Mississippi Development Authority for more information.

Energy Loan Fund (Ohio) State Loan Program State/Territory Note: The application period for the Energy Loan Fund will begin again on March 1, 2015. Interested applicants should email energy@development.ohio.gov to be notified when the application is available.


The Energy Loan Fund provides low-cost financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements to Ohio-based businesses with less than 500 employees, manufacturers enrolled in the Energy Efficiency Program for Manufacturers, nonprofits, and public entities. For further information regarding eligibility, please view the Program Guidelines and Application Process.


The typical loan limit is $1 million, but the Ohio Development Services Agency reserves the right to increase these limits on a case-by-case basis.


The applications must demonstrate a minimum 15 percent reduction in energy use 15as a result of the project. Other evaluation criteria include the application’s completeness, whether application meets the requirements of applicable state and/or federal funding sources, type of eligible technologies utilized and the extent of energy savings achieved as a result of the project, extent of job creation and improvement in environmental quality as a result of the project, extent of match investment in the project, the project readiness and timeline to complete project by deadline of certain funding sources, applicant’s need for financial assistance to complete project, and the advancement of the mission of the Office of Energy.


The pre-application review process takes from 7 to 10 days and a final resopnse should occur within 45 days.


The Energy Loan Fund is managed by the Ohio Development Services Agency. Funding is provided through the Ohio Advanced Energy Fund and the Federal State Energy Program.


For more information visit the program website or read the frequently asked questions.
Energy Loan Fund State Loan Program State/Territory The Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA) is administering the Energy Loan Fund with funds collected through the Advanced Energy Fund and the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. Public entities, manufacturers, small businesses are eligible for funding, though other applicants will be considered. Funds will be awarded to qualifying projects on a first-come, first-served basis until the funds have been depleted. Priority will be given to projects with an energy savings payback of 1 to 4 years. Projects must result in energy savings of at least 15% and must be installed in Ohio. Interested applicants should submit a pre-application through the ODSA web site.
Energy Loan Fund for Schools (Oklahoma) State Loan Program State/Territory The Oklahoma Department of Commerce has established a loan/lease fund for public and non-profit K-12 schools to improve energy efficiency.


Two categories of funding are available for schools to reduce energy consumption. Category I funding will pay for technical and energy audits, the development of Energy Management Plans, and any professional services that contribute to the planning and design of energy reduction systems and measures. Category II funding covers the actual acquisition and installation of energy conservation measures.

All projects must be shown to reduce energy consumption, have a positive return on investment, and be able to be repaid within 6 years. Loan funds may not be used to pay off an existing loan but may be used to leverage additional third-party financing of energy efficiency projects. An eligible school district may only have one active loan at a time.
Energy Loan Program (Missouri) State Loan Program State/Territory Note: The Division of Energy is now accepting applications for the FY2015 program. Applications are due October 31, 2014.


The Missouri Energy Loan Program, administered by the Division of Energy in the Missouri Department of Economic Development (DED), is available for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects for public and governmental buildings and structures. Eligible recipients include public schools (K-12), public/private colleges and universities, city/county governments, public water and wastewater treatment facilities, and public/private non-profit hospitals.

Loan amounts are based on projected energy savings from energy efficiency upgrades, which result in monetary savings that are used to repay the loan. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 (July 2014 – October 2014), financing is set at a 2.5% interest rate and 1% loan origination fee. Repayment schedules are determined on an individual project basis, but not to exceed 10 years. Loans under this program are determined on a competitive basis according to payback period.


In FY2014, $5,000,000 in loan funding was available, and in FY2015, $7,500,000 in loan funding is available. Loans are available in amounts from $5,000 to $1,500,000 per applicant. As funds remain after review and priority ranking of applications, the department has considered awarding loans in excess of $1,500,000.


Background


The Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Division of Energy has provided the energy loans from petroleum violation escrow funds and bonds since 1989. Since the program's inception, loans totaling over $89 million have been made through this program, resulting in an estimated cumulative savings of $167 million. The interest rates for energy loan financing are generally lower than the market interest rates. Loan recipients repay the loans with money saved on energy costs as a result of implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. An energy saving loan is not defined as debt for public schools and local governments and therefore does not count against debt limits or require a public vote or bond issuance.
Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) Environmental Regulations
Generation Disclosure
State/Province This act requires that every energy enterprise file with the Minister a return setting out statistics and information relating to its ownership and control; financial information; information, including financial, about its exploration for, development, production, processing, refining and marketing of energy commodities; its energy commodity resources, reserves and properties; and its research and development programs. This law does not apply to corporations incorporated outside Canada. For oil and gas, dealer is required to file a return must also submit additional statistics, information and documentation that may be required by the Minister for any purpose.
Energy Planning (Minnesota) Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals State/Province This statute affirms the State's strong interest in the development and use of renewable energy resources, minimizing fossil fuel consumption and diversifying energy sources, as well as the creation of effective energy forecasting, planning, and education programs. The statute sets the energy policy for the State, aiming for a 15 percent reduction in per capita use of fossil fuels by 2015, and for 25 percent of total energy to be derived from renewables by 2025. The commissioner of the Department of Commerce is required to monitor renewable energy development in the state, and, in consultation with the Public Utilities Commission, to provide an annual report to the legislature describing existing and needed electricity transmission infrastructure. The commissioner can provide grants to local governments to assist with energy planning and renewable energy development purposes. The commissioner will also develop, implement, and administer a microenergy loan program to finance community-owned or publicly owned small scale renewable energy systems or to provide loans or other aids to small businesses to install small-scale renewable energy systems.
Energy Policy Commission (North Dakota) Siting and Permitting State/Province Created in 2007 by the North Dakota Legislative Assembly, the EmPower North Dakota Commission designed a comprehensive energy policy for the state of North Dakota. Since 2007 the Commission has updated the policy every 18 months and made policy recommendations to the legislature.
Energy Project Financing (Connecticut) Loan Program State/Province CDA, in collaboration with the Connecticut Energy, Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA), provides Energy Project Financing to promote advancements in energy technologies which will create business and job growth. CDA helps to provide investment capital through its loan and loan guarantee programs, attracting additional lenders who can help lower risks and costs.
Energy Project and Equipment Financing (Virginia) State Loan Program State/Territory The Virginia Resources Authority (VRA) was created in 1984 and provides financial assistance to local governments in Virginia for a variety of projects, including energy and energy conservation projects. In March 2011, H.B. 2389 added "renewable energy" to the list of eligible projects (though it may have already been technically eligible under the "energy" category). VRA offers several financing options, including the Virginia Pooled Financing Program, Revolving Loan Funds, and Term Financing. Interested entities should use the contact form available on the VRA web site in order to discuss financing options with VRA staff.
Energy Recovery Standard Offer Program (Ontario, Canada) Performance-Based Incentive Utility The Ontario Power Authority developed the Energy Recovery Standard Offer Program (ERSOP) to support efficient generation of electricity from recovery of otherwise wasted energy sources, such as un-utilized by-products that can be used as fuels. The goal of the ERSOP Program is to facilitate increased development of Energy Recovery Facilities up to a maximum capacity of 20 MW, connected to a Distribution System, and in an area where such generation can be effectively accommodated. Projects suitable for the ERSOP Program include energy recovery from pressure reduction facilities, energy recovery from hot exhaust streams (other than from electricity generating facilities), and energy recovery from otherwise flared process by-products.

The program allocated 50 MW of capacity for the launch of the program in 2011. The program is on hold as of September 2011 as the OPA as determines the potential remaining capacity for the program for the launch period of the program. The program, in combination with the complimentary Combined Heat and Power Standard Offer Program that applies to natural gas electrical generating facilities that are combined with heat generation, are initially limited to a total combined program capacity of 200 MW. Individual projects are capped at 20 MW.

The Contract Price for the program is $90.00/MWh. Each year following commercial operation of a facility, 30% of the Contract Price shall be escalated on the basis of increases in the consumer price index.
Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption (Iowa) Corporate Exemption State/Territory Iowa imposes a replacement generation tax of $0.0006 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) on various forms of electricity generated within the state. This tax is imposed in lieu of a property tax on generation facilities.

Under the Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption, the following facilities are exempt from the replacement tax:


  • All energy generated by methane gas conversion property to the extent the property is used in connection or conjunction with a publicly-owned sanitary landfill or used to collect waste that would otherwise be collected by or deposited with a publicly-owned sanitary landfill,
  • Wind energy conversion property that is eligible for a tax credit or that is subject to the special valuation of wind energy conversion property, and
  • Self-generators with on-site facilities. In order to qualify for the exemption, self -generators must wholly own or lease the facility in question and produce electricity solely for their own consumption, except for inadvertent unscheduled deliveries to their electric utility. However, facilities that do not consume all energy on-site are not required to pay the replacement tax on energy that is used to operate the facility.
In addition, large hydroelectric generators (100 megawatt or more) pay a reduced generation tax equivalent to $0.000001847 per kWh.
Energy Research Project, Review (Minnesota) Climate Policies State/Province The commissioner shall continuously identify, monitor, and evaluate research studies and demonstration projects pertaining to alternative energy and energy conservation systems and methodologies, including: (1) solar energy systems for heating and cooling; (2) energy systems using wind, agricultural wastes, forestry products, peat, and other nonconventional energy resources; (3) devices and technologies increasing the energy efficiency of energy-consuming appliances, equipment, and systems; (4) hydroelectric power; and (5) other projects the commissioner deems appropriate and of direct benefit to Minnesota and other states of the upper Midwest.
Energy Revolving Loan Fund - Clean Energy Advanced Manufacturing (Michigan) Industry Recruitment/Support State/Territory Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations.


In January 2010, Michigan enacted the Public Act 242 of 2009, which established the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Fund Program. The Clean Energy Advanced Manufacturing portion of this program is available to small businesses located in Michigan who are seeking to invest and diversify in clean energy sectors, manufacturing renewable energy and energy efficiency systems and components.

Applicants are evaluated based on minimum credit standards and face-to-face interviews. Loan recipients are required to submit quarterly reports related to energy use, payback, and other economic information. Program funds cannot be used for any systems installed before the date of the loan agreement. In order to qualify for the loans, the applicant must have 500 employees or less.


Program information and applications are available on the program web site.
Energy Revolving Loan Fund - Farm Energy (Michigan) State Loan Program State/Territory In January 2010, Michigan enacted the Public Act 242 of 2009, which established the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Fund Program. The Farm Energy Audit/Assessment portion of this program is available to family farms in Michigan for projects recommended through the Michigan Farm Energy Audit program. Applicants are evaluated based on minimum credit standards and face-to-face interviews. Loan recipients are required to submit quarterly reports related to energy use. Program funds cannot be used for any systems installed before the date of the loan agreement. For questions regarding farm energy audits, contact Al Go at Michigan State University.
Energy Revolving Loan Fund - Passive Solar (Michigan) State Loan Program State/Territory In January 2010, Michigan enacted the Public Act 242 of 2009, which established the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Fund Program. The Passive Solar Systems portion of the loan program is available to family farms and non-profits located in Michigan. Under this program, a passive solar system is defined as "a structure which can extend the growing season to ten to twelve months without additional supplemental heat or light."

Applicants are evaluated based on minimum credit standards and face-to-face interviews to determine knowledge of and interest in passive solar systems. Loan recipients will be required to attend a passive solar system workshop and are required to submit quarterly reports related to production. Program funds cannot be used for any costs incurred before the date of the loan agreement.

Applications are available on the program web site.
Energy Revolving Loan Fund - Public Entities (Michigan) State Loan Program State/Territory Note: The Michigan Economic Development Corporation is not currently accepting applications for this loan fund. Check the program web site for future solicitations.


In January 2010, Michigan enacted the Public Act 242 of 2009, which established the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Fund Program. The Public Entities portion of the loan program is available to cities and villages located in Michigan for energy efficiency and renewable energy systems. Applicants are evaluated based on minimum credit standards. Program funds cannot be used for any costs incurred before the date of the loan agreement.

The following size restrictions apply for wind, solar thermal water heat, and ground source heat pumps:


  • Wind: 20 kW or smaller
  • Solar Thermal: 20 kW or smaller
  • Ground Source Heat Pump: 5.5 tons of capacity or smaller


Applications are available on the program web site and must be submitted to the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.
Energy Strategy (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Industry Recruitment/Support
Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals
Solar/Wind Access Policy
State/Province Without a local supply of natural gas and oil resources, Prince Edward Island is heavily

reliant on imported sources of energy. Imported oil accounts for 76 percent of PEI's total energy supply, including transportation and heating. Wind resources currently meet approximately 18 percent of the province’s electricity supply with the remainder tied primarily to oil and nuclear power supplied by the new Brunswick Power corporation and imported via two submarine cables connected to the mainland. Ten percent of energy in PEI is supplied by biomass, which includes fuel wood, sawmill residue and municipal waste.

Specific goals: - 500 MW of wind power online by 2013, of which 100 MW will be for domestic use. - 50 percent increase in biomass use by 2013, which will lead to 10 MW of new electrical generation capacity for island utilities. - Increased community wind projects by 2018 - 25 percent further increase in use of biomass by 2018 for an additional 10 MW of electrical generation capacity. - Long-term fixed price contracts for the various forms of renewable energy sources (wind, solar, biomass and earth energy) for community-based renewable projects

Also published is a separate wind energy strategy that outlines a 10-point plan to meet PEI's wind energy goals.
Energy Used in Manufacturing Sales and Use Tax Exemption (Georgia) Sales Tax Incentive State/Province Georgia enacted legislation in April 2012 (HB 386) creating an exemption for energy used in the manufacturing of a product from the state's sales and use taxes. The sale, use, storage, or consumption of energy which is necessary and integral to the manufacture of tangible personal property at a manufacturing plant in the state of Georgia shall be exempt from all sales and use taxation except for the sales and use tax for educational purposes. This includes energy used directly or indirectly in a manufacturing facility. The exemption will be implemented over four years, with 25% phased-in each year beginning on January 1, 2013, and reaching 100% on January 1, 2016.
Energy and Utility Project Review (Wisconsin) Siting and Permitting State/Province The DNR's Office of Energy and Environmental Analysis is responsible for coordinating the review of all proposed energy and utility projects in the state. The Office provides project management within DNR, acting as the main point of contact for project applicants, the Public Service Commission (PSC), other DNR programs and affected stakeholders. The Office provides statewide guidance and consistent application of the regulatory processes established by statutes and rules and provide a corps of experienced natural resource experts whom understand the specifics of energy and utility projects. While the primary mission is to coordinate the regulatory review for siting utility projects, the Office also serves all DNR programs by developing guidance and information on natural resources issues as they relate to the broader planning and infrastructure development efforts for Wisconsin’s energy future.
Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) Corporate Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
State/Province Enhanced Enterprise Zones aim at attracting new businesses or promoting an expansion of existing business in Missouri Enhanced Enterprise Zone. Tax credits will be an amount authorized by DED, based on the state economic benefit, supported by the number of new jobs, wages and new capital investment that the project will create. To qualify, individual business eligibility will be determined by the zone, based on creation of sustainable jobs in a targeted industry or demonstrated impact on local industry cluster development. Service industries can be eligible if a majority of their annual revenues will be derived from services provided out of the state.

Eligibility: To receive tax credits for any of the years, the facility must create and maintain the minimum: - New or expanded business facility – 2 new employees and $100,000 new investment; - Replacement business facility – 2 new employees and $1,000,000 new investment - Company must offer health insurance at all times, of which at least 50% is paid by the employer, to all full time employees in Missouri.

Eligible investment expenditures include the original cost of machinery, equipment, furniture, fixtures, land and building, and/or eight times the annual rental rate paid for the same. Inventory is not eligible.

Tax credits issued under this program are limited to $24,000,000 annually, effective August 28, 2008.
Enterprise Energy Fund Grants (New Hampshire) State Grant Program State/Territory Note: This program is fully subscribed and currently is not accepting applications. Check with the program administrator regarding the possibility of future program funding.


The New Hampshire Community Loan Fund and the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) initiated the Enterprise Energy Fund in 2010. This revolving loan program, supported by State Energy Program (SEP) funds and the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), is designed to help businesses and non-profits in the state make energy improvements to their buildings. Many improvements are eligible for funding, including energy audits, whole-building improvements, equipment and appliance upgrades, lighting upgrades, heating and cooling upgrades, solar-thermal systems, and renewable energy installations, among others. The CDFA and Community Loan Fund will work with organizations to try to make the cost of financing less than the energy savings.


Funding, when available, is awarded to qualified applicants on a first-come, first-served basis. Project applications are evaluated on several criteria, including the financial stability of the business or non-profit, the age of the building for which the project is proposed, and the current energy efficiency of the building (based on an energy audit). In addition, the Enterprise Energy Fund seeks to include a wide range of business types (i.e., small and large) and promote geographic diversity


While primarily a revolving loan program, the Enterprise Energy Fund provides a limited amount of funding for grants. Grants are typically used to lower costs for non-profits that provide "essential services," and to support eligible commercial entities that invest in renewable energy systems to lower the payback period.
Enterprise Energy Fund Loans (New Hampshire) State Loan Program State/Territory Note: This program is fully subscribed and currently is not accepting applications. Check with the program administrator regarding the possibility of future program funding.

The New Hampshire Community Loan Fund and the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority offer the Enterprise Energy Fund. This revolving loan is funded through New Hampshire's State Energy Program allocation under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The purpose of the fund it to help business owners and non-profit organizations in the state make energy improvements on their buildings. A wide range of activities are eligible for funding including energy audits, whole building improvements, equipment and appliance upgrades, lighting upgrades, heating and cooling upgrades, solar thermal technologies, and renewable energy installations, among others. The CDFA and Community Loan Fund will work with organizations to try to make the cost of financing less than the energy savings.

The application period is currently open and applicants must submit initial inquiries via the CDFA grants management website. There is no application deadline, however, funding is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Project applications will be evaluated on criteria including the financial stability of the business or non-profit, the age of the building where the efficiency project is proposed, and the current energy efficiency of the building (based on an energy audit). In addition, because the Enterprise Energy Fund is trying to include a wide range of business types (small, large) and geographic diversity, those factors will also be considered in funding decisions.

The Enterprise Energy Fund, while primarily a revolving loan, will have a limited amount of funding for grants. These grants will be used to bring costs down for non-profits that provide "essential services," as well as support eligible commercial entities invest in renewable energy systems to bring the payback period down.
Enterprise Fund (Kentucky) Loan Program State/Province The Kentucky Enterprise Fund (KEF) is a state-sponsored, venture capital-like fund that invests in Kentucky-based seed and early stage technology companies. KEF supports the development of entrepreneurial technology companies in Kentucky, stimulates private investment in these companies, and spurs economic growth.

Companies seeking funding from KEF go through a rigorous due diligence process and are judged in terms of industry fit, return on investment, and potential for economic development. The accepted use of funds and additional details on KEF may be found in the KEF Guidelines. Companies may apply for a grant of $30,000 or an initial investment of up to $250,000. Restrictions and repayment conditions may apply (see below).

In order to be eligible for KEF Funding/Investments, companies must:

Be a high-growth, early stage company developing a product, process, or service in an industry of bioscience, environmental and energy technologies, human health and development, information technology and communications or materials science and advanced manufacturing. The company must have its principal place of business in Kentucky or at least 50% of its property and payroll in Kentucky. The company must be organized as a C Corporation or as a Limited Liability Company to be eligible for an investment.
Enterprise Zone Incentives (Florida) Enterprise Zone State/Province Enterprise Zone Incentives encourage business growth within certain geographic areas targeted for economic revitalization. Businesses which create jobs within a designated zone are eligible for several tax incentives, including sales and use tax credit, tax refunds for machinery or equipment, sales tax refund for building materials, and a sales tax exemption for electrical energy.
Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) Enterprise Zone Local The Enterprise Zone Program provides certain tax incentives to corporations, partnerships and proprietorships that locate or expand within designated Enterprise Zones. In addition to state-level tax incentives, businesses may also receive local tax and non-tax incentives for locating or expanding within a designated Enterprise Zone. Section 5 of the Alabama Enterprise Zone Program offers the following tax incentives: Credit based on income tax liability from Enterprize Zone Project Operations; Credit for new capital investment; and a company may claim a credit of up to $1,000 per new permanent employee for training new permanent employees in new skill areas. Section 11 offers certain exemptions.
Enterprise Zone Program (Illinois) Corporate Tax Incentive State/Province The Enterprise Zone Program provides eligible businesses that relocate or expand to a designated zone with tax incentives such as: 1) an investment tax credit; 2) a job tax credit for each job created in the zone; and 3) an exemption on the state utility tax.
Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Corporate Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
State/Province The Enterprise Zone Program is a jobs incentive program providing Louisiana income and franchise tax credits to businesses hiring at least 35% of net, new jobs from targeted groups. Enterprise Zones (EZs) are areas with high unemployment, low income, or a high percentage of residents receiving some public assistance. A business is not required to be located in the EZ, but must create permanent jobs at the EZ site (see eligibility requirements on the website). Benefits include a one-time $2500 credit per job or a 1.5% Refundable Investment Tax Credit.
Enterprise Zone Program (Georgia) Enterprise Zone
Personal Tax Incentives
Property Tax Incentive
Local The Enterprise Zone Program provides various tax incentives to businesses within designated underdeveloped zones in rural or urban areas. The State Enterprise Zone program intends to improve geographic areas within cities and counties that are suffering from disinvestment, underdevelopment, and economic decline, encouraging private businesses to reinvest and rehabilitate such areas. A business may be exempt from property tax and occupation taxes, and may receive an abatement or reduction in otherwise applicable regulatory fees and other fees.
Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) Corporate Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
Local The Enterprise Zone Program eligible projects to apply for state sales and use tax refunds on purchases of all taxable items purchased for use at qualified business sites related to the project or activity. The level and amount of refund is related to the capital investment and jobs created at the qualified business site. In addition, local communities must offer incentives to participants under the enterprise zone program, such as tax abatement, tax increment financing, one-stop permitting, and other incentives developed by participating communities.
Enterprise Zone Real Property Investment Grant (Virginia) Enterprise Zone
Grant Program
State/Province The Enterprise Zone Real Property Investment Grant provides qualified zone investors with cash grants for industrial, commercial or mixed use property. The grant is equal to 20% of the excess above the minimum required investment up to a maximum of $100,000 for companies investing $5 million or less.
Enterprise Zone Retraining Credit Program (South Carolina) Enterprise Zone
Training/Technical Assistance
State/Province The Enterprise Zone Retraining Credit Program is a discretionary incentive that helps existing industries maintain their competitive edge and retain their existing workforce by allowing them to claim a Retraining Credit for existing production employees. If approved for the Enterprise Zone Retraining Credit, companies can reimburse themselves up to 50% of approved training costs for eligible production workers (not to exceed $500 per person per year). This program is also overseen by the Coordinating Council for Economic Development.
Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption (Kansas) Sales Tax Incentive State/Province The Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption offers businesses located in such economic development zones a 100 percent sales tax exemption on the purchase of labor and materials to construct or remodel a facility, as well as on the machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures used in the facility.
Enterprise Zone Tax Credits (Wisconsin) Personal Tax Incentives
Corporate Tax Incentive
Enterprise Zone
State/Province The purpose for the Enterprise Zone Tax Credits is to incent projects involving major expansion of existing Wisconsin businesses or relocation of major business operations from other states to Wisconsin. Refundable tax credits can be earned through job creation, job retention, capital investment, employee training and supply chain purchases from Wisconsin vendors.
Enterprise Zones (Iowa) Industry Recruitment/Support
Enterprise Zone
Training/Technical Assistance
State/Province The Enterprise Zones Program is an incentive for business expansion designed to stimulate development by targeting economically distressed areas in Iowa. Through state and local tax incentives, businesses and developers are encouraged to make new investments, and create or retain jobs in these areas. Businesses locating or expanding in an Enterprise Zone may receive property tax exemptions, funding for employee training, sales tax refunds, Iowa income tax credits, or other tax incentives. An incentive for housing development may also be available to developers and contractors building or rehabilitating housing in an established enterprise zone.

To be eligible, a business must make a minimum qualifying investment of $500,000 during a three year period. Qualifying investment includes the cost of land, buildings, improvements to buildings, manufacturing machinery and equipment, and/or computer hardware. The business must create or retain at least 10 full-time, project-related jobs over a three year period and maintain them for an additional two years. The business must provide some level of medical benefits to all full time employees. Additionally, the business must also provide all full-time employees with a standard medical and dental insurance plan of which the business pays 80% of the premiums for employee-only coverage, pays 50% of the premiums for family coverage, or provides a monetarily-equivalent benefit package. The business must pay new or retained employees a starting wage which is equal to or greater than 90% of the laborshed wage. Wage requirements. The business can not be a retail establish